The Washington Times (Washington, DC)

The Washington Times is a conservative newspaper published Monday through Friday by the Washington Times LLC. Its editorial headquarters is in Washington, D.C. and it's been published since 1982. The owner of the Washington Times is the Unification Church.The Washington Times covers local, national and world news, with an emphasis on politics. The paper is known for its conservative slant, since it was founded as a response to the more liberal Washington Post. Readership is nationwide.The fact that Reverend Sun Myung Moon of the Unification Churchfounded The Washington Times has made the paper controversial from its very beginning. The question remains as to how much Sun Myung Moon or his aides influence the editorial content of the paper. In 2003, five staff members resigned when their editorials criticizing South Korea for its political repression were stifled. However, not all readers are critical of the way the Washington Times handles news; it is reported that President Ronald Reagan read the paper every day while in office. Sam Dealey is the executive editor, The Washington Times LLC is named as publisher and Chris Dolan is managing editor.

Articles from October 6, 1999

16 KenCen Drama Winners: Two Local Recipients Get $10,000 Each for New Play
Caleen Sinnette Jennings, an associate professor of theater at American University, and the Source Theatre Company in Washington were awarded $10,000 each yesterday from the Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays. They were the only local recipients...
Angelos Waiting until Final Hour to Make Decision on Miller
Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos made his fortune as a lawyer, winning billion dollar class action suits in which he had to spend many harrowing days waiting for juries to return their verdicts. Apparently Angelos has decided it's high time...
Apocalypse Soon: Nightmare to Come May Catch U. S. Unawares
Presidential campaigns are useful for determining: whether a vice president looks more presidential in a brown gabardine or a blue worsted suit while announcing a change of address for his campaign headquarters; whether a Christian gentleman should...
Archer Predicts Budget Faceoff: Says Clinton May Threaten Shutdown
Rep. Bill Archer, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, yesterday said President Clinton wants to use the threat of a government shutdown to squeeze more spending out of Congress in an end-of-the-year budget showdown. "I think this has...
Art Controversy Follows Hillary on Canada Trip: Sculpture at U.S. Embassy Likened to Brooklyn Display
TORONTO - The ruckus over the Brooklyn Museum of Art exhibit is not the only art controversy dogging first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. A towering bronze sculpture outside a new U.S. Embassy in Canada's capital, which she dedicated last week,...
Backers See Scant Hope for Test Ban: Senate Might Not Vote on Treaty
President Clinton's push for the Senate to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty all but died yesterday as Republicans held their ground in opposition and a senior Democrat conceded there were not enough votes to approve the pact. Sen. Joseph...
Banker, 2 Russians Charged in Fraud: Laundering Scandal May Be U.S. Record
Federal investigators yesterday charged a former Bank of New York executive and two Russian-born businessmen with masterminding what may rank as the largest money-laundering operation ever in the United States. The three-count indictment, which...
Barkley Isn't the Selfish One
Scottie Pippen says he is where he wanted to be all along, in Portland, Ore., with the Trail Blazers. That is his fairy tale, and he is sticking to it until reality intrudes on his new surroundings. Pippen lives in a fantasy world, starting...
Brickbats Fly over Tipping Suggestions in Guide-Hiring Story
It's bad enough when an e-mail arrives accusing me of being a cheapskate and a know-nothing. But when another reader suggests that the fellow who covers the outdoors for The Washington Times is beginning to act as if he worked for the other paper...
Bush Fires Another Salvo at GOP: Raps Conservatives, Also Mocks Gore
NEW YORK - Texas Gov. George W. Bush yesterday stepped up his criticism of conservative Republicans, while mocking Vice President Al Gore in a speech that accelerated his march toward the moderate middle. Less than a week after blindsiding congressional...
Campaign-Donor Limits Hang in Balance in Missouri Case
Supreme Court justices grappled yesterday over whether legal limits on campaign contributions require proof of corruption or simply a general belief that big contributors appear to corrupt the system. "If contributions are speech, it's hard to...
Census Bureau Enlists Teachers to Get Accurate Tally: Targets Undercounting of Children
The Census Bureau has moved to remedy a fault that has haunted it for a nearly a decade - the massive undercounting of children in the 1990 census. Bureau officials yesterday announced they are starting the second and major phase of a "Census in...
