UNESCO Courier

Articles from October

A Decisive Victory
In July, 120 countries voted to establish the International Criminal Court (ICC), which will judge crimes against humanity, genocide and war crimes. William R. Pace led the coalition of non-governmental organizations that campaigned for its creation...
A Long March
As the world changes, so does the defense of human rights. International civil society is mobilizing in reaction to new threats to the gains already made The world is going through a period of far-reaching upheaval. Armed conflicts, flagrant and...
A Universal Responsibility
Each of us is responsible for replacing the logic of force with the logic of reason and respect for the views of others On the threshold of a new millennium, the issue of responsibility is taking on a new dimension. Humankind is still beset by war...
Culturally Correct
In Central Asia, cultural heritage policies have a single objective: to shore up fragile national identities As the former Soviet republics of Central Asia get down to post-independence nation-building, a major cultural issue has crystallized around...
Drugs: Surveillance or Punishment?
Should drugs be tolerated, legalized or prohibited? The debate takes on new proportions with the growing use of illicit substances The war on drugs is a failure. Declared by the United States in 1983 and taken up by the international community in...
For an End to Double Standards
Emma Bonino, who was named a European Commissioner in 1995, is active on many fronts. A human rights militant since the beginning of her political career, she advocates a new system of international relations that is a far cry from the prevailing cynicism...
Globalization: What Is at Stake
Fifty years after the 1948 Universal Declaration, is there a new generation of human rights? If so, how does it relate to the rights enshrined half a century ago? The international situation in the late 1990s demonstrates more than ever the indivisibility...
Kabul: Women in the Shadows
Since September 1996, the new masters of Kabul have imposed apartheid on 80 per cent of Afghanistan. This time, segregation is not based on skin colour but on gender Kabul, March 1998. It has been raining for two days in the rubble-strewn capital...
Keeping Up with Science
"Science, itself, cannot supply us with an ethic. It can show us how to achieve a given end, and it may show us that some ends cannot be achieved. But among ends that can be achieved our choice must be decided by other than purely scientific considerations."...
Manuel Vazquez Montalban: "Writing Is an Act of Free Choice."
With a dose of humour, the successful Catalan author discusses such serious topics as society, politics, his craft - and why he writes detective novels * Did you know there are over 200 entries for Manuel Vazquez Montalban on the search engines...
Mission Accomplished
In 1992, six, non-governmental organizations launched a campaign to scrap antipersonnel landmines. Five years later, 121 countries have signed the Ottawa treaty to ban them Even die-hard optimists would not have believed it possible when a handful...
Pollution on the Cheap
The Kyoto Protocol was endorsed at the eleventh hour on 10 December 1998 by representatives of some 150 governments after adding a final point. Since they failed to reach a consensus on several key issues, they would negotiate them later, in particular...
Poor Relations
As the gap between rich and poor widens, the have-nots are demanding more respect for economic and social rights, which are often given short shrift "The international community must treat human rights globally in a fair and equal manner, on the...
South Korea: Working Women Demand Their Due
Working women in South Korea have never enjoyed the same rights as their male counterparts. In the 1960s, when men were struggling for improved working conditions and higher wages, women were busy defending their basic human rights. South Korea's...
Televised Genocide
Fifty years after the Second World War, the international community is watching crimes against humanity in Rwanda and Yugoslavia Between the Leninakan earthquake in December 1988 and the Gulf War in 1991, the world seemed to have undergone a fundamental...
The Greenhouse Gas Trade
Judging by the number of unresolved disagreements, the next round of negotiations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions looks like it will be poisonous. Despite the initial consensus formalized by the Kyoto Protocol signed in Japan last December, major...
The Struggle Goes Global
With economic and social rights now on the agenda, many new players have emerged alongside older human rights organizations. In South Korea, women are speaking out about their working conditions, and in Great Britain the homeless and badly-housed are...
Today's Headlines, Tomorrow's World
The media's simplistic vision of the next century alternates between gloom and euphoria We have been spinning fantasies about the third millennium for a long time. But the closer we get to the year 2000, the more harmless it seems, the more artificial...
To Live with Dignity in the United Kingdom
While most people in the United Kingdom enjoy an adequate if not high standard of living, many do not have a decent place to live - or anywhere at all. Though suffering from mental illness, Gordon (not his real name) is responsible for looking after...
When the Kitchen Does the Cooking
Microchips may soon be in your shoes, monitoring your body temperature. But how long before they take you for a walk? 'Look, you're a doughnut." Professor Michael Hawley is stating his case for embedded technology. "You're a roundish little thing...
WWW.$$$@Online.Education
The construction boom in "virtual classrooms" is leading universities to find new partners and competitors in the corporate world The sleek towers and domed halls of Singapore's Temasek Polytechnic offer the services students dream of - state-of-the-art...
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