The Washington Times (Washington, DC)

The Washington Times is a conservative newspaper published Monday through Friday by the Washington Times LLC. Its editorial headquarters is in Washington, D.C. and it's been published since 1982. The owner of the Washington Times is the Unification Church.The Washington Times covers local, national and world news, with an emphasis on politics. The paper is known for its conservative slant, since it was founded as a response to the more liberal Washington Post. Readership is nationwide.The fact that Reverend Sun Myung Moon of the Unification Churchfounded The Washington Times has made the paper controversial from its very beginning. The question remains as to how much Sun Myung Moon or his aides influence the editorial content of the paper. In 2003, five staff members resigned when their editorials criticizing South Korea for its political repression were stifled. However, not all readers are critical of the way the Washington Times handles news; it is reported that President Ronald Reagan read the paper every day while in office. Sam Dealey is the executive editor, The Washington Times LLC is named as publisher and Chris Dolan is managing editor.

Articles from December 26, 2003

'Absolutely' Often Means See You Later
Byline: Thom Loverro, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Back in December 2001, Minnesota Vikings owner Red McCombs was asked whether his coach, Dennis Green, would be returning the following season. McCombs replied, "Absolutely." Sound familiar? That's...
Affleck's 'Paycheck' Is Worthless; Film Erases More of Actor's Credibility as Leading Man
Byline: Christian Toto, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Ben Affleck began 2003 as the high-flying "Daredevil" only to plummet like the proverbial stone in "Gigli." Now, he's front and center in "Paycheck," director John Woo's latest paean to pyrotechnics....
All about Present for Jersey Wearers
Byline: Bob Cohn, THE WASHINGTON TIMES A certain 12-year-old has decided it's time to send Kurt Warner to the closet. Not only do quarterbacks get benched, so do their jerseys. Like football itself, the sports apparel business can be a cruel...
Anthrax Terror
Byline: Bill Clapper, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Anthrax terror The CIA has been quietly building a case that the anthrax attacks of 2001 were in fact the result of an international terrorist plot. U.S. officials with access to intelligence...
At Least a 'Dozen' Faults
Byline: Scott Galupo, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Director Shawn Levy has had quite a 2003. He kicked off the year with one of its absolute worst, "Just Married," and finishes with "Cheaper by the Dozen," which is only slightly less annoying. Say this...
Auto Show Revs Up at Convention Center
Byline: Bill O'Brien, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Auto Show revs up at Convention Center The 2004 Washington Auto Show opens today and runs through Jan. 4 with vehicles to satisfy any desire. The 62nd annual show, themed "History With a Future,"...
Back Issues at Forefront for Redskins; Effective Runner Likely Will Top Shopping List
Byline: Mark Zuckerman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Washington Redskins entered the 2003 season reasonably confident someone in their corps of intriguing-yet-unproven running backs would seize the opportunity and become the franchise's next feature...
Back to Work
Byline: John McCaslin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Back to work "Christmas is over and business is business." - Franklin Pierce Adams, 1881-1960, "For the Other 364 Days" Upstairs in Iraq Thousands of U.S. military personnel in Iraq and Afghanistan...
Blessings; Residents, Visitors Prayed and Volunteered
Byline: Christina Bellantoni, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Christmas prayers for President Bush and world peace echoed yesterday through the vaulted ceiling of the Washington National Cathedral as the region celebrated the holiday. "There is no one here...
Bookseller and His Pontiac Share a Birth Year
Byline: Vern Parker, THE WASHINGTON TIMES About the time that Bill Brown was busy being born in 1947, a two-tone green 1948 Pontiac Streamliner was rolling out of a Michigan factory. It wasn't until 56 years later that their paths crossed in...
British Lab Test Affirms Mad Cow; U.S. Probes Infection Source
Byline: Jeffrey Sparshott, THE WASHINGTON TIMES An independent lab in England yesterday confirmed that an animal from Washington state had mad cow disease as U.S. investigators searched for the source of the country's first case of the brain-wasting...
Cadillac Enters Fray with New SRX
Byline: Arv Voss, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Wreath and Crest establishment is on a roll of late - and a rapid roll it is at that. One of the most impressive vehicles in the 2004 lineup is the all-new Cadillac SRX - a medium size Luxury...
Chevrolet Returns with an Impala Super Sport
Byline: Arv Voss, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES There are some givens in this life (or at least there ought to be) - You don't tug on Superman's cape, you don't spit into the wind, you don't take the mask off that ol' Lone Ranger, and you don't...
City Holiday Decorations Big Draw with Tourists
Byline: Jim McElhatton, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Pat Penn stood outside the White House yesterday and absorbed the sight for the first time in person, one of hundreds of tourists who visited the first family's home on Christmas despite the nation's...
Cleaning, Dyeing Perk Up Droopy Carpets
Byline: Audrey Ross, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Before putting a home on the market, Realtor Boyd Campbell makes a thorough inspection. He starts by looking down. A dated or stained carpet can turn off buyers. At least 20 percent of the...
