Journal of Australian Political Economy

Articles from No. 66, Summer

Anatomies of Environmental Knowledge & Resistance: Diverse Climate Justice Movements and Waning Eco-Neoliberalism
'Climate Justice' is the name of the new movement that best fuses a variety of progressive political-economic and political-ecological currents to combat the most serious threat humanity and most other species face in the 21st century. The time is...
Anthropogenic Climate Change and Cultural Crisis: An Anthropological Perspective
Anthropogenic climate change is a potentially catastrophic process of planetary dimensions. The interdisciplinary domain of climate science has been in broad agreement about the dimensions of the problem and the nature of the process for more than...
A Rising Tide: Linking Local and Global Climate Justice
On the 26th of September 2010, fifty activists from the grassroots climate action group, Rising Tide Australia, simultaneously occupied three export coal loading facilities in the Hunter Valley port of Newcastle, and thereby shut down the world's biggest...
Carbon Emissions: Prices and Values
The increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere present an enormous challenge. This article argues that the weaknesses of the market-based preoccupations of most policy respondents do not address the fundamental issues and can have the...
Climate Justice Inside and outside the UNFCCC: The Example of REDD
It is now nearly a year since the failure of the Copenhagen conference to come to agreement on a binding post 2012 international climate deal. This failure has had two effects. Firstly, it has seen the creation of quasi-UN processes that exist alongside...
Climate Strategy: Making the Choice between Ecological Modernisation or Living Well
The idea of Living Well (buen vivir) introduced at the Peoples' Climate Summit in Cochabamba 2010 sets up a rhetorical contrast between high energy polluting economies of the industrial 'North' and low carbon eco-sufficient provisioning models in the...
Introduction
Over the course of 2009, a group of climate change researchers and activists came together, calling ourselves a 'Climate Action Research Group'. Our aim was to reflect on our mounting frustration with the tenor of the climate change debate, the policy...
Making a Market? Contestation and Climate Change
In the last two decades political contestation over climate change generally, and climate policy specifically, has been waged over the merits, design and implementation of market-based regulatory mechanisms. This includes emissions trading, carbon...
Meeting the Challenge of Climate Change: The Poverty of the Dominant Economic Narrative and Market Solutions as Subterfuge
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The dominant narrative that has framed policy debate on the challenge of climate change has been defined in terms of the notion that greenhouse gas emissions must be first and foremost regarded as an economic problem. This...
Responding to Climate Crisis: Modernisation, Limits, Socialism
Debates about how to address the causes of climate change often focus on the need to transition to renewable technologies. In part this reflects the degree to which climate change is presented, in the first instance, as a scientific issue. It is, after...
Strategies for Radical Climate Mitigation
Recent research in climate science, summarised by Allen et al. (2009), finds that to limit global average temperature increases to 2[degrees]C (which is not necessarily safe), humans would have to emit a very limited amount of total CO2 emissions between...
The Cost of a Market Solution: Examining the Garnaut Proposal for Emissions Trading
There is increasing political consensus in Australia that climate change poses real threats to our economy and society, and that some form of policy action is necessary to address these risks. However, as this consensus has grown, so has confusion...
Weaknesses and Reform of Australia's Renewable Electricity Support
As climate change awareness increases so too does the importance attached to renewable electricity generation as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. For instance, Diesendorf's proposal for a course by which Australia could achieve a 30% reduction...
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