The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 6, 2016

A Hidden Ocean on Another One of Saturn's Moons, Say Scientists
A new study indicates that Dione, one of Saturn's 62 confirmed moons, may have a subsurface ocean.Dione is now the third of Saturn's moons thought to have a substantially large volume of water locked beneath its icy surface. Because water is a key factor...
Are Human Lives Still Getting Longer?
As average American lifespans continue to lengthen, scientists are curious about just how long we can live. A new study published in Nature offers some answers.Researchers based their studies on decades of longevity data from around the world, eventually...
A Very French Reason for Going to the Opera: To Get a Better Job
If you want to climb the corporate ladder in France, you'd better know the names of Voltaire, or Victor Hugo, or Simone de Beauvoir.For upper-management jobs, after diplomas and qualifications are verified, "at one moment or another, the conversation...
Britain's Plans for Immigration Crackdown Prompts Backlash
British home secretary Amber Rudd announced on Tuesday a series of harsh new measures aimed at restricting undocumented immigrants' participation in the economy, while promising to review other proposals to reduce immigration over the long term.The moves...
Can Nonhuman Apes Understand Others' Points of View?
How you see the world may be very different than how someone else sees it. And recognizing that has long been thought to be a uniquely human ability. But when it comes to understanding others' perspectives, humans might not be alone."Reading others'...
Chobani to Give Paid Family Leave to All Employees: A Growing Trend?
Every new parent deserves six weeks paid leave, says Chobani's founder, following the recent birth of his own first child.In an impassioned blog post published Wednesday, Chobani founder and chief executive Hamdi Ulukaya announced that starting in 2017, all...
Closed for Thanksgiving: Will Others Follow Mall of America's Lead?
The holiday-shopping madness of Black Friday has crept earlier and earlier in recent years, as retailers have opened for business on Thanksgiving Day. That trend could be reversing, however, if other shopping centers follow Mall of America's lead.The...
Collapse of Diplomacy in Syria Forces US to Consider New Options
When President Obama threatened military strikes on Syrian government installations over chemical weapons in 2012, Russia took notice.Intent on heading off a United States military intervention that could have weakened Moscow ally and Syrian President...
Columbus Day or Indigenous Peoples' Day? Cities Have Their Say
Are you celebrating Columbus Day on Monday?Inhabitants of US cities from Santa Cruz, Calif., to Belfast, Maine, will instead observe Indigenous Peoples' Day next week. On Wednesday, as Phoenix, Ariz., became the largest city to make the switch, Bostonians...
Could Word Power Save Us from Road Rage?
Who knew that a Walt Disney cartoon made years before there even was an Interstate Highway System could provide profound insights into road rage? "Motor Mania," from 1950, stars the irrepressible Goofy (and is widely available on YouTube). The cartoon...
Discovering the Truth That Helps and Heals
Throughout the world, people and countries celebrate meaningful discoveries. In the United States, for instance, Columbus Day is celebrated on the second Monday of October. Though explorer Christopher Columbus wasn't the first to discover the "New World," many...
First Strike in 33 Years: Why Harvard's Food Service Workers Walked Out
Jack Barbosa wears a chef's hat and an ear-to-ear smile as he stands outside Annenberg Hall on Harvard University's Cambridge, Mass., campus. As picketers march and chant across the street, he helps hold a series of large banners spelling out the slogan "Support...
Forbes List Boasts More Immigrants Than Ever. Is the American Dream Alive?
On the Forbes 400 list of the richest Americans this year, a record 10 percent are immigrants.While some social observers lament that the "American dream" is dead, the number of immigrants gracing the list suggests that it may still be possible to start...
Hospitality Marks the Next UN Chief
For 10 years, before the Security Council picked him to be the United Nations secretary-general starting in 2017, Antonio Guterres was the UN high commissioner for refugees. The former Portuguese leader traveled to dozens of countries that had taken...
How Far Have Women in Sports Media Really Come?
When minor league baseball player Brooks Marlow tweeted Wednesday night that "no lady," especially sports broadcaster Jessica Mendoza, "needs to be on ESPN talking during a baseball game," reactions ran the gamut from disgust to condemnation to arguments...
How Floridians Are Preparing for Hurricane Matthew
Hurricane Matthew, the strongest storm to hit the Caribbean in almost a decade, is strengthened to a Category 4 hurricane Thursday, with sustained winds ranging from 130 mph to 156 mph. It is forecast to dump 7 to 10 inches of rain, and produce 9-foot...
How Otter Pelts Are Revolutionizing Wetsuit Technology
The sunny beaches of summer are already losing their popularity, as increasingly chilly waters drive vacationers to less frigid pursuits. Cold water has long challenged humans, who have no natural defenses against a wintry marine environment.Beavers...
'Inclusive and Equitable' Education Calls for 69 Million More Teachers, Says UN
In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals laid out by the United Nations for the next 14 years, 69 million new teachers will be needed around the globe, according to statistics released Wednesday by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization...
Is It Time to Take a Second Look at Stop-and-Frisk?
Clark Pena remembers the "bad old days" here in East Harlem, when crack cocaine and its accompanying street violence made his neighborhood a difficult place to live.And the longtime community advocate is adamant that the tide began to change when the...
Is the Glass Ceiling Starting to Crack? Yes and No, Study Finds
Despite extensive gains in civil rights and social standing, many American women still feel trapped beneath the proverbial glass ceiling, where they face discrimination in both promotions and pay.But a Pew Research Center study released on Thursday shows progress:...
