Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 8, December

After Stumble, 'HEU Deal' Back on Track
ON DECEMBER 1, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) dropped its threat to resign as the government's executive agent for the U.S.-Russian Highly-Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement. USEC had threatened to back out of the so-called "HEU deal"...
April Audit
When the 186 members of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) gather in New York in April for the treaty's five-year review conference, the debate will probably focus on the nuclear-weapon states' failure to honor commitments made in connection...
Clarifying India's Nascent Nuclear Doctrine
An Inte With Indian Foreign Minister Jaswant Singh On August 17,1999, India's National Security Advisory Board released its draft report on Indian nuclear doctrine. Though the report maintained that India would pursue a "minimum nuclear deterrent," many...
KEDO Signs Contract to Begin Work on North Korean Reactors
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 1994 Agreed Framework progressed this month with the completion of a turn-key contract between the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) and the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) for the construction of...
NATO Ministers Skeptical of U.S. NMD Plans
THE CLINTON ADMINISTRATION formally briefed NATO defense and foreign affairs ministers for the first time on the proposed architecture for a limited U.S. national missile defense (NWD) system at the alliance's annual December ministerial meetings. Led...
Not a Catastrophe: Another Look at the South Asian Nuclear Tests
Professor William Walker's article, "The Risks of Further Nuclear Testing in South Asia" (ACT, Sept./Oct. 1999), was a welcome departure from what passes these days for scholarship on India and Pakistan. Walker makes a number of important observations...
NPT 2000: Is the Treaty in Trouble?
Spirits were high in May 1995 when the member states of the nuclear NonProliferation Treaty (NPT) extended the treaty indefinitely. The main playersthe non-nuclear-weapon states and the five nuclear-weapon states-achieved enough of their objectives to...
Russia Postpones START II Vote Again
The Russian Duma again postponed consideration of START II on December 8. The treaty, which the U.S. Senate ratified in 1996, has been repeatedly withdrawn at the last minute due to insufficient support, first as a result of U.S.-British airstrikes against...
Security Council Replaces UNSCOM; Paves Way for Inspections, Sanctions Relief
NEARLY A YEAR to the day after Iraq ended its cooperation with UN weapons inspections following the initiation of punitive air strikes by the United States and Britain, the Security Council paved the way for renewed inspections and a measured suspension...
UN Resolution 1284
After months of diplomatic bickering over the appropriate next step in United Nations policy toward Iraq, the Security Council adopted Resolution 1284 (1999 December 17 by a Vote of 11-0-4. (Russia, France, China and Malaysia abstained.) The resolution...
Wassenaar Members Remain Divided on Arrangement's Scope
THE WASSENAAR ARRANGEMENT held its fifth plenary meeting December 13 in Vienna with its 33 members still divided over whether the weapons and dualuse export transparency body should become more than simply a data collection center. While adding new reporting...
What Went Wrong: Repairing the Damage to the CTBT
The record of the CTBT in the Senate suggests that the October 13 vote was not simply 'about the substance of the treaty,' as Senator Lott has claimed. The game of politics rarely produces clear winners or even final results. In the case of the Senate's...