International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

Founded in 1975, International Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health, formerly International Family Planning Perspectives, is a peer-reviewed journal published quarterly by Guttmacher Institute. Articles include information about sexual and reproductive health in Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and Asia.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 2, June

Application of Antiseptic to Umbilical Stump Reduces Risk of Neonatal Infection and Mortality
In resource-poor rural areas where women often give birth at home, application of the topical antiseptic chlorhexidine to an infant's umbilical cord stump reduces the likelihood of infection and neonatal death, two recent clinical trials indicate....
Ethnic Inequality in Guatemalan Women's Use of Modern Reproductive Health Care
CONTEXT: Guatemala has some of the poorest reproductive health indices and largest disparities in health in Latin America, particularly between indigenous and Iadina women. To reduce these disparities, it is necessary to under stand how indigenous...
Giving Misoprostol before Vacuum Aspiration Lowers Risk of Complications
Cervical preparation with misoprostol reduces a woman's risk of complications from a first-trimester vacuum aspiration abortion, according to a multicountry, randomized controlled trial. (1) Although women receiving misoprostol reported more abdominal...
Incidence of Induced Abortion by Age and State, Mexico, 2009: New Estimates Using a Modified Methodology
CONTEXT: Because abortion laws in Mexico, which are generally highly restrictive, are determined by individual states, state-level data are essential for policymakers to make informed decisions. In addition, age-specific abortion estimates are needed,...
Increasing Postpartum Contraception in Rural India: Evaluation of a Community-Based Behavior Change Communication Intervention
CONTEXT: The Indian family planning program, though successful in increasing contraceptive use among couples who have achieved their desired family size, has not been equally successful in educating couples about the use of contraceptive methods for...
Male Circumcision Reduces Risk of HIV Acquisition for as Long as Seven Years
Circumcision reduces men's HIV risk for up to seven years, according to follow-up data from a randomized trial conducted in Rakai, Uganda. (1) In analyses that combined data from the two-year trial with nearly five years of posttrial surveillance data,...
Prevalence of Cesarean Delivery Rising Sharply among Poor, Rural Women
The cesarean section rate rose from 3% to 39% in China from 1988 to 2008, and it was especially high among urban, wealthy and highly educated women, according to analyses of data from four cross-sectional surveys. (1) However, the prevalence of cesarean...
Prevalence of Female Genital Cutting Varies Greatly in Western Africa
Despite legislative and other efforts to reduce the prevalence of female genital cutting (often called female circumcision), the practice persists throughout western Africa, although its frequency varies widely among countries, a multinational study...
Remarriage, HIV Infection Linked among Women in Sub-Saharan Africa
in Sub-Saharan Africa, divorced, separated and widowed individuals who have remarried are more likely than those who are single or married for the first time to be HIV-positive, especially if they are female, according to an analysis of nationally...
Treatment-Seeking for Symptoms of Reproductive Tract Infections among Young Women in India
CONTEXT: Small proportions of Indian women report seeking treatment for symptoms suggestive of reproductive tract infections (RTIs). Most studies on treatment-seeking have focused broadly on women of reproductive age, and little is known about the...
Women's Empowerment and Ideal Family Size: An Examination of DHS Empowerment Measures in Sub-Saharan Africa
CONTEXT: The Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) program collects data on women's empowerment, but little is known about how these measures perform in Sub-Saharan African countries. It is important to understand whether women's empowerment is associated...
Young Malawi Women Who Get Payments for Schooling Are Less Likely to Get HIV
In a cluster randomized trial that assessed a cash transfer program in Malawi, young women who received monthly payments were less likely than others to become infected with H1V or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)--but only if they had been attending...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.