The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 4, 2013

A Global Contest of Values in EU-US-China Trade
On one side of the globe this week, China opened its annual legislative meeting to endorse the new Communist Party leader, Xi Jinping, as the countrys next president. High expectations have been set for Mr. Xi to radically reform the Chinese economy...
Aleppo Takes First Step toward Post-Assad Governance in Syria
Syrian opposition members elected a local council to manage civilian affairs in rebel-controlled Aleppo Province this weekend, taking a major step toward restoring governance to areas under its control. But it remains unclear how much funding will be...
As Emotions over US-Russia Adoptions Intensify, a Rift Widens into a Chasm
Angry demonstrators in the streets of Moscow echoed top Russian government officials over the weekend in casting doubt on a Texas autopsy finding that the January death of a Russian-born adoptee, 3- year-old Max Shatto, was an accident.In a diplomatic...
Deal at Czech Nuclear Power Plant Fuels US-Russia Economic Rivalry
The nuclear power plant that towers over the green fields outside the small Czech village of Temelin is quickly becoming a frontline in the economic rivalry between the United States and Russia.Companies with ties to both countries are vying for a contract...
Does Keystone XL Report Let Obama off the Hook on Climate Pledge?
A US State Department report released late last week that was noncommittal on the environmental impact of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline is galvanizing opponents of the controversial project who say President Obama is backing away from his commitment...
Do Obama Cabinet Picks Match His Greener Second-Term Talk?
In announcing his new choices to lead the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency Monday, President Obama sent a potentially mixed message about whether he would back up his greener rhetoric since reelection with strong action.Key...
How Legal Marijuana Will Affect Troubled Families
Last fall, voters for the first time approved the legalization of marijuana for recreational use at the state level in Colorado and Washington. Since then, much attention has focused on the conflict between state and federal law, which still classifies...
Iran Nuclear Talks: Saudis, IAEA, Voice Doubt over Tehran's Intentions
The head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency charged Iran Monday with using delaying tactics to put off inspection of a key military research site just hours after Saudi Arabias foreign minister told Secretary of State John Kerry that Irans...
Israel Takes Heat for De Facto Segregation on New West Bank Buses
The Afikim Bus No. 210 pulled up to a stop outside the main shopping mall in this Tel Aviv suburb on its maiden run from Israel to the West Bank on Monday, but for unsuspecting Israelis who tried to board the driver had a swift interdict. "You cannot...
Miriam Makeba: A Woman with 9 Passports but No Home (+Video)
In her 30 years of exile, South Africa singer and activist Miriam Makeba gained prominence as a citizen of the world and a fervent opponent of apartheid. She was a woman with nine passports and honorary citizenship in 10 countries.But Ms. Makebas legacy...
Miriam Makeba: The Fame and Exile of 'Mama Africa'
Google's home page dressed up today in earthy tones and hand- painted patterns. This festive look honors Miriam Makeba, the singer and civil rights activist that many called "Mama Africa."Ms. Makeba played a big role in several important cultural movements...
Miriam Makeba: What's Up with That Clicking Sound Anyway?
Listen carefully to Miriam Makeba's 1957 hit single "Pata Pata," and you'll hear an odd click interspersed with the lyrics.It's not the drummer. It's Makeba's voice."Everywhere we go, people often ask me, 'How do you make that noise,'" she said to a...
New iPhone Release Date Lands in August: Report
Wondering about the new iPhone release date? The Chinese tech site EMSOne is reporting that Apple will release two new iPhone devices in August of this year. The first device, likely titled the iPhone 5S, will be the next flagship Apple smart phone,...
On Kenyan Election Day, Limited Violence and High Turnout
Millions of Kenyans lined up under the burning equatorial sun Monday to vote in the country's most complicated and expensive ballot since it gained its independence from Britain 50 years ago. The last polls, held in 2007, sparked violence that left some 1,100...
Out of Order: Stories from the History of the Supreme Court
In many respects, or at least in spots, Sandra Day OConnors fifth book her second dealing with the Supreme Court is useful and engaging. The average reader will learn much from the former Supreme Court Justice who was the first woman to serve on the...
Painkillers and Healing
When might a painkiller no longer be called a painkiller?Perhaps when it causes pain.According to guidance from Britains National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), that happens when a cycle of taking too many tablets results in medication-overuse...
Push Grows to Blacklist Spain over Digital Pirating
Spain, with one of the worlds worst online piracy track records, is hoping that plans to pass new antipiracy legislation this year will be enough to convince the US government to keep it off its infamous blacklist, despite the Spanish and American entertainment industry...
Readers Write: The Advantages of a Decreasing Western Birth Rate
Pluses of a declining birthrateI was very surprised and dismayed that in the Feb. 4 article "Behind a looming baby bust" there was no mention of the problem of overpopulation worldwide. The burgeoning birthrate adds to the problems of global warming,...
Samsung Galaxy S IV, Due This Month, Could Get Eye-Tracking Tech
On March 14, Samsung will unveil its new flagship smart phone. The Galaxy S IV or Galaxy S4, if you prefer is being watched very carefully in the tech world, and or good reason: Its predecessor, the Galaxy S III, has been one of the only phones in recent...
Sen. Robert Menendez Faces New Questions on Ties to Big Donor
More trouble is looming for Sen. Robert Menendez (D) of New Jersey: According to an Associated Press investigation, the embattled New Jersey Democrat sponsored legislation that, if passed, would have aided one of his biggest donor's investment in a natural gas...