Southeastern Geographer

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 4, Winter

Emerging Patterns of Growth and Change in the Southeast
Research on economic growth and change in the South has traditionally focused on disparities between wealthy suburbs and impoverished rural areas. Focusing on the economic duality of the South belies the fact that most places are middle class with...
Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation
The modern study of the American South has undergone a decade long resurgence in Geography and has come to be defined by questions of inequality and social justice. This resurgence represents an innovative approach to geographic scholarship, the outlines...
Innovations in Southern Studies within Geography
In the late 1930s, the Committee on Geographic Research of the National Research Council and the Association of American Geographers developed the "Southern Studies Project." The Project proposed to use geographical research to address economic, social,...
Introduction: With Thanks
The Southeastern Geographer is moving north. Our four-year term as editors comes to an end with this issue and volume 52 will see the journal reside in the very capable hands and minds of Carl "Andy" Reese and David Cochran at the University of Southern...
Jim Crow, Civil Defense, and the Hydrogen Bomb: Race, Evacuation Planning, and the Geoplastics of Fear in 1950s Savannah, Georgia
In 1950, in the beginning phases of the Cold War, the U.S. Congress passed the Federal Civil Defense Act with the goal of protecting civilian populations in case of nuclear conflict. By the mid-1950s civil defense officials were busy developing detailed...
Representing the Immigrant: Social Movements, Political Discourse, and Immigration in the U.S. South
This article examines the ways that the figure of the immigrant is understood and mobilized in political discourses and social movements surrounding immigration in the South. Drawing on both immigrant-related movements and scholarly discussions of...
The Bible Belt in a Changing South: Shrinking, Relocating, and Multiple Buckles
The term "Bible Belt," a familiar label associated with religion in the South, was coined by journalist H.L. Mencken following his coverage of the Scopes "monkey" trial in Dayton, Tennessee in 1925. It has been used regularly since that time to refer...
The Politics of Mobility in the South: A Commentary on Sprawl, Automobility, and the Gulf Oil Spill
During the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico there were discourses that urged a reduction in America's oil dependency by reducing driving. Yet in the South proposals to limit drilling, conservation, and especially reduced driving,...
Water, Water, Everywhere? toward a Critical Water Geography of the South
Geographers have long been interested in Southern studies and social justice is a common theme in this literature. Traditionally, social justice writing has focused on the plight of the poor and ethnic minorities. Yet human-environment interaction,...