Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 2, March

Administration Clears Way for South African Arms Trade
IN LIFTING sanctions on South Africa's primary weapons companies, the Clinton administration has cleared the way for U.S. arms sales to South Africa for the first time in 35 years. Removal of the prohibitions follows the adoption of export control programs...
After BJP Election Win, Leaders Soften Line on Nuclear Weapons
SINCE WINNING India's parliamentary elections on March 3, the leaders of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have toned down their party's pro-nuclear weapon rhetoric, suggesting New Delhi's nuclear policy may not change as drastically or as quickly as...
CD Closes 1st Session, Establishes One Ad Hoc Committee
AFTER MORE than a year of stalemate, during which the Conference on Disarmament (CD) did not establish any formal negotiating bodies, the Geneva-based forum on March 26 adopted a compromise work program establishing an ad hoc committee on negative security...
Challenges of Nuclear Stockpile Stewardship under a Comprehensive Test Ban
The nuclear weapons policy and posture of the United States face unique political and technical challenges as the country balances a requirement to maintain its nuclear stockpile against the obligation and desire to provide strong leadership in arms...
Chelyabinsk-70: After the Cold War
The Russian Federal Nuclear Center All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Physics (referred to by its Russian acronym of VNIITF) was founded in 1955 to develop nuclear weapons for the Soviet arsenal and to study the effects of nuclear blasts. Known...
Improving Nuclear Materials Security in the Former Soviet Union: Next Steps for the MPC&A Program
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, experts asserted that political and economic instability in the region could drastically weaken the security of hundreds of tons of plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU) suitable for building...
Letters
To the Editor: In his recent remarks to the Arms Control Association members' annual luncheon (See ACT, January/February 1998), Robert Bell, National Security Council senior director for defense policy and arms control, treated U.S. promises not to use...
NATO Expansion: Time for Damage Control
All indications point to early Senate approval of NATO expansion into Eastern Europe. This ill-conceived U.S.-led initiative endangers not only progress in arms control, but also the constructive evolution of both U.S.-Russian relations and Russian democratic...
Panel Criticizes U.S. 'Rush' to Deploy Missile Defense Systems
A NEW STUDY by an independent panel of experts has warned that U.S. ballistic missile defense programs suffer from a "rush to failure" as a consequence of efforts to rapidly deploy such systems before they have been thoroughly flight tested. The study,...
The CTB Treaty and Nuclear Non-Proliferation: The Debate Continues
On March 18, the Senate continued its consideration of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) when the Governmental Affairs Subcommittee on International Security, Proliferation and Federal Services held a hearing on "The Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty...
UNSCOM Completes First Inspections at 'Presidential Sites'
ON APRIL 4, the UN Special Commission (UNSCOM) completed its first round of "Special Group" inspections at eight presidential sites in Iraq that had previously been declared off-limits by Baghdad. This restriction on access, opposed by the United States...
UN Security Council Approves Arms Embargo on Yugoslavia
RESPONDING TO a Serbian crackdown on ethnic Albanians in the Kosovo province, the UN Security Council voted 14-0 (with China abstaining) on March 31 to impose an arms embargo on the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The embargo prohibits the sale or supply...
U.S. Renews Effort to Bring China into Missile Control Regime
THE CLINTON administration dispatched two officials to Beijing in late March to measure Chinese interest in joining the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), an informal suppliers arrangement designed to stem the proliferation of ballistic missiles...
U.S., Russia Take New Steps to Control Technology Transfers to Iran
WITH THE THREAT of congressionally imposed sanctions on Russia hanging over their discussions, Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin agreed to increase bilateral efforts to prevent Russian ballistic missile and other types...
U.S., Ukraine Sign Nuclear Accord, Agree on MTCR Accession
AT A CEREMONY attended by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, the United States and Ukraine signed a nuclear cooperation agreement on March 6, based on a new commitment by Kyiv to end its nuclear cooperation with Iran. In addition, Albright announced...
Yeltsin Government Shake-Up Unlikely to Affect Arms Control
IN LATE March, Russian President Boris Yeltsin unexpectedly dismissed his entire cabinet, including Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, who had just participated in the latest round of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Economic and Technological Cooperation,...