Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, Fall

Bang-Up! Theatricality and the "Diphrelatic Art" in De Quincey's English Mail-Coach
This article examines implicit connections between Thomas De Quincey's The English Mail-Coach and the English popular stage during the first two decades of the nineteenth century. At this time, London included among its entertainments equestrian spectacles,...
Charles Lamb as the Janus of Romanticism in "New Year's Eve"
Lamb's "New Year's Eve" has a three-part structure, each movement marked by an allusion to New Year's bells: Elia's looking back nostalgically to childhood; looking forward with aversion to death; and, finally, reemploying Charles Cotton's mythological...
De Quincey's Liminal Interspaces: "On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts"
In his 1854 "Postscript," the last of three essays collectively titled "On murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts," Thomas De Quincey uses the iconography of doors and thresholds to explore the dynamics of transgressive violence. Such liminal sites...
Dibdin, Kelly, and the Spectacle of Self
The realities of running a theatre and putting up productions achieve imaginative form in Michael Kelly's Reminiscences (1826) and in Thomas Diblin's Reminiscences (1827). These personal histories detail the history and spectacle of Georgian and Regency...
From the Editor
The Fall 2001 issue of Nineteenth-Century Prose gives a variety of perspectives on Romantic autobiography, biography, memoirs, and essays, as well as a broad spectrum of reviews. Both the articles and the reviews are arranged chronologically, and from...
Keeping Romanticism English: Thomas De Quincey Meets Allan Cunningham
This article closely examines Thomas De Quincey's account of his meeting with the Scottish poet and essayist Allan Cunningham. Read in light of recent critical attention to De Quincey's role as a popularizer and disseminator of canonical Romantic literature...
Metaphor as a Structural Principle and a Vehicle of Social Criticism in Essays by Lamb and Hazlitt
The essays of Charles Lamb and William Hazlitt contain many metaphors, similes, and poetic images that emphasize and develop important ideas, serve as a structural principle in paragraphs and entire pieces, and often imply criticism of the writers'...
Plebeian Gusto, Negative Capability, and the Low Company of "Mr. Kean": Keats' Dramatic Review for the Champion (21 December 817)
Keats' review of Edmund Kean for the Champion (21 December 1817) can be seen as itself a dramatic performance in which Keats, in an energetic prose attuned to the expressive spontaneity of his subject, portrays "Edmund Kean," or more accurately, portrays...
Reading Romantic Autobiography
The flourishing of autobiographical writing in something like its modern form--a continuous narrative of individual self-representation - has often been linked, chronologically and thematically (or ideologically), with "Romanticism." Looking closely...
Sacred Secrets: Romantic Biography, Romantic Reform
Most critics from the Romantic period to our own rime attack William Godwin for the effect that his biography of Mary Wollstonecraff had on her reputation. This article argues, however, that there is more to this "mistake" than sheer social ineptilude...