Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 2, March

Another Pendulum Swing?
The Biological Weapons Convention (BWCI entered into forte in 1975, and perceptions of the usefulness of the convention have osculated between seeing it as a heacon of multilateral arms control and viewing it as irrelevant.1 The last two decades have...
BOOK REVIEW: Moving Nonproliferation Forward
BOOK REVIEW: Moving Nonproliferation Forward U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy: Confronting Today's Threats Edited by George Bunn and Christopher F. Chyba Brookings Institution Press, September 2006, 340 pp.Notwithstanding occasional hand-wringing about the...
Bush Cuts Threat Reduction Budget
President George W. Bush's 2008 fiscal year budget request calls for more cuts in programs related to nonproliferation activities in the former Soviet Union, although some individual threat reduction programs would see gains or maintain funding.Some...
Bush Seeks Budget Boost for Future Warhead
The Bush administration wants lawmakers this year to nearly quintuple spending on what it claims will be the prototype future U.S. nuclear warhead. But as of the end of February, Congress was waiting on the administration to choose between two competing...
Chinese Proud, Defensive about ASAT Test
After shooting down one of its weather satellites Jan. 11, the Chinese government mai ntained a battling silence until Jan. 23 when it confirmed foreign reports of the event. Since then, government leaders in Beijing have said little, but the same cannot...
Chinese Satellite Destruction Stirs Debate
In January, China for the first time used a weapon to destroy one of its satellites. Beijing says its feat was not hostile, but it polluted space with a huge amount of potentially harmful debris and sparked debate over China's professed desire to prevent...
Dangerous Dealings: North Korea's Nuclear Capabilities and the Threat of Export to Iran
On Oct. 9, 2006, North Korea conducted a nuclear test and proclaimed itself a world nuclear power. The explosion yield was less than one kiloton, much less than the first nuclear test of other states and even less than the expected yield of four kilotons...
Déjà Vu All over Again
The Cold War may be over, but the nuclear-armed missiles and suspicions remain. Now, Washington's plan to deploy ground-based missile interceptors in the former Eastern Bloc-coupled with the expansion of NATO and the Bush administration's resistance...
Editor's NOTE
On Feb. 13, the United States, North Korea, and four other countries struck a deal on initial steps that could lead to North Korea's nuclear disarmament. Critics on the right and on the left quickly lashed out at the agreement either as too little or...
ElBaradei: Iran's Nuclear Program Advances
Iran has continued to advance its nuclear program in defiance of a December 2006 UN security Council resolution, according to a l-'eb. 22 report from International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei. The agency's Hoard of...
HEU Smuggling Sting Raises Security Concerns
Georgia and the United States revealed in January that in early 2006 they had arrested a Russian man attempting to sell 100 grams of weapons-grade uranium. The seizure was one of the largest of its kind and raised questions about the security of nuclear...
House Approves Nonproliferation Initiatives
The House of Representatives approved several nonprolifcration initiatives in January as part of a broader bill to fully implement the recommendations of an independent commission that investigated the September 1 1 terrorist attacks.Implementing a campaign...
Initial Pact Reached to End North Korean Nuclear Weapons Program
Ou Feb. 13, participants in six-party talks announced that they had agreed on initial steps for ending North Korea's nuclear weapons program. The agreement marked the first concrete sign of progress since the talks stalled almost 18 months ago. Still,...
Iran Receives Smuggled Surplus F-14 Parts
Iran purchased several parts for 1-14 fighter planes from a U.S. military surplus store, according to the results of a federal investigation reported by the Associated Press (AