British Art Journal

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 2, Autumn

Alexander Farmer (1825-69): A Male Artist Rediscovered
Two works by the genre painter Alexander Farmer (1825-1869) of Portchester House, Portchester, Hampshire, were bequeathed to the V&A in 1905 by the artist's sister, the watercolourist and miniature painter Emily Farmer (Pl 1). (1) The wording of...
Annals of the Fine Arts: James Elmes (1782-1862), Architect: From Youthful Editor to Aged Gospeller
The earliest popular art periodical in English, edited by James Elmes (Pl 3), has received little of the attention and analysis warranted by its contents. Published in the years following the victory of Waterloo and of the regency openness to the arts,...
Druids at Drayton: Dipping into Antiquarianism before the Society of Antiquaries (1717)
A set of three paintings at Drayton House is curious because it consists of images of druids (Pls 1, 2, 3). (1) As series of paintings thematically linked, they have common dimensions of 130 x 90 cm overall and a woodland setting is common to all three...
'Edward Lear: The Landscape Artist'
'Edward Lear: The landscape Artist' Wordsworth Trust, Dove Cottage, Grasmere 3 July-4 October 2009. If Edward Lear's name is associated with any landscape, it is with views of the near East. The exhibition recently held in Grasmere demonstrated...
'Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts'
'Endless Forms: Charles Darwin, Natural Science and the Visual Arts' Yale Centre for British Art 12 February-3 May 2009 Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge 16 June-4 October 2009 'Human kind', as TS Eliot observed, 'cannot bear too much reality',...
Four Letters by Sir Joshua Reynolds
Research for the exhibition Sir Joshua Reynolds: the Acquisition of Genius at Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery (21 November 2009 to 20 February 2010) has located four letters written by Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-92) among the papers of Sir Robert...
Intellectual, Spiritual, Super-Subtle, Aesthetically Pleasing: Dante Gabriel Rossetti's Roman Widow
On 4 October 1873 Dante Gabriel Rossetti wrote to one of his most valued patrons, Frederick Richards Leyland, offering him the opportunity to purchase a version of Proserpine that was almost completed and another painting that he had 'cartooned from...
'John William Waterhouse'
'John William Waterhouse' Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, London, 2 September 2009 Lovers of Victorian art are living in interesting times. Gradually more attention is being paid by exhibition curators to this erstwhile largely...
Kauffman's Interrupted Conversations: The Earl, the Viceroy and the Family Pictures
In 1771, five years after her arrival in England, Angelica Kauffman accepted an invitation to spend six months in Ireland, (1) where various patrons and admirers wanted her to do paintings for their Dublin houses and country estates. The commissions...
'Most Capital in Its Kind': Further Observations on Dr Richard Mead's 'Head of Homer'
A recent article in this journal (The British Art Journal, IX, 2, Autumn 2008) anticipated a piece that I myself had long been intending to write on the British Museum's celebrated Arundel Homer' (Pl 1). But whereas I could not have matched the learning...
Paintbrushes, Palettes, Smocks and Mahl Sticks: Painting in the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society
The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society opened its first exhibition on 4 October 1888 (Pl 1). Pottery and architectural designs, tapestries and metalwork, books and embroidery and furniture and paintings were displayed together in one exhibition and,...
Prince Charles or Prince Henry? Maurice Quentin De la Tour's Portrait of a Stuart Prince
Identifying the later portraits of the exiled Stuarts is not usually a problem. After 1716, when King James III decided that the Jacobite Orders of the Garter and the Thistle should be made compatible, the new portraits of the Stuarts normally showed...
Robert Anning Bell (1863-1933) and the Mosaics in the Houses of Parliament
Elemental facts, the great verities, Time, the Judgment, Life those things were best treated in something which could not remind one of other clever things ... as a painting might. It had just got to be austere and definite--a sort of raw representation...
Ten Glorious Years 1999-2009 ... and Many More to Come: Planning Ahead for the BAJ ... and a Planning Triumph at the Ashmolean
With this somewhat delayed second issue of the tenth volume of The British Art Journal we are proud to draw to the attention of our subscribers and readers all over the world that we are ten years old this year, having been founded in the Summer of...
'The Face of Scotland: Masterpieces of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery'
'The Face of Scotland: Masterpieces of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery' Fleming-Wyfold Gallery, London 15 September-19 December 2009 Advocating a theory of art which included the beauty of the particular, grace in nature, and a contemplative...
The Painted Doctor: Portraits of the Edinburgh Physician Dr James Hamilton Senior (1749-1835) by Sir Henry Raeburn and His Contemporaries
In June 2001, Penny Johnson and Julia Toffolo, Director and Deputy Director of the Government Art Collection, attended a viewing at Sotheby's in London. They were there to assess a portrait by Maw-Anne Flaxman (1768-1833) but were drawn instead to...
The Pissarro Family and Turner
On May 8, 1903, a few months before his death at the age of seventy-three, Camille Pissarro wrote from Paris to his eldest son, Lucien (1863-1944) who lived in England, about Wynford Dewhurst's recent article on 'Impressionist Painting: Its Genesis...
'The Sacred Made Real Spanish Painting and Scultpure 1600-1700'
'The Sacred made Real Spanish Painting and Scultpure 1600-1700' National Gallery London, 21 October 2009-24 January 2010 National Gallery of Art, Washington, 28 February-31 May 2010 [FIGURE 1 OMITTED] It is not often that one can say...
'Turner and the Masters'
'Turner and the Masters' Tate Britain 23 September-31 January 2010 Grand Palais, Paris 22 February-24 May 2010 Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid 22 June-19 September 2010 This essentially didactic exhibition is the brainchild of David Solkin,...
Was William Camden a Collector of Flemish Landscapes?
It was not until 1606 that Henry Peacham (1578-c.1644), writing in his manual for artists, The Art of drawing with the pen, and limming in water colours, introduced the English reader to the concept of landscape painting: Landtskip is a Dutch word,...
William Bell Scott and Thomas Sibson's Saxon Arts: A Source for Iron and Coal
It seems certain that a design entitled Saxon Arts, by Thomas Sibson (1817-44), provided the inspiration for William Bell Scott's Iron and Coal, the last of his large-scale oil series which surrounds the covered courtyard at Wallington Hall, Northumberland...