Journal of Markets & Morality

The Journal of Markets & Mortality is a professional journal published semiannually by the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty. The journal focuses on the scientific and theological relationships between economics and morality.

Articles from Vol. 3, No. 2, Fall

Controversy: Are Strong Protections of Private Property Rights Necessary for Species Preservation?
The protection of endangered species is a biblically mandated responsibility for Christians and Jews. The Scriptures declare that all land is owned first by God; humans are stewards who act on behalf of God and in obedience to His commandments. The...
Ecological Confusion among the Clergy
Clergy and religious organizations increasingly take positions on environmental policy issues. By adopting a deviation-from-pristine-nature standard for judging human stewardship, they believe an environmental crisis threatens God's good garden. They...
Environmental Theology: A Judeo-Christian Defense
Much of the modern environmental movement has found it necessary to develop new theologies of nature and humanity. However, the traditional beliefs of Judaism and Christianity provide a better perspective on nature and offer ample grounding for a realistic...
Human Rights and the Rights of Nature
With human rights issues increasingly in the news (the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration, the Pinochet case, and more), we have seen a renewed interest in extending the concept of rights to nonhuman entities. Despite the well-established...
Liberty and the Place of Man in Nature
From the very beginning of humanity, it has been human nature to strive to create more favorable environments in which to live. It is in our nature, then, to live in artificial environments. Over the millennia, we have come to see that the best environment...
On the Choice of Method in Economics: Options for Humanists: A Response to Gregory Gronbacher
This essay continues a dialogue concerning the problems that Christian personalism will face in efforts to work with the Chicago, Public Choice, and Austrian Schools of economics. These problems ought not be dismissed as recognizable only out of a...