Journal of Slavic Linguistics

Articles from Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring

1. Prelude
There are two polarity sensitive phenomena in Russian that rely in almost identical ways on the presence of negation in some local domain; both the Genitive of Negation (GoN) and ni-phrases like nikto 'nobody', nicego 'nothing', etc. are licensed by...
2. Ni-Phrases
In this section I argue for an at least partially syntactic approach to ni-phrase licensing. Section 2.1 looks at the scope properties of ni-phrases and concludes that no operator may scopally intervene between negation and ni-phrases. (8) Based on...
3. Genitive of Negation
This section investigates the syntactic licensing conditions for GoN and offers a (partial) solution. The discussion is necessarily brief and somewhat simplified. In a derivational model of syntax such as Chomsky's Minimalism, two questions need...
4. the Asymmetry between Ni-Phrases and GoN: A Conspiracy
This section discusses the logic of the conspiracy that leads to the emergence of typical EN effects, i.e., to sentences that allow GoN but disallow ni-phrases. I concentrate on the logic and on a particular paradigm christened "forced pleonastic negation"...
5. EN Triggers and Their Properties
The logic developed in the previous section demanded the assumption that negation in yes/no questions with li cannot reconstruct. This gives the complementizer a special role, since it must be the interrogative complementizer that prevents reconstruction....
6. Conclusion
In this paper I have investigated some asymmetries in the distribution of GoN and ni-phrases in Russian. The paradigms have previously been discussed under the heading of EN. A special variety of negation without negative force is invoked by these...
From the Editor
This first JSL issue of 2005 marks the long-awaited return to a normal production regimen. We have finally caught up and will henceforth keep to our avowed schedule of publishing two issues per year. I thank all those who have worked so hard to bring...
In Memoriam: Jordan Penchev
The Slavic linguistics community recently lost a valued and versatile colleague with the death of Jordan Penchev, on February 16, 2005. Jordan Penchev was a generative linguist in a time when transformational grammar had barely been heard of in...
On the Status of Parasitic Gaps in Bulgarian *
Abstract: This paper examines the likely candidates for the Parasitic Gap (PG) construction in Bulgarian. Focusing on the properties of PGs known from previously studied languages, I conclude that there are no genuine PGs in Bulgarian. I also argue...
Phonological Results of an Ancient Border Shift: Vocalic Mergers in Northeastern Slovenia
Abstract. The Slovene dialect area of Haloze, located to the southeast of Ptuj along the present Slovene-Croatian national border, is essentially part of the Pannonian Slovene dialect base, yet fieldwork documents an unexpected phonological development...
The Morphosyntax of Polish and Ukrainian -No/-to *
Abstract. This paper provides a detailed description of the Polish and Ukrainian -no/-to + accusative construction, with considerable attention paid to how the t1vo constructions differ and to their relevance for current morphological and syntactic...