Circus Visits Soup Kitchen
Clowning around is a full-time job for the performers and crew of the Big Apple Circus, but yesterday they took time out to bring fun to Martha's Table, a children's center and soup kitchen in Columbia Heights. "I get laughter, applause and admiration...
Clinton's OK Needed for Bill to Widen I-66
A bill that would allow Virginia to widen Interstate 66 inside the Capital Beltway is in President Clinton's hands. Both the House and the Senate passed final versions of the fiscal 2000 Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations...
College Tuition Increase Least in 4 Years: Student Loan Default Rate at 10-Year Low
Tuition rates at U.S. colleges and universities rose by less than 5 percent this year, the smallest increase in the past four years, a national study has found. A record $64 billion in student financial aid was available last year, more than half...
Death by Rumor
Throughout the impeachment of William Jefferson Clinton the president's apologists maintained that nearly every president cheated on his wife. Given this erroneous world view it was only a matter of time before even people like Gary Bauer would face...
Diaz Arce's Absence Means Safer RFK
No Raul Diaz Arce, no 911 calls. RFK Stadium will be a safe place tonight to watch Major League Soccer's Tampa Bay Mutiny play D.C. United. Diaz Arce, who is with El Salvador's national team and won't accompany the Mutiny to the nation's capital,...
Downtown Red Cross Base Vote Delayed
The D.C. Council has delayed the vote on a tax-exempt bond for the proposed American Red Cross national headquarters downtown in hopes of avoiding a conflict with Congress over its authority to issue such bonds. The Council yesterday tabled the...
Embassy Row
POPULAR STATESMAN Iceland's Ambassador Jon Baldvin Hannibalsson, a man of wit and intelligence, has become a popular diplomat on Embassy Row. But the longer he stays in Washington, the more popular he is becoming in Iceland, too. "The less...
Ex-Capital Miller Now Faces Life off the Ice
For the first time since he graduated from Michigan State in 1985, Kelly Miller is not playing in the NHL this fall. To put it another way, for the first time in his adult life the right wing is unemployed, and he's pretty well convinced that's not...
Flood Relief for Unions
Bailing out after Hurricane Floyd was bad enough. What the Federal Emergency Management Agency called one of the biggest disasters in history destroyed or damaged more than 30,000 homes and closed some 1,000 roads, 40 bridges and 16 school systems...
Floyd a Big Problem, Jan. 1 Not, BGE Says
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. officials yesterday said the utility's inability to quickly restore power to a half-million customers after Hurricane Floyd doesn't foreshadow trouble Jan. 1. "Y2K is not about system damage," Brian C. Daschbach,...
GOP Leaders Yield on HMO Lawsuits: Now Support Limited-Liability Bill
House Republican leaders yesterday abandoned their longtime opposition and threw their support behind a bill that will allow patients to sue their health insurance companies. "There are very appropriate ways to get into the liability issue that...
Hill Leaders Back Visitors Center: Security a Primary Concern after Two Guards Slain in '98
Congressional leaders signed off on a plan to add a massive new visitors center to the Capitol. "It would be the single largest addition to the Capitol complex since the current House and Senate chambers were added," said Senate Minority Leader...
Hospital Receives Reprieve on Debt
A bankruptcy court judge yesterday gave Greater Southeast Community Hospital until Oct. 13 to plan its escape from bankruptcy after creditors agreed to give it more time to consider new offers of financial help. The hospital, which is some $70...
House GOP Forces $2 Billion Cut in Foreign Assistance: Funding Scaled Back to Save Surplus
The House approved 214-211 yesterday a slimmed-down, $12.7 billion foreign aid bill after Republican leaders spent days corralling votes. Republicans said the decision to cut $2 billion from last year's spending levels was necessary to meet their...
Inside Politics
ANOTHER EXTREMIST Arnold Lehman, director of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, finds himself at the center of a furor over a dung-and-porno version of the Virgin Mary on display at his institution. But this is not the first time that Mr. Lehman has...
Inside the Beltway
LIVING HISTORY David McCullough may have gotten himself in Dutch with fellow historian Edmund Morris, author of the controversial new biography of Ronald Reagan, at the big Mount Vernon fund-raising gala Sunday night. "I'm writing a book on...
