Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 3, April

After Iran: Back to Basics on "Peaceful" Nuclear Energy
If states-parties to the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) want to prevent countries such as Iran from using the treaty as a legal cover to acquire all they need to come within days of having nuclear weapons, they will have to return to what the...
Arming Dictators, Rewarding Proliferators
Last year, Pakistani leader Gen. Pervez Musharraf pardoned his former nuclear weapons program chief Abdul Qadeer Khan for masterminding a global black market trade that delivered advanced nuclear weapons technology to Libya, Iran, and North Korea. For...
Bolton Nomination Splits Capitol Hill
President George W. Bush's nomination of John R. Bolton as U.S. permanent representative to the United Nations has divided members of Congress along party lines. But it is unclear if Democrats will have any more luck in derailing Bolton's nomination...
Canada Spurns Bush on Missile Defense
Defying intense U.S. lobbying and President George W. Bush's personal intervention, Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin recently announced that Ottawa would not join U.S. efforts to build long-range ballistic missile defenses. Martin's decision stemmed...
Congress's Iraq Probes Winding Down
A U.S. Senate investigation of intelligence issues related to pre-war estimates of Iraq's prohibited weapons programs appears to be winding down. A similar House investigation appears to have been concluded about a year ago.Last summer, the Senate Select...
CTBTO Releases Test Ban Monitoring Data for Tsunami Warning
Last December's deadly tsunami in the Indian Ocean might inspire an additional mission for the international organization that is tasked with eventually verifying the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT).On March 4, the Preparatory Commission (PrepCom)...
Editor's NOTE
Sadly, next month's nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference may turn out to be a dialogue of the deaf. All states-parties agree on the need to strengthen the treaty, but their priorities and proposed changes differ significantly.Striving...
IAEA Criticizes Iran Cooperation
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Deputy Director-General Pierre Goldschmidt told the agency's Board of Governors March 1 that Iran has failed to cooperate fully with the IAEA investigation of Tehran's nuclear programs. Specifically, he said,...
IN MEMORIAM: Hans Bethe (1906-2005)
Hans Bethe, who died on March 6 at the age of 98, was exemplary as a scientist; a citizen-advocate seeking to stem the arms race; and an individual of warmth, generosity, tenacity, and modest habits.Bethe made major contributions to several areas of...
Iran, Russia Reach Nuclear Agreement
The conclusion of an agreement in which Russia will supply Iran with nuclear fuel for a 1,000-megawatt light-water nuclear power reactor marks the latest step in a decade-long controversy.Russian Federal Agency for Atomic Energy Director Alexander Rumyantsev...
LOOKING BACK: The 1995 Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Review and Extension Conference
This May, the parties to the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) will gather for the treaty's 2005 Review Conference, where they will assess the treaty's effectiveness and explore ways to remedy its shortcomings. Such conferences are not empty rituals;...
Negative Security Assurances: Revisiting the Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone Option
A perennial subject of contention at review conferences of the nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), held every five years, has been the desire of the non-nuclear-weapon states-parties to the treaty to obtain "legally binding negative security assurances"...
New Reports Cite Looting at Iraqi Sites; UNMOVIC Future Discussed
Equipment and materials related to Iraq's former prohibited weapons programs are missing from the country, according to new reports. The revelations come as UN Security Council members have been conducting informal discussions regarding the future of...
News ANALYSIS: The Bush Administration and Verification
Since taking office, the Bush administration has opposed or bypassed opportunities to codify measures to check compliance with three arms control treaties. Yet, the U.S. government's lead office for assessing worldwide adherence to arms control obligations-the...
North Korea Disavows Missile Moratorium; Talks Remain Stalled
On March 2, North Korea exacerbated the already tense nuclear crisis on the Korean peninsula, stating in a lengthy memorandum that Pyongyang is no longer bound by its more than five-year-old moratorium on testing longer-range missiles. Yet, North Korea...
Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zones
Nuclear-weapon-free zones (NWFZ) offer non-nuclear-weapon states a practical path for obtaining legally binding negative security assurances. In the context of nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) diplomacy, such assurances are guarantees by the five...
Pentagon Split on Missile Defense
Two top Pentagon officials gave lawmakers disparate appraisals of the administration's deployed long-range ballistic missile defense system during congressional testimony March 15. The general overseeing the system's development contended it could already...
Slow Start for UN WMD Committee
Nearing the halfway point of its lifespan, a UN committee is just starting its primary task of pin-pointing weak spots in national laws and export controls that terrorists might exploit to acquire missiles and chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons.Established...
The 2005 NPT Review Conference: Can It Meet the Nuclear Challenge?
The nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) was designed to link the concerns of those who acquired nuclear weapons but did not desire further proliferation with those who had not acquired nuclear weapons but wanted the potential to make use of nuclear...
Threat Reduction Budget Detailed
The Department of Defense has outlined how it would like to spend the $415.5 million President George W. Bush requested from Congress earlier this year to help dismantle excess weapons and related infrastructure, particularly in Russia and the former...
UK Spells out Arms Pact
British Foreign Minister Jack Straw set out guidelines March 15 for a global treaty on conventional arms sales that London plans to promote this year. The initiative comes at a time when the European Union is wrestling with whether to waive arms sales...
U.S. Offer Fails to End EU-Iran Impasse
Despite a U.S. offer in March designed to strengthen their hand, three European nations have been unable to produce any major breakthroughs in negotiations with Iran over its nuclear program. Still, both sides have agreed to continue talks, and Iran...
U.S., Russia Seek Help on Plutonium
The Department of Energy is looking for international donations to help pay the substantial costs of shutting down Russia's three remaining nuclear reactors that produce weapons-grade plutonium.This program, originally assigned to the Pentagon in 1997,...