The Washington Times (Washington, DC)

The Washington Times is a conservative newspaper published Monday through Friday by the Washington Times LLC. Its editorial headquarters is in Washington, D.C. and it's been published since 1982. The owner of the Washington Times is the Unification Church.The Washington Times covers local, national and world news, with an emphasis on politics. The paper is known for its conservative slant, since it was founded as a response to the more liberal Washington Post. Readership is nationwide.The fact that Reverend Sun Myung Moon of the Unification Churchfounded The Washington Times has made the paper controversial from its very beginning. The question remains as to how much Sun Myung Moon or his aides influence the editorial content of the paper. In 2003, five staff members resigned when their editorials criticizing South Korea for its political repression were stifled. However, not all readers are critical of the way the Washington Times handles news; it is reported that President Ronald Reagan read the paper every day while in office. Sam Dealey is the executive editor, The Washington Times LLC is named as publisher and Chris Dolan is managing editor.

Articles from October 3, 2004

A Bluff, or a Blunder?
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Tod Lindberg asks why Saddam Hussein didn't fully cooperate with the U.N. inspectors, because if he had, he probably would still be in power rather than in a cell waiting for his probable execution ("Saddam miscalculated?"...
Adults Play at Benning Center; 6 Months of Planning Culminate in Cleanup
Byline: Denise Barnes, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The threat of rain did not dampen the spirits yesterday of hundreds of volunteers determined to spruce up the grounds of the Benning Park Recreation Center in Southeast so neighborhood children would have...
Agents Applaud Merger of Border Air, Marine Force
Byline: Jerry Seper, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The pending transfer of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's air and marine operations division to U.S. Customs and Border Protection is being hailed by rank-and-file agents in both agencies as a positive...
Angelos Payoff May Be Dangerous
Byline: Eric Fisher, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos earned both his fortune and local fame as a legal battler, a fearless litigator willing to scrap against many of the country's largest and richest corporations. That...
A Touch of Controversy; New Balloting Systems Seek Vote of Confidence
Byline: Joyce Howard Price, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The turmoil that surrounded the 2000 presidential-vote recount in Florida prompted a national call for an overhaul of the nation's voting systems. Early on, many eyed electronic voting - specifically,...
Back to Congress' 'War Vote'
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES President Bush's campaign keeps asking pointed questions about Sen. John Kerry's "vote for war" against Iraq two years ago. The claim Congress' Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of Oct....
Baseball Team by Any Other Name
Byline: Dan Daly, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The Sunday Column would like to welcome the Expos, the Pride of Puerto Rico, to Washington. * * * Today Major League Baseball, tomorrow World Team Tennis. * * * Or maybe even professional hockey,...
Bush Derides Kerry Stance on Defense; the President Says No to Any "Global Test" for Acting Unilaterally"to Defend Ourselves."
Byline: Joseph Curl, THE WASHINGTON TIMES President Bush yesterday labeled his Democratic opponent's call to seek permission from foreign governments before protecting America the "Kerry Doctrine," juxtaposing the maxim with his own "Bush Doctrine,"...
Campbell, Tigers Pound Vols
Byline: Barker Davis, THE WASHINGTON TIMES KNOXVILLE, Tenn. - Color Knoxville burnt orange. No. 8 Auburn administered a merciless thrashing of 10th-ranked Tennessee at Neyland Stadium last night, turning the matchup of undefeated SEC teams into...
Curve to Realistic Grading?
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Recently, reports surfaced that Princeton University has tried to solve an academic problem affecting many other social problems: grade inflation. We see the consequences of this regularly when many public school students...
Good Start in School; Age Isn't Only Way to Decide
Byline: Gabriella Boston, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Mairead Hunter Herbers, 17, has always been the youngest in her class. When many girls in her class reached puberty, she had not, and when her classmates got their learner's permits, she couldn't. ...
Great Miscreants Remembered
Byline: Bart McDowell, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES What fun it is to run with the foxes and hunt with the hounds. In these pages, we hobnob with villains - some of them quite charming - and vicariously help cops bring them down. Lawrence...
How Foolish Khrushchev Nearly Started World War III
Byline: Arnold Beichman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES There were five chronological successors to Joseph Stalin after his mysterious death in 1953 - Nikita Khrushchev, Leonid Brezhnev, Yuri Andropov, Konstantin Chernenko and Mikhail Gorbachev. Of these,...
Hunting Elk at 8,500 Feet - with a Bow
Byline: Gene Mueller, THE WASHINGTON TIMES For Bob Troup and his hunting friends, the first day at the 8,500-foot elevation Douglass Pass in the Colorado Rockies dawned clear and cool. "The temperature was in the low 50s," said Troup, a general...
Keep Eye on Your Blood Pressure When You Exercise
Byline: Dr. Gabe Mirkin, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES A study from Johns Hopkins University shows that people who develop very high blood pressure during exercise are the ones most likely to do so in later years. These people have arteries that...
Kerry Shifts Focus onto the Economy; He Accuses Bushof Losing Touch Withmiddle-Class Votersand Their Problems
Byline: Stephen Dinan, THE WASHINGTON TIMES ORLANDO, Fla. - Demo-cratic presidential nominee Sen. John Kerry, arguing that President Bush has lost touch with middle-class voters, promised them yesterday that "I've got your back." With one new...
Living Less Dangerously in Pakistan, India
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Relations between nuclear-armed rivals India and Pakistan took an atmospheric turn for the better last Friday, relieving widespread concerns that the building rapprochement between the two countries would deteriorate...
