Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 6, August/September

Ambassador Richard Butler: Keeping Iraq's Disarmament on Track
Since taking over as executive chairman of the UN Special Commission on Iraq (UNSCOM) in July 1997, Ambassador Richard Butler has stood at the center of the stormy relationship between Iraq and the United Nations. UNSCOM, established by the UN Security...
CD Convenes Committee to Work on Fissile Cutoff
THE UN CONFERENCE on Disarmament (CD) agreed on August 11 to start talks on banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons purposes. Israel, the last holdout among the 61 member-states, made clear that although it did not object to beginning...
Fortieth Ratification Sets Clock for Ottawa Treaty's Entry into Force
THE OTTAWA CONVENTION banning the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel landmines (APLs) will enter into force on March 1, 1999 after Burkina Faso, on September 16, became the 40th state to ratify the treaty Entry into force is...
Framework Funds Endangered by N. Korean Missile Test, Digging
IN THE LATEST sign of trouble for the U.S.-North Korean Agreed Framework, congressional appropriators on September 2 adopted amendments to the fiscal year 1999 foreign aid bill that could undermine the 1994 agreement. The House of Representatives foreign...
IBM Fined $8.67 Million for Supercomputer Sale
On July 31 a federal district court judge imposed an $8.6 million fine on the Russian subsidiary of International Business Machines (IBM) after the firm pled guilty to selling 17 high-speed computers to a Russian nuclear weapons lab in Sarov (formerly...
Moscow Summit Brings Two Minor Arms Control Agreements
IN A SUMMIT dominated by other issues, including the Russian financial crisis and regional security issues such as Kosovo and Iraq, Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin signed two minor arms controlrelated agreements during their September 1-2 meeting...
N. Korea Launches Staged Rocket That Overflies Japanese Territory
ON AUGUST 31, North Korea launched its first multi-stage rocket in an unsuccessful attempt to place a satellite into orbit. Pyongyang's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) claimed on September 4 that the three-stage system lifted off from Musudan-ri...
NMD Bill Stalled in Senate; New Bill Introduced in House
FOR THE SECOND time this year, on September 9, Senate Republicans fell only one vote short of forcing a floor vote on the "American Missile Protection Act of 1998." The bill (S. 1873), introduced in March by Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS), states that it...
Privatizing U.S. National Security: The U.S.-Russian HEU Deal at Risk
Just before their end-of-summit press conference on September 2, Russian President Boris Yeltsin informed President Bill Clinton that he was going to announce the end of the historic "HEU deal" signed by the two countries in 1993. Under this unprecedented...
Putting National Security First
The U.S. agreement to purchase 500 tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons over 20 years stands out as one of the most important and innovative initiatives of the post-Cold War world. The deal, initiated by President...
Small Arms and Light Weapons: Controlling the Real Instruments of War
One of the dominant features of the global community in the 1990s has been the violent breakdown of civil society in dozens of countries throughout the world. From the socialist states of the former Soviet bloc to Africa and Asia, we have witnessed the...
UN Fixes Sanctions on Iraq, Seeks Renewed Cooperation
IN RESPONSE to Iraq's August 5 decision to cease cooperation with UN weapons inspections, the UN Security Council voted unanimously on September 9 to end its bimonthly reviews of international economic sanctions on Iraq until cooperation resumes. A review...