ARIEL

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 2-3, April-July

"A Knife through Time": Robert Sullivan's Star Waka and the Politics and Poetics of Cultural Difference
Media coverage of cultural and economic matters in Aotearoa-New Zealand strongly indicates that Maori--and more broadly Pacific--cultures are 'hot properties' in national and international music, literature, fashion, art, decor, and cuisine, not to...
Blue Be-Longing: A Discussion of Olive Senior's Latest Collection of Poetry, over the Roofs of the World
In the twelfth annual Philip Sherlock Lecture, delivered in February 2005 at the University of the West Indies (Mona, Jamaica), Olive Senior spoke about the journey she had undertaken to becoming 'a woman-of-words,' and established the connection between...
In a Transnational World: Exploring Gendered Subjectivity, Mobility, and Consumption in Anita Desai's Fasting, Feasting
Triumphalist versions of globalization often celebrate the possibilities presented by increased mobility and travel in an interconnected world, foregrounding cosmopolitanism, the rise of global cities, and the pathways taken by elite classes of marketable...
Jamaican Ladies and Tropical Charms
In her novel Voyage in the Dark, Jean Rhys' West Indian protagonist Anna Morgan reflects on the hallucinogenic distance between her Dominican home and the England to which she has been transplanted: "Sometimes it was as if I were back there and as...
Language in Chinese Canadian Writing: Impact on Interpretation and Reception
When one group finds it difficult to stand up and say its name; when to say one's identity is already to mark one as lesser than, that is where the boundaries of exile begin. (Shirley Geok-lin Lim, Afterword 168) The very choice of the language...
Mapmaking and the Spatial Politics of Power in Thea Astley's Hunting the Wild Pineapple
Let me draw you a little map. So begins Thea Astley's short story sequence Hunting the Wild Pineapple, and so begins this exploration of Astley's text, in which I will endeavor to draw a "little map" of the "politics and ideology" (Soja 6) encoded...
Producing the Colonial Subject: Romantic Pedagogy and Mimicry in Jamaica Kincaid's Writing
Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge: it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all Science. Emphatically may it be said of the Poet, as Shakespeare has said of man, 'that he looks before and after.' He...
Singapore's New Thrillers: Boldly Going beyond the Ethnographic Map
Douglas Chua's The Missing Page, published by Angsana Books in Singapore in 1999, opens with the construction of a massive development project to link Singapore with Malaysia through a tunnel "modelled after the 51 km Eurotunnel" (14). But the workers...
Unsuspecting Storyteller and Suspect Listener: A Postcolonial Reading of Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre
After being widely celebrated as the cult text in the decades following the second wave of feminism, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre has now become one of the paradigmatic texts of postcolonial studies. The novel is the most widely discussed Victorian...
"You Ain No Real-Real Bajan Man": Patriarchal Performance and Feminist Discourse in Paule Marshall's Brown Girl, Brownstones
As the titles of many of her writings (Brown Girl, Brownstones, Praisesong for the Widow, Daughters) might suggest, Paule Marshall's career has been preoccupied with the concerns and difficulties that women, particularly non-white women, face in American...
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