The Comparatist

Articles from Vol. 34, May

Books Received
Alexander, James. Shaw's Controversial Socialism. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2009. Baranski, Zygmunt G. and Theodore J. Cachey, Jr,. eds. Petrarch and Dante. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2009. Brown, Alison, Joseph...
Collecting and Translating the Non-Western Other: The Perils and Possibilities of a World Literature Website
The founders of the website "Words Without Borders: The Online Magazine for International Literature"--at the url www.wordswithoutborders.org--launched in July 2003 and funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts and W. W. Norton, are not...
Comparative Constructs
This year's issue of The Comparatist centers around two thematic clusters. The first cluster grows out of a panel offered two years ago at the American Comparative Literature Association annual meeting. It addresses the relationship between Comparative...
Comparative Literature versus World Literature
Recent theories and pedagogies of alterity such as multiculturalism and postcolonialism have had a significant impact on the discipline of Comparative Literature and the teaching of World Literature. They have, in many institutions, taken over the...
Comparative Scholarship/worldly Teaching
Early in our careers, I suspect, many comparatists have had to ask, "What are we supposed to teach?" For me this issue first surfaced during a job interview with a university that was building comparative literature by piggy-backing new hires partly...
"Either a Hermeneutical Consciousness or a Critical Consciousness": Renegotiating Theories of the Germany-India Encounter
In his 1973 essay "Hermeneutics and the Critique of Ideology," Paul Ricoeur articulates the demands of the human sciences by recalling what he referred to as "the fundamental gesture of philosophy": Is this gesture an avowal of the historical conditions...
Indo-German Connections, Critical and Hermeneutical, in the First World War
The questions that Edward Said raised in Orientalism are still unresolved regarding the German interest in India. Said himself mostly excluded German Orientalism from his critique of the British and French intellectual project of domination over the...
Introduction: New Models for Indo-German Scholarship within the Critical Reappraisal of Orientalism
The study of German Orientalism has had a conflicted relationship with the Saidian mode of inquiry, from Edward Said's initial omission of the German role in Orientalism in his pioneering 1978 book to his later rejoinders to his critics, which further...
Lilian Renee Furst: 1931-2009
Lilian R. Furst, Marcel Bataillon Professor of Comparative Literature, emerita, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, died at her home in Chapel Hill on September 11, 2009. Lilian taught at Chapel Hill from 1986 to 2005 and for many...
Literature and Language
Early in their careers, most comparatists no doubt have faced the challenging task of explaining to curious interlocutors what comparative literature as a discipline is. Part of the challenge of explaining the discipline is that over the decades since...
Looking at Goethe's Face
This paper attempts to change the "versus" in the title of the seminar in which this article originated, "World Literature versus Comparative Literature," into something less confrontational, reflecting on how the two fields can become mutually helpful....
Self-Othering in German Orientalism: The Case of Friedrich Schlegel
In the 1960s and '70s, a number of scholars began to pay careful attention to German cultural constructions of the "Orient" in the literary and philosophical works from the Baroque period to Romanticism. (1) However, with the publication of Orientalism...
To Compare, to World: Two Verbs, One Discipline
In a special 2004 issue of Comparative Literature Studies devoted to "World Literature and Globalization," I considered the possibilities of "world" as a verb, as a transitive verb, to be exact. (1) Once "to world" is read as transitive, the ensuing...
To Risk Immanence/to Read Schizo-Analytically: Deleuze, Guattari, and the Kleistian War-Machine
What a wide array of narrative arcs are inscribed in Heinrich von Kleist's Michael Kohlhaas: the story is a Baroque, textual architecture overlaid with the tight coils of a horse's braided mane; the cuneiform lettering of illuminated scripture; the...
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