Conservatives Work to Deflect Specter; NOW 'Poster Child' Up for Chair
Byline: Charles Hurt, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Sen. Arlen Specter's prospects of becoming chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee if he wins a fourth Senate term in Pennsylvania is making him a target of some conservatives. "You put a person like...
D.C.'S Guard Problem
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES People who have never visited a jail probably know that inmates often fashion their own weapons by sharpening such items as toothbrushes and broomsticks for use in stabbings. Guards are supposed to be on the lookout...
Democratic Hopefuls Tout D.C. Voting Rights; Only 4 Will Participate in Jan. 15 Primary
Byline: Brian DeBose, THE WASHINGTON TIMES All nine Democratic presidential hopefuls support voting rights for the District, but each has his own idea of how to enfranchise the populace in Congress. Although some support the District's right...
Eagles Continue to Thrive on Adversity
Byline: David Elfin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Philadelphia Eagles could do a great commercial for the Postal Service: Nothing stops them either. Not free agent defections. Not injuries that wiped out three Pro Bowl defensive backs for much of...
Fog of War; Questionable Lessons Drawn from Career of Robert McNamara
Byline: Scott Galupo, THE WASHINGTON TIMES "This idea of preventive war has made a comeback," Errol Morris says from his home in Cambridge, Mass. He doesn't mean that in a good way. The documentary filmmaker, who spotlighted the quirky world of...
Hedged in by the Law
Byline: Paul Rosenzweig and Trent England, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Palo Alto means "tall tree" in Spanish, but Kay Leibrand knows tall trees can be a crime in the California city. Mrs. Leibrand, a 61-year-old grandmother, breast cancer survivor...
Hiked Limit on Loans Aids Buyers
Byline: Henry Savage, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Mortgage mega-giants Fannie Mae and the Federal Home Mortgage Corp. (Freddie Mac) are offering a bit of holiday cheer - they have announced that the new conforming loan limit for 2004 will be...
'House' Filled with Tragedy; an Eviction Leaves No Room for Settlement
Byline: Gary Arnold, THE WASHINGTON TIMES "House of Sand and Fog" begins with the question, "Is this your house?" and a middle-of-the-night apprehension that something awful has happened. The remainder of the story, depicted mostly in flashback,...
Iran and Iraq: Sever the Tie
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES The article "Saddam capture seen as aid to ties" (Page 1, Tuesday) clearly reveals Tehran's role in Iraq and its goal to eliminate its most serious opposition force in the region. Our organization has been monitoring...
Koch Backs Bush
Byline: Greg Pierce, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Koch backs Bush Ed Koch, the Democratic former mayor of New York, has endorsed President Bush. "I intend to vote for President George W. Bush in the next election, because in my view, he is best able...
Missing Deadlines and Controlling the Borders
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES An afterthought to the Dec. 19 article "Security checks seen falling short" (Nation): On Sunday, Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge raised the terrorism alert level from yellow to orange, yet the Department of Homeland...
Moving South on the Sawdust Trail
Byline: Wesley Pruden, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Howard Dean headed south yesterday, searching for the sawdust trail that leads into the heart of the Confederacy. The former governor of Vermont, who grew up in New York as an Episcopalian, found a...
Nassau's Colorful Year-End Blowout; Revelers Party at Junkanoo
Byline: Reed Martin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES As he squints through the December cold of his 6 a.m. commute, Wall Street trader David Orloff closes his eyes and remembers Junkanoo. The kaleidoscopic island festival held annually in Nassau...
Office Vacancy Decline Foreseen
Byline: Tim Lemke, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Commercial real-estate professionals said an improving economy will give a boost to office, retail and warehouse markets next year and predicted that enough jobs will be created to fill more than 70 million...
Paris, Berlin Seek Leadership in EU; Move Closer after Failed Summit
Byline: Jabeen Bhatti, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BERLIN - Germany and France once again are talking up a closer bilateral union, this time at the head of a "core Europe" after talks over a European constitution collapsed earlier this month. German...
'Peter Pan' Illusions Are Reel Treat
Byline: Gary Arnold, THE WASHINGTON TIMES "Peter Pan" gets a fitfully diverting jump on the centennial year of James M. Barrie's play (it had its theatrical debut in London on Dec. 27, 1904) with a novel, live-action adaptation in which Peter is...
Prioritizing Bioterror Defenses
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES The largest threat to national security is too small to see - the microbes and viruses of bioterrorism. Biological agents are almost an ideal weapon for terrorists because of the relative ease with which they can be...
Property Investment Is a Full Commitment
Byline: M. Anthony Carr, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Q: We are considering refinancing our home and have decided to use that money to begin buying and selling real estate. I would like to purchase a lower-priced home to fix up and sell. I...
River Also Divides Life and Death; Raging Water Claims Many Crossers
Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES NIAGARA RIVER, N.Y. - The river moves through the deep, rocky gorges south of Niagara Falls at about 20 mph, passing through a region known both as the Whirlpool and Devil's Hole. U.S. Border Patrol agent...
Roberta "RJ" Allis
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Company: Weichert Realtors Address: 731-A Walker Road, Great Falls, VA 22066 Phone: 703/759-6300 Fax: 703/759-5511 E-mail address: rjallis@weichert.com Web site: www.RJsMyRealtor.com Year started: 1977...
