The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 30, 2001

Arkansas Gets Ready for a 'Bumper' Crop of Bookworms
Rachel Graves, a sixth-grader in the small town of Huttig, Ark., pored over education posters to search for the exact look she wanted for a new Arkansas license plate. Her work paid off when her drawing - a pile of brightly colored textbooks topped...
Big Contracts Face Renewal in 2001 That Will Test the Muscle of Unions ; If Economy Slows, the Number of Strikes Is Likely to Decline as Workers Lose Leverage
After a seven-week strike - some of it involving picketing in sub- zero temperatures - Emil Fritz is glad to be back at work. Union leaders "got what they were asking for - better wages for new hirees and the guaranteed health benefits," says Mr....
Booting Ecstasy out of Military ; despite High-Profile Court-Martial Today, Drug Use in Military Is at a Record Low
Cadet 1st Class Stephen Pouncey faces a court-martial today that could land him in the brig for 55 years. The Air Force Academy senior is accused of dealing ecstasy and LSD, and using them, in addition to cocaine and methamphetamines. The severity...
Bush's Promising Start, Clinton's Sorry Exit
Let's consider the coming of George W. Bush and the going of Bill Clinton. The new president. He's off to a good start with a speech that set just the right tone, calling for unity and civility. It was not a speech that will ring down the ages, like...
Business & Finance
A recession "most likely" is already under way in the US and will be countered with sharp interest-rate cuts by the Federal Reserve, billionaire currency speculator George Soros told the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, Switzerland. Soros also...
Conviction in East Timor Falls Short of Calls for Justice ; the First Case Connected to Violence after the 1999 Vote Shows the Challenges for International Courts
Almost trembling as he awaits a decision, Joao Fernandes, barely literate and desperately poor, looked nothing like the cold-blooded killer described in the indictment against him. Last Thursday, Mr. Fernandes became the first person to be brought...
Everyone's Shepherd ; A Spiritual Look at Issues of Interest to Young People
I grew up in a beautiful part of the world - Africa. It has hot sunshine, wide blue skies, waving grasslands, and soft sandy beaches. The flowers seem to like the warmth and are more red and yellow and blue than those I've seen in other places. We...
Give Vouchers to Rehab Poor Juvenile Delinquents
President Bush has just submitted an education package to Congress that endorses the use of vouchers for students in failing schools. While the concept of vouchers has provoked concern among supporters of the public schools, it nonetheless raises...
Ground Zero for Congo Peace ; Repeatedly Overrun by Warring Factions, the Kivu Province Is the Sorest Point in Congo's Conflicts
If peace is to come to this vast country at the heart of Africa, it will have to start here in the region known as the Kivus, a place as beautiful as it is tortured. North and South Kivu provinces are nestled against Lake Kivu, a body of water about...
How the Plans Stack Up
President Bush and congressional Democrats, led by Sens. Joseph Lieberman of Connecticut and Evan Bayh of Indiana, proposed separate plans last week to reform education. Here's a comparison of key points: Closing the achievement gap The Bush Plan...
Life on Mars? the Answer Might Just Be in Arkansas
Biology professor Tim Kral won't argue with anyone if they call his fascination with Mars an obsession. He loves the Red Planet, with its average temperature of -60 degrees C and atmosphere that's 95 percent carbon monoxide. In Professor Kral's ...
Mexico Declares War against Drug Traffickers ; President Fox's Crusade Is Part of a Promised Effort toward National Renewal
Promising more resources and fresh law-enforcement battalions, Mexican President Vicente Fox has declared a "war without mercy" against drug trafficking. Everyone has heard that before. But this time there are signs that someone from the opposing...
New Union Chief Puts Different Face on LAPD
Call her Donna Reed in a duster. A former pastry chef, soccer manager, and mother of two, Mitzi Grasso insists that either she or her husband be with their children whenever they're not in school. She cooks steamed mussels and garlic linguini on ...
PBS Series Conveys the Texture of Teaching
Teachers frequently find themselves in the glare of the media spotlight these days, but little of that attention is positive. Discussion tends to center on what can be done to hold them more accountable or to press them to ratchet up test scores....
Power Troubles Snowball in Russia ; Record Cold Has Collapsed Power Grids. Next Year Could Be Worse
The floor in Marina Gladkaya's bedroom is caked with ice, where a hard freeze caused the radiator to burst. Bundled up and wearing insulated boots, Ms. Gladkaya now sleeps on the floor of the sitting room across the hall, where there is a small plug-in heater....
Raw Materials for Life May Predate Earth's Formation ; A NASA Team Suggests That Space - Not Just Conditions on Earth - Provided Key Ingredients for Organic Life
As scientists piece together the story of how life began on Earth, they often point to sunlight, volcanoes, and lightning as the energetic chaperones pushing simple molecules to link and begin their dance, ultimately forming one-celled organisms....
Readers Write
If parents have voucher choice, why not taxpayers? As a taxpayer without children, who has never complained about paying for education, I am curious to know if the Bush administration has a provision for me to "sell" vouchers. I realize that a voucher...
Stretching Time for Schools ; Longer Days, Longer School Year May Be Long Overdue
Anyone with school-age kids knows that a demanding schedule for education - classes, extracurricular activities, and homework - must run like clockwork. And yet rarely, does it seem, are there enough hours to perform all these learning activities...
Ten Years Later, Iraq Suffers Proudly ; Years of Sanctions Have Left Iraq's Economic Structure in a Shambles, but the Resolve of Its People Seems Undented
Wearing an artfully trimmed goatee and a shirt labeled "Versace," Hazim Dawood is out for an evening stroll along the magnificent illusion known as Baghdad's Karrada Street. Sidewalk vendors neatly display everything from white doilies for the table...
The Teachers' Take ; Educators around the Country Respond to the President's Sweeping Proposals for Reform in America's Schools
For Steven Platte, the subject of improving education is inevitably tied up in precedent. A 14-year veteran at Kirkwood High School in St. Louis, he's seen reforms come and go. All the current talk about more testing and vouchers, spurred by President...
The Unsung Tale of a River's Restoration ; A Movement to Remove Obsolete Dams Gathers Force in the East - and Fishermen Are First to Take Notice
Tearing down the Quaker Neck Dam in Goldsboro, N.C., yielded some immediate results: The unclogging of the Neuse River opened more than 900 miles of blocked spawning grounds to once-ousted Atlantic ambassadors like shad, striped bass, and even sturgeon....
USA
Auto giant DaimlerChrysler announced 26,000 job cuts at its US- based Chrysler unit in an effort to turn around the floundering division. The cuts, which represent one-fifth of the company's North American work force, will occur over the next three...
Who Might Get Lower Prescription-Drug Costs? ; Bush Plan Targets Aid to Poor Seniors, but Democrats Want Broader Coverage
Rolling out proposals as if on a public-policy assembly line, the White House yesterday unveiled its plan for a prescription-drug benefit - the second major legislative initiative in less than two weeks. The plan, called an "immediate helping hand,"...
Women of Color Meet at the Meridians
Kum-Kum Bhavnani has a sparse office, but with manuscripts making their way to her desk from all over the world, it won't stay pile- free for long. Dr. Bhavnani came to Smith College last July as a visiting professor and editor of a new journal,...
World
Help from any other country, including rival Pakistan, would be welcome in the aftermath of last week's earthquake, Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee said. He toured areas hardest hit by the temblor, pledging $108 million in federal aid to...
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