Interior Official Asks for Whistleblower Probe
A top Interior Department official has asked the inspector general to investigate charges an employee was ordered to destroy documents and refuse to cooperate with federal investigators probing fraud and abuse at the agency. Jamie Clark, director...
It's No Party Living near a College Campus: Students' Trash, Parties Trigger Neighbors' Ire
Sleepless area residents who live near college campuses have come to expect rowdy students partying on weekends. But the neighbors say the "partying" has gone too far: Drunken students are parading half-naked through neighborhoods, stealing lawn...
Judge for Tripp Trial Called Well-Qualified
The Howard County judge in the Linda R. Tripp wiretap trial was appointed to the bench in 1995 by Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening just eight days after she had helped organize a fund-raiser for his campaign. Howard County Administrative Judge...
Justice Poised to Deport Saudi Bombing Suspect
The Justice Department moved a step closer yesterday to deporting a Saudi national suspected in the June 1996 bombing of the Khobar Towers apartment complex in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia, that killed 19 U.S. servicemen and injured 500 others. Hani Abdel...
Kickoff a Success, by George
THE EVENT: A George Washington Weekend benefit at Mount Vernon. THE CAUSE: Raising an estimated $600,000 to kick off a $60 million campaign for the construction and endowment of a three-building education center on the grounds of George Washington's...
Maryland Is Working to Curb HIV Numbers
Carl Savitch's Sept. 19 commentary, "AIDS policy astray in Maryland," demonstrates a simplistic understanding of HIV prevention, a misunderstanding of partner-notification services and a lack of understanding of Maryland's HIV reporting system. ...
Mids Mix It Up and Produce Winning Formula
ANNAPOLIS - Perhaps the key moment in Navy's 31-28 upset over West Virginia on Saturday came before the game started. If you ask Midshipmen coach Charlie Weatherbie, it happened before the season started. Navy threw the ball on its first play...
Montgomery County Health Officials Curb `Candy Police'
Folks won't have to worry about the "candy police" if they dare to hand out goodies in Montgomery County without a permit. The health inspector who raised County Council member Nancy Dacek's ire recently by ordering bank employees to stop giving wrapped...
Nextel's Stock Climb Fans For-Sale Rumors
Now that MCI WorldCom Inc. is buying Sprint Corp., analysts are speculating whether Reston's Nextel Communications might be the next major wireless telephone company to go on the block. Nextel's stock has gone up almost $10 in the last three days....
N. Korea Ties Seen Directed at U.S. Experts Cite Trade, Embassy Bombing
China opened a round of high-profile diplomacy with its communist neighbor, North Korea, yesterday after five years of low-key relations dating from the death of President Kim Il-sung. Chinese Foreign Minister Tang Jiaxuan arrived in Pyongyang...
Pain in the Grass: Nobel Committee Honors Aging German Radical
The Nobel Prize literary committee has done it again. With unswerving certitude, the committee has awarded its annual $1 million prize to an author of impeccable left-wing and anti-Western credentials. German author Gunter Grass is, like the previous...
Panel Holds Hearing on Bill to Aid Fathers: Measure Would Help Dads Find Jobs
Fathers who leave their children hurt their children, a House panel agreed yesterday, although they could not agree on what to do about the problem. "Most poor fathers have problems very similar to those of the mothers who become dependent on welfare,"...
Pollsters Get in Touch with Feelings of Public
Approval ratings are the basic sustenance of pollsters and those who follow the election horse race. They are the timely, efficient indicators of public whim, and credible fodder for journalists intent on making a point. But pollsters and the...
Poor Defense Has Nolan Searching for Answers
Ten new starters, two first-round picks and $56 million tackles over the past three years and the Washington Redskins defense is still no better than when former coordinator Ron Lynn was dismissed after the 1996 season. The Redskins are on pace...
Pope Pius XII Was No Friend of the Jews
Both Carolyn Naughton and Kenneth J. Larsen defend the indefensible when they portray Pope Pius XII as a friend and rescuer of European Jewry ("An unfair treatment of Pope Pius XII," Letters, Sept. 29). The evidence is to the contrary. After...