Rural Elegance in Montgomery
Byline: Michele Lerner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Winchester Homes is building 46 single-family homes on homesites of 1.5 to 2.5 acres at Hawkins Landing in Laytonsville, where residents can enjoy a country setting in Montgomery County. ...
Sales off, but Market Stays Tight
Byline: Chris Sicks, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Despite a 17 percent drop in sales from the previous month, November was an extremely competitive and tight real estate market. Washington-area home sales totaled only 8,581 last month, but because...
See Mountains near Purcellville
Byline: Michele Lerner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Beazer Homes is building 28 single-family homes on quarter-acre homesites at Brooke Stream Manor in Purcellville, where residents can enjoy a location with mountain views yet be close to historic...
Shooting for the Moon?
Byline: Charles Rousseaux, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Many who come to Washington have stars in their eyes. They have a vision for making the bureaucracy better and the Beltway less corrupt - even though they have no idea how to turn on their vacuum cleaners....
Slog of War; Director Gets Story Stuck in Many Ruts Up 'Cold Mountain'
Byline: Gary Arnold, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The English filmmaker Anthony Minghella may have a weakness for yarns about lovelorn soldiers who soak up prodigious punishment while struggling to reunite with sweethearts. This form of misfortune dominated...
Space, Grace in Historic Alexandria Estate
Byline: Michele Lerner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES The finest homes in Old Town Alexandria represent the traditional Colonial style with elegance and grace, but few are available with surrounding space for gardens, a lawn and even an in-ground...
Sprucing Up; Horticulturist Tends to National Christmas Tree, Other Park Plants
Byline: Tom Ramstack, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Spider mites are on Helen Matthews' mind as she looks at the National Christmas Tree across the street from the rear of the White House. And scale, an insect that infests tree bark. "Both scale and mites...
Surreal 'Fish' Tale That Enchants; Telling Mythological Stories on a Scale Rarely Seen on Screen
Byline: Scott Galupo, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Two years after a big-budget remake of "Planet of the Apes," a commercial hit but a creative disappointment, director Tim Burton has chosen well. The slender magical-realist novel on which "Big Fish" is...
Survivor Studies the Whys of 9/11; Fled Pentagon with Bad Burns
Byline: Rowan Scarborough, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Former Navy Lt. Kevin Shaeffer celebrated a Christmas yesterday in Alexandria that some emergency workers did not think he would see. Mr. Shaeffer was inside the Navy's command center on the morning...
The Art of Totopoly; Learning the Hard Knocks
Byline: Diana West, THE WASHINGTON TIMES If, as John Seabrook writes in the New Yorker, American parents bought Erector sets and Monopoly because they believed they were prepping their kids to become builders or bankers, then the British parents...
The Ban on Christmas Trees
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Grinch might not have stolen Christmas this year, but he almost got away with depriving thousands of Virginians of their Christmas trees. Eight months ago, the Virginia General Assembly enacted a law barring real...
The Endangered Species Act; It Should Be as Dead as the Dodo
Byline: Michael De Alessi, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES On Dec. 28, the Endangered Species Act (ESA) turns 30. But before celebrating the grand anniversary of this landmark federal legislation, we should ask ourselves a sobering question. What...
'Time's' Up
Byline: Christian Toto, THE WASHINGTON TIMES 'Time's' up It's the end of the line for Showtime's "Street Time." The gritty drama, starring Rob Morrow and Scott Cohen, has been canceled after two seasons, Reuters News Agency reports. The show...
Tips on Choosing a Motorcycle That's Right for You
Byline: Arv Voss, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES There are a variety of reasons that people ride motorcycles - probably as many reasons as there are riders. Some of the reasons that motorcycles are appealing include: they provide economic fuel...
'Tis the Season; Reverence and Reflection
Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES There are almost as many reasons to be blue this season as there are reasons to be cheerful. Families are missing loved ones who have gone on to glory on high and those who are stationed in Iraq or elsewhere...
Tradition Upheld amid War; Christians' Holiday Marred by More Strife
Byline: Borzou Daragahi, THE WASHINGTON TIMES BAGHDAD - Though he is commander of U.S. forces in Iraq and faces violent anti-American fighters, Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez still found time for his family this Christmas, making a call home to his four...
Viper Juice Injected into Ram
Byline: Ron Moorhead, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Dodge has taken the power and performance they captured in the Viper sports roadster and transplanted the 500 horsepower and 525 lb-ft of torque from the Viper V-10 engine into a Ram pickup....
Volvo's Flagship Is Nearly Flawless
Byline: Sue Mead, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES The original S80, introduced to the U.S. in 1998, was Volvo's first large car with front-wheel drive. When it was introduced then, critics and fans both agreed the company had taken a big step forward...
What Parity?
Byline: David Elfin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The nosedives of last year's Super Bowl teams, Tampa Bay and Oakland, have made this seem like yet another incredibly unpredictable year in the NFL. Not so. While only two of the AFC's six playoff teams...