Methane, Methane Everywhere: More Comes from Fossil Fuels
The fossil fuel industry may be emitting twice as much methane as previously thought, a new study finds.After carbon dioxide, methane is considered the second biggest source of manmade greenhouse gases. The study's authors have pulled together the most...
New Fault Line Discovered in CA, Offering Hope of Better Quake Models
Seismologists in California have discovered evidence of a new fault fault line that runs along the eastern edge of the inland Salton Sea, parallel to the infamous San Andreas fault (SSAF), according to research published this week. Up until now the Salton...
New 'Jackie' Trailer: Why Do Oscars Highlight Actors Playing Real People?
A new trailer has been released for the upcoming biopic "Jackie," which stars Natalie Portman and could find the actress as the latest person to be nominated for an Academy Award for playing a real person. "Jackie" stars Ms. Portman as former first lady...
NY Archdiocese Offers Compensation for Abuse Victims, but Critics Protest
A compensation program unveiled Thursday by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York will offer money to victims of sexual abuse if they agree by Jan. 31 to forgo lawsuits and work with an independent mediator instead.Cardinal Timothy Dolan announced...
On Display at California Senate Debate: Future of Democratic Party
When college senior Sofia Lopez learned her school was hosting the only debate ahead of the election for California's open United States Senate seat, she jumped at the chance to watch. Partly, she just wanted to learn more about the race, which has been...
PCBs in Schools: US Needs to Invest in Its Classrooms, Report Says
Up to 14 million American school students sitting in aging classrooms could be exposed to unsafe levels of toxic chemicals that were banned almost 40 years ago, according to a new report.Now, some environmental and health experts are calling for a federal...
Polish Lawmakers Defeat Proposal to Further Limit Abortion
On Thursday, Polish lawmakers listened to tens of thousands of women who had taken to the streets in protest this week, and rejected a proposed law make all abortions illegal by a 352-58 vote.Poland already has some of the most restrictive abortion laws...
She Takes an Eco-Friendly Approach to Helping Homeless People
On a late summer morning, things are buzzing - both literally and figuratively - at EarthLinks, which sits on a corner lot that used to provide parking for the nearby stadium of the Denver Broncos.Visitors are greeted with the subtle aroma of the well-tended, colorful...
Songwriter Rod Temperton Wrote Classic Pop Track 'Thriller'
Rod Temperton, who died last week, was a songwriter who is likely best known for writing the ultra-popular Michael Jackson song "Thriller." Mr. Temperton also penned songs such as the Heatwave song "Boogie Nights" and the Jackson's song "Rock with You."The...
Tarsier Genome Reveals Clues about Our Oddball Primate Relative
Enormous eyes bulge out of the swiveling heads of tarsiers - primates so tiny that they can fit in a human hand. The animal's spiny fingers and toes help them grip onto the trees they sleep in by day, and their muscular hind legs and elongated ankle...
'The Nix' Cleverly Mixes Politics and a Troubled Mother-Son Relationship
Nathan Hill has remarkable timing. He started writing his debut novel, The Nix, 12 years ago, but it's hard to imagine it could have been more topical if he'd begun 12 weeks ago.In 2011, a woman flings some rocks at an anti-immigrant politician, Governor...
Wal-Mart Boosts E-Commerce over More Brick-and-Mortar Stores
Ahead of a meeting with investors on Thursday, Wal-Mart said it planned to scale back plans to open up new stores in favor of investing more in e-commerce, as the retail giant tries to fend off online competition from Amazon.Wal-Mart has installed mobile...
What Kinds of Vegetables Can We Grow on Mars?
With Elon Musk and NASA planning to send humans to Mars in the next 10-15 years, food scientists have taken on another step of the planning process: figuring out what astronauts will eat on the Red Planet. Such a journey may take up to two and a half...
What's Making President Obama's Approval Ratings Go Up?
President Obama's approval ratings have hit 55 percent, marking the highest point in his second term and continuing a seventh-month stretch in which more than half the country has approved of him.The steady streak is significant for Mr. Obama, whose...
Why Coal-Dependent Poland Signed the Paris Climate Agreement
The European Union officially ratified the Paris climate agreement on Wednesday, along with several member nations. Among them was a most unlikely signatory: Poland, whose reliance on coal had previously threatened the deal.Developing nations have been...
Why McDonald's Workers in More Than 30 Cities Plan to Protest
In more than 30 US cities on Thursday afternoon, McDonald's customers may see some workers taking their orders wearing signs that read "McDonald's, Hands Off My Buns" or "McDonald's, Put Some Respect in My Check."Their protest, according to The Guardian,...
Why the New UN Head Faces High Expectations on Refugee Crisis
Faced with the worst refugee crisis since World War II, when the United Nations was founded, the UN is widely expected to select a new Secretary General whose resume and rhetoric appreciates the interests of individual countries while prioritizing displaced people....
Will Michelle Obama's White House Garden Survive the Next Presidency?
Presidents, they come and go. But first lady Michelle Obama wants her garden to stay at the White House once she leaves in four months.Mrs. Obama unveiled a much larger version of the garden Wednesday, with concrete, stone, and steel to root it on the...
Will the University of Michigan's New Diversity Programs Work?
The University of Michigan will invest $85 million over the next five years to increase diversity among its students and staff, the school's president announced two days after hundreds of its staff attended a rally against a series of racially-charged...
Working-Class, White Men See Incomes Drop: How Is That Changing America?
Income levels among white men without a college education have dropped by nine percent over the past two decades, according to a new study by Sentier Research, contributing to ongoing concerns about the working class in America.The study, which examined...
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