Pro-Life Blacks Liken Cause to Civil Rights, Set Multicity March: Three-Day Trek to End at Supreme Court
In the tradition of civil rights marches of the 1960s, a coalition of black pro-life groups is planning a multicity "Say So March" this weekend, starting in Newark, N.J., and concluding Monday on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court. Marchers hope...
Rate-Setting Panel Keeps Hands off, Urges Alertness: Sees Potential Large Cost Increases
The Federal Reserve yesterday declined to raise interest rates for a third time this year, but signaled that it will move again if economic growth keeps accelerating and threatening to ignite inflation. In a statement after a daylong meeting that...
Running on Empty
Until NATO went to war against Yugoslavia, debating the relative strengths and contributions of its members' militaries was mostly confined to theoretical discussions at seminars and diplomatic gatherings. Well, the theoretical debates ended March...
Security Cameras OK'd for Schools
The Montgomery County Council yesterday approved spending $685,000 to install security cameras in all of the county's 24 public high schools by the start of the next school year. Three county high schools - Damascus, Einstein and Seneca Valley...
Senate OKs More Flights at Reagan: Warner, Robb Oppose Measure
The Senate yesterday approved a $43 billion Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill that would allow 24 more flights in and out of Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport daily. Half of those would be for flights longer than the...
Senate Rejects Clinton Bench Nominee: Black Missouri Judge Had Opposed Death Penalty; Democrats Charge Racism
The Senate yesterday unexpectedly rejected one of President Clinton's judicial nominees, saying he was unfit for the federal bench in Missouri partly because he opposes the death penalty. "This is a good decision . . . law enforcement officers...
Slaying Details Cause Girl's Relatives to Flee: Ex-Convict Says Clark Killed Michele, 6
Michele Lee Dorr's father and aunt fled from a Rockville courtroom yesterday as an ex-convict testified to the gruesome way Hadden Irving Clark, 47, said he killed the 6-year-old on May 31, 1986. "He told me it was a 12-inch butcher knife," testified...
Some Wizards Cry Foul in Regard to New Rules Implemented by NBA
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - When the NBA decided to modify some of its rules to improve scoring, speed up the game and make it less physical, most in the league's New York offices thought they had done something good. After all, teams averaged just...
Stall Tactics Charged over Holocaust Legal Claims
Attorneys representing Nazi-era slave laborers yesterday accused German firms of stalling on holocaust-related legal claims, delaying a settlement in hopes more of the elderly claimants will die before they can collect. The charge, lodged against...
Taking Dim View of `Bright Idea' Need Not Quash Creative Thinking
Jim "the Idea Man" Jackson, hoping to impress with his latest suggestion, wandered over to his boss's desk and began speaking. "Excuse me, Mr. Crandall, I was thinking we might better serve our customers if we took a couple of the people we have...
Terps at Crossroads against Wake Forest
Maryland football coach Ron Vanderlinden was at it again yesterday, trying his best to limit the hype building around his team and this week's game at Wake Forest. Is the ACC wide open after No. 1-ranked Florida State and seventh-ranked Georgia...
Today's Chianti Sheds Straw-Covered Image
Chianti may be Italy's best-known wine, but its traditional image hardly matches its modern reality. You don't see many cute, straw-covered fiasci anymore, but the wines have taken a definite upswing in quality. Most Chiantis used to taste thin...
Tour of Sainted Nun's Remains Begins in la Plata
The remains of a simple French nun who popes called the "greatest saint of modern times" arrived at a Maryland monastery last night, opening a 120-stop relic tour rare on the American Catholic scene. St. Therese of Lisieux was canonized just 28...
Under Fire on the Intrepid: Crew Remembers Kamikaze Attacks
Lolling in the Hudson River at Manhattan's Pier 86, on West 46th Street and 12th Avenue, sits the USS Intrepid. The World War II aircraft carrier is a showcase and museum. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has used it as a podium for foreign...
Virginia Considers Regulating Bounty Hunters, Bondsmen
Billy Jack Pace has been a bounty hunter for nine years, and he's only had to break down one door. Sarah Strawser was the most scared she's ever been when five armed men broke through her front door and claimed to be bounty hunters looking for...
Winning Will Stop Questions
ATLANTA - Atlanta Braves general manager John Schuerholz was steaming before yesterday's National League Division Series opener between the Braves and the Houston Astros at Turner Field. He had to answer THE QUESTION. Is it disappointing to have...