The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 15, 2014

A New Great Irish Emigration, This Time of the Educated
During Ireland's two-decade economic boom, the so-called Celtic Tiger, young people were referred to as "tiger cubs."Now, amid Ireland's sixth year of financial crisis following the 2008 economic crash, you don't hear the term much any more.Since 2008,...
Can Scott Brown Fight off 'Carpet Bagger' Charge in New Hampshire?
Robert F. Kennedy did it. So did Hillary Clinton. But can Scott Brown pull it off?Can Mr. Brown pack his (carpet)bag, move to another state, and hope to win a US Senate seat - as did the two former senators from New York?When Brown on Friday set in motion...
For Many in Crimea, 'It's about Time' to Get Closer to Russia
Galina Patsiuk is so happy about tomorrow's referendum vote to join the Crimean peninsula with Russia that she can hardly hold back the tears."It's like a new dawn for us," Ms. Patsiuk says, excusing her emotions as she chokes up. Standing with a small...
Judge Calls Tenn. Gay Marriage Ban Historical 'Footnote': Do Southerners Now Agree?
In ordering an injunction against Tennessee's ban on gay marriage, a federal judge on Friday called laws against recognizing same sex couples mere "footnotes" in history.As the legal battle over gay rights shifts to the South, the big question now is...
Malaysia Flight Disappearance Looking More like a Sinister Act
Police searched the home of the pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight 370 on Saturday, shortly after Prime Minister Najib Razak said it appeared somebody aboard had deliberately shut down the plane's communications and tracking systems and turned...
Most Americans Support Obama on Ukraine - Tentatively
Perhaps more than any other foreign affairs issue during his tenure, President Barack Obama is being tested by the crisis in Ukraine, where a Russia-designed referendum on the future of Crimea is to be held Sunday.Is it the beginning of a new "Cold War"...
Why Libya's Promise of Success Never Materialized
Libya should be a success story. Its small, mostly urban population sits on vast oil wealth, and it is free of the quixotic repression of former leader Muammar Qaddafi. So why does the country seem headed for breakdown?Key oil facilities have been blockaded...
Why 'Stand Your Ground' Bill Isn't a Sure Thing in Red State Georgia
What so recently seemed like a conservative slam dunk - a Georgia gun-rights bill to boost a "stand your ground" self-defense law - has been so watered down that, in the waning days of the legislative session, even its supporters have begun to falter....
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.