Middle-Class Mania . . . amid Delusions?
Byline: Paul Craig Roberts, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The United States might be a superpower, but it does not control its own fate. Delusion does. Much of the U.S. public is deluded about the invasion and occupation of Iraq and its consequences,...
Olympic Success Emboldens Athens to Eye Investors; Official Touts 'Thriving' Trade Base
Byline: Gus Constantine, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Greece is reaching out to reap the harvest of its Olympic success, with a campaign to attract traders and investors eager to reach countries located in its neighborhood. Greek officials believe that...
Panthers' Defense Gets Set for Vick
Byline: David Elfin, THE WASHINGTON TIMES First-year coach Jim Mora hasn't wasted any time in reviving the Falcons. Atlanta, 5-11 last year, is 3-0 going into today's visit to defending NFC champion Carolina. Of course, Mora has been fortunate that...
Pocahontas' Brief Life, Artist Audubon
Byline: John M. and Priscilla S. Taylor, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES It's not easy to write a good biography of an American Indian woman who died at about age 20 and can be glimpsed only through the writings of the long-dead white males around...
Political Perils of Soros
Byline: Jeffrey T. Kuhner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Billionaire financier George Soros is putting his credibility and vast wealth on the line to defeat President George W. Bush. He has announced he will embark on a nationwide speaking tour...
Reclaiming Art as It Is
Byline: Carol Herman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES At its core, Roger Kimball's "The Rape of the Masters" is an anger-making book. In it, Mr. Kimball, manag ing editor of the New Criterion and a noted art critic, shows that the academic study of art...
Redskins Must Get It Together; Gibbs: Offense, Defense Need to Complement Each Other
Byline: Jody Foldesy, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Three games into coach Joe Gibbs' second tenure with the Washington Redskins, a clear pattern has emerged: The defense is playing well enough to win. The offense is playing poorly enough to fret....
Redskins vs. Browns
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES OFFENSE REDSKINS: The jury's still out on QB Mark Brunell, who rallied for impressive stats Monday night after appearing to struggle most of the evening. There also are questions about RB Clinton Portis and his ability...
Right on Track; All aboard for Railroad Museum
Byline: Karen Goldberg Goff, THE WASHINGTON TIMES As long as there have been railroads, there have been children who love trains. That's why the Fairfax Station Railroad Museum was teeming with preschoolers on a recent Sunday. The museum is a great...
Russian Gypsies Wronged on Rights; Helsinki Commission Finds Pattern of Abuses
Byline: Marion Baillot, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The U.S. Helsinki Commission said last week that it had discerned a pattern of human rights abuse of Gypsies, also called Roma, in Russia. The commission, an independent federal agency, encourages...
Space Travel Patrons Set High Expectations; Will Put Dream to Test Tomorrow
Byline: Philip Chien, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES A British businessman and a legendary aircraft designer say they believe thousands of people will pay almost $200,000 to become space tourists, and after tomorrow, they could be one step closer...
Strengthening the Strait
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Nicholas Kralev makes one major error in his otherwise perceptive story on Taiwanese arms sales ("China hits U.S. sales to Taiwan," Page 1, Friday). In agreeing to the so-called "third communique" with China on Aug....
Teachers' Choices
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES Few interest groups oppose making school choice available to low-income families more vigorously than the public-school teachers unions. Captive markets appeal even to labor unions. Indeed, as the 2.7 million-member...
The Clear Leader Emerges
Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES As the presidential election draws near, an important consideration for voters should be who would best manage the transition of the liberated country of Iraq into a democracy, the incumbent, President George Bush, or...
The Psyche on Paper; Understanding the Risks, Appeal of Personality Testing
Byline: Eric Wargo, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES They have been created from the highest and most humane motives: to aid in diagnosing the mentally ill, to plumb the depths of the psyche, to help people better understand themselves and find harmony...
Viewers Can Profit from Fed Site
Byline: Joseph Szadkowski, THE WASHINGTON TIMES The U.S. central bank, or Federal Reserve, has been overseeing monetary issues for the world's most robust spending juggernaut since 1913. However, many children and even adults probably have little...
Visiting Twin Oaks
Byline: David Jones, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Visiting Twin Oaks One of the perks of this job is occasionally being invited to a really excellent luncheon. So it was on Tuesday when about half a dozen of us, led by Editor in Chief Wesley Pruden...
When Nerdish Boys Dreamed Up New Comic-Book Heroes
Byline: Stephen Goode, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Superman made his comic book debut in the now legendary (and very valuable) first issue of Action Comics, in June 1938. He was at the center of the cover, hoisting a car high over his head,...
Why Some Horrors Must Be Stopped by 'Just War'
Byline: James V. Schall, S.J., SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES Despite this book's provocative title, "war" does not qualify as a "virtue." War is an action, a pas sion, a relation. The virtue associated with war is courage. But the Rev. Alexander...
Why Was Hosack's Death a Secret?
Byline: Steve Nearman, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Remember Everett Hosack, the centenarian who attempted a world-record shot put last year? Host Jay Leno invited Hosack to be a guest on "The Tonight Show" after the longtime Cleveland resident recorded...
World Bank-IMF Foes Snarl Traffic; War Protesters Arrested
Byline: Guy Taylor, THE WASHINGTON TIMES Heavy security in anticipation of protests at the International Monetary Fund and World Bank buildings snarled downtown traffic yesterday in the District, while anti-war demonstrators carrying coffins from...