Nineteenth-Century Prose

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 1, Spring

"A Tribute of Respect to the Dead": Narrative Containment and Focal Substitution in Leopold McClintock's "The Voyage of the 'Fox'"
In 1859, Captain Leopold McClintock was lauded as a hero upon his return to England from a two-year Arctic expedition that was declared by the Athenaeum as "one of the most important voyages ever made in the Arctic Seas" (24 December 1859, 845). McClintock...
De Quincey, Coleridge, and the Literary Model of Habit
This essay argues that Thomas De Quincey defines 'authentic' opium habituation as the effective management of one's own personal slavery, and he uses Samuel Taylor Coleridge as a straw man to illustrate the perils of unmanaged, 'illegitimate' opium...
Emerson and the Gothic
Although typically recognized for his Transcendental idealism, Ralph Waldo Emerson was also deeply engaged with the Gothic, a literary mode that prior to the Civil War ran parallel to Transcendentalism but is rarely used in the same breath with Emerson,...
From the Editor
The present issue of Nineteenth-Century Prose has been a long time in the making: several of the articles have been waiting in queue for nearly three years. The reason is not hard to discover: Sara Atwood's fine Special Issue on John Ruskin (38/2),...
Man's Best Fiend: Evolution, Rabies, and the Gothic Dog
My essay examines late-Victorian Gothic literature in the light of the rabies 'epidemic' that took place in the latter half of the nineteenth century. It offers an historical contextual background to the shape-shifting trope in Gothic fiction at the...
"My Name Is the Right One" Lady Elizabeth (Rigby) Eastlake's Professional Art Criticism
This paper examines an influential but now neglected Victorian critic: Lady Elizabeth (Rigby) Eastlake (1809-1893). Eastlake developed a sizeable reputation beginning in the 1840s as a travel writer and art critic. She was an expert on German culture...
Road to the Golden Age: Thoreau's Old Carlisle Road
Randall Conrad draws upon ideas from science, mythology, theology, psychology, folklore, and women's fashion notes from the mid-nineteenth century to elucidate "The Old Carlisle Road," a 330-word passage that is usually considered the most obscure...
Vernon Lee, Oscar Wilde, and the Dialogue of "New Aesthetics"
Later versions of Oscar Wilde's "The Decay of Lying" subtitle the essay "An Observation," but when it originally appeared in the Nineteenth Century, Wilde's treatise on aesthetics called itself "A Dialogue." And a dialogue it is, a conversation held...
Virgin and Child with John: Ruskin's Typical Romance
John Ruskin, in Venice in 1876 to study some frescoes depicting St. Ursula, began having visions of St. Ursula herself, accompanied by the spirit of Rose La Touche. Van Akin Burd publicized these visions in his Christmas Story over twenty years ago,...
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