Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 5, June

Behind Iran's Diplomatic Behavior
News ANALYSISEver since the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) uncovered Iran's previously covert nuclear activities in 2003, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom (later backed by the United States) have attempted to persuade Iran to give up...
"Completely Nuts"
As the international confrontation over Iran's nuclear program gradually escalates, the Bush administration insists it is seeking a diplomatic solution even as it refuses to rule out the possibility of pre-emptive military strikes against Iran. President...
Congress Challenges Global Strike Plan
Congress is challenging a new Pentagon plan to arm some submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs) with conventional warheads. In crafting the fiscal year 2007 defense authorisation bill, lawmakers have also made a few other significant changes to...
Editor's NOTE
STRATCOM Commander Gen. James E. Cartwright has many responsibilities, but two particularly heavy ones: preventing or deterring a nuclear attack from other countries and executing a U.S. nuclear attack if ordered to do so. In this month's cover interview,...
EU Approves Nonproliferation Framework
The European Parliament May 17 approved a seven-year budget framework for the European Union that is likely to lead to that body spending on average euro141 million ($180 million) annually for the period 2007-2013 on non proliferation, disarmament, and...
IAEA Raises New Questions on Iran Program
The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) continues to investigate questions about Iran's nuclear file, specifically Tehran's incomplete and inconsistent accounting of its uranium-enrichment and plutonium-separation activities. Hut an April 28 report...
Indo-Pakistani Talks Advance
Pakistan and India are nearing final agreement on a proposal to reduce the risk of nuclear accidents or unauthorized use of nuclear weapons. According to a joint statement produced at the most recent round of talks on nuclear confidence-building measures...
LOOKING BACK: Going for Baruch: The Nuclear Plan That Refused to Go Away
Sixty years ago, U.S. Ambassador Bernard Baruch addressed the new UN Atomic Energy Commission and outlined a bold and controversial plan for international control or ownership of all "dangerous" nuclear materials and related facilities.1 Six months later,...
Reorganization Run Amok: State Department's WMD Effort Weakened
On July 29, 2005, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced a Department of State reorganization that focused primarily on arms control and nonproliferation efforts. Its stated purpose was to strengthen the State Department's role in "protecting...
Reshaping U.S. Nonproliferation Strategy: An Interview with Undersecretary of State Robert Joseph
The Department of State currently has a full plate of issues on nonproliferation and arms control matters, ranging from trying to resolve nuclear standoffs with Iran and North Korea to promoting a far-reaching U.S. initiative to engage in civilian nuclear...
Small Arms, Large Problem: The International Threat of Small Arms Proliferation and Misuse
The illicit proliferation and misuse of small arms and light weapons1 ranks among today's most pressing security threats. Tens of thousands of people are killed or wounded each year in conflicts that are fought primarily with these weapons and in crime-ridden...
States Agree on BWC Conference Agenda
States-parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) have agreed to an agenda for the treaty's review conference this fall that will include an article-by-article review of the convention. They also left open the possibility of continuing the recent...
Strategic Decisions: An Interview with STRATCOM Commander General James E. Cartwright
The Bush administration set forth its plan for transforming the roles and structure of U.S. strategic forces in its December 2001 Nuclear Posture Review. The revamped posture, according to administration officials, aims to reduce U.S. reliance on nuclear...
UN Extends Committee on Terrorists and Arms
In a unanimous vote April 27, the UN Security Council extended for two years a committee charged with monitoring efforts by states to prevent nonstate actors from acquiring or developing biological, chemical, or nuclear weapons. The vote on Resolution...
U.S. Bars Future Arms Sales to Venezuela
Underscoring its continuing unhappiness with Venezuelan leader Hugo Chavez, Washington announced May 15 that future U.S. arms sales to Venezuela would he prohibited. Although Venezuela is not a major U.S. arms buyer, Venezuelan officials denounced the...
U.S.-Indian Nuclear Deal Simmers
The Bush administration is urging lawmakers to quickly give their approval to a U.S.-Indian civilian nuclear cooperation proposal, but some legislators are expressing reservations about the pace and scope of the deal.President George W. Bush and Prime...
U.S., Libya to Restore Full Diplomatic Relations
The United States is set to re-establish full diplomatic relations with Libya, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced May 15. The same day, President George W. Hush filed a report that will allow Libya to be taken off of the list of state sponsors...
U.S. Offers Iran Direct Talks
The five permanent members of the UN Security Council, along with Germany, are continuing their efforts to craft a new package of incentives and disincentives designed to persuade Iran to end its gas centrifuge-based uraniumenrichment program. Meanwhile,...
U.S. Unveils Draft Fissile Material Treaty
At the 65-member Conference on Disarmament (CD) in Geneva, the United States May 18 unveiled a draft treaty to end production of the two essential ingredients for building nuclear weapons. But prospects for negotiations on the proposal are slim because...