The Christian Science Monitor

The Christian Science Monitor is a national weekly print newspaper published by the Christian Science Publishing Society and owned by the First Church of Christ, Scientist. The paper was a daily until March, 2009; currently the website is updated daily. First published in 1908, the Christian Science Monitor is headquartered in Boston, Mass.The average age of a Christian Science Monitor reader is 59, and 61 percent of the readers are women. The average household income of the newspapers readers is just under $94,000; over 72 percent have a four-year college degree and more than 40 percent have a post-graduate degree. It covers national and international news. The Christian Science Monitor is not a religious paper. The Christian Science Monitor has won seven Pulitzer Prizes since 1950. The most recent was in 2002 for an editorial cartoon. In 2006, one of the paper's freelance reporters, Jill Carroll was kidnapped in Iraq. She was released after 82 days. The paper has also won other awards, including the National Headliner Award, National Society of Newspaper Columnists awards, and the Reporters and Editors Award. Mary Trammell is the Editor-in-Chief, Jonathan Wells is the Publisher, John Yemma is the Editor and Marshall Ingwerson is the Managing Editor.

Articles from September 20, 2001

A Life without Participles Dangling ; H.W. Fowler Literally Wrote the Book on English Usage
In the world of words, where Webster stands for dictionary, Fowler stands for English usage. So it's not surprising that when Oxford published a completely revised reference on usage a few years ago, it was labeled "The New Fowler's Modern English...
Americans Donate Dollars to Victims by the Bootful
In Washington, firefighters are conducting a "boot drive." At rush hour, they're asking passersby to fill fire boots with cash for the needy families of New York rescue workers. In New Orleans, a television fundraising effort collected $300,000 in...
A More Dangerous Afghanistan
Afghan resistance leader Ahmed Shah Massoud had long been a critic of Osama bin Laden, the prime suspect in the Sept. 11 attacks. Mr. Massoud had also long warned of the danger that Afghanistan, Mr. bin Laden's base, was increasingly controlled by...
An Everest of Debris to Move, Piece by Piece
For weary workers, it's simply called "the pile." They've been at their task, to sort through and remove, piece by piece, this Everest of twisted steel and dull-gray debris, for more than a week now. But as hope for finding survivors fades, the cleanup...
Borne by a Poet and His Barrow
I don't know where William Carlos Williams was when he wrote his famous poem about the red wheelbarrow - probably in some fertile farmyard. But even in this South African semidesert in which I have lived for the past seven years, his words have a...
Cities Gird for 'Bio' Attacks ; Experts Say Terrorists Are Increasingly Likely to Try Using Weapons of Mass Destruction
Terrorists proved they can hit multiple American targets simultaneously with what amounts to conventional weapons: fuel- heavy airliners used as giant napalm bombs. The questions that now worry officials and private defense specialists, after last...
Costliest Disaster in US History ; Financial Toll Passes $60 Billion, Reaching from Wreckage and Airport Downtime to Lower Productivity and Lost Taxes
Never has so little cost so much. The 19 hijackers and their accomplices had modest expenses: rental cars, motel rooms, and about $50,000 for airline tickets on Sept. 11. A few attended flight school. But in one short week, their terrible attacks...
Death of Literature? Not Just Yet. ; Concern in the Book Industry over Ads in Novels and Tracking Sales Is Misplaced
Before Sept. 11, the threat that most concerned the publishing industry in New York City was the encroachment of commercial practices into its otherwise cloistered business. From a scanning system that will track what books are selling and where ...
Deftness Where It's Needed
The Bush administration's first string - including Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vice President Dick Cheney, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, and the president himself - is showing the world that acting with resolve does not mean acting with...
If Ahab Only Knew: Cetaceans (Whales) Descend from Hoofed Mammals
Rudyard Kipling delighted generations with his tale of how the whale got its throat. But he left a larger question: How did the ocean get its whale? This week, two teams of paleontologists report finding fossils they say will help answer that question...
Life under Taliban Cuts Two Ways
Karim has never known anything but a world of war. At the age of 2, he watched the Soviet Union's occupation force retreat from Kabul after a decade-long guerrilla war. When he was 4, his family fled their mud-brick house as shelling from two rival Afghan...
Mom's Kitchen Bowls Hold Memories, Too
I had no idea I was nostalgic about my mother's kitchen until I spied that first set of Pyrex mixing bowls on the bottom shelf of a dusty Boston antique store a decade ago. Until then, I'd been content to do my stirring in the stainless- steel bowls...
New Risks with Mideast Cease-Fire ; as Israel and Palestinians Work to Maintain Tuesday's Cease-Fire, Political Fractures Widen
Reverberations from the Sept. 11 attacks in New York and Washington are changing the status quo of tit-for-tat violence in the Middle East. The question is whether those changes will last. Israelis and Palestinians moved to ease tensions this week...
Parents out of E-Loop ; Password-Protected Chatrooms Leave Teens Alone in Cyberspace
The mother of a 15-year-old boy calls Joshua Finer to buy software the computer whiz has designed to allow parents to monitor children's computer activity. She has a "small" problem. Her son has installed a password on the computer itself, so she can't...
Park Proposal Stays Afloat, an Acre at a Time
Roxanne Quimby moved to Maine in 1975 with $3,000 and a yen to live close to the land. Now, having made a mint in her own line of natural skin-care products, Burt's Bees, she's a multimillionaire with big plans for her fortune. Ms. Quimby, it seems,...
Pulling History out of a Hat ; Glen David Gold Tells the Story of Carter the Great and America
Vaudeville is back. But don't look to the stage; look to the page. For the second time this month, the curtain is rising on a delightful novel about entertainment before television and movies. First, Elizabeth McCracken played the straight man in...
Rewrite the Book on Combating Terrorism
For decades, terrorists have savaged innocents with attacks. From bullet-spraying assault guns to poison gases in subways, Americans may have thought they'd seen it all. Until Sept. 11. Though terrorism has evolved, the federal and international strategies...
The E in Terrorism
The connection between terrorism and the Internet is just beginning to be understood. There's some evidence that the perpetrators of the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington had been using e-mail, presumably to stay in touch with each other...
The Struggle for the Soul of Muslim Youth ; What Version of Islam Gets Taught Has Global Consequences
It's an event that might occur in any family - capturing a child's imagination and sending him in a new direction, perhaps shaping a lifetime. A young boy in Lahore, Pakistan, often told his uncle that he wanted to grow up to join the Army and kill...
TV Journalism under Attack!
Television coverage of Sept. 11 and its aftermath has been deeply troubling. While it is appropriate that major networks have preempted commercials, these same TV news operations resorted to entertainment conventions that exploit the dramatic elements...
USA
President Bush and his top cabinet members were meeting with a parade of world leaders to gain the widest possible support for a crackdown on terrorism. French President Jacques Chirac said he favored retaliation if its strategy were first agreed...
Why It's Hard for CIA to Fight Terrorism ; Finding Enough Recruits and Infiltrating Organizations Will Require Shift in Culture
For all the talk in Washington of waging "war" on terrorism, the biggest impact in thwarting future attacks against the United States may not come from cruise missiles or ground troops scouring Pleistocene caves for Osama bin Laden. It will come from...
World
For the first time, Afghanistan's Taliban regime conceded that Osama bin Laden could have been involved in last week's terrorism attacks against the US and said it was ready for new discussions with the Bush administration. But as a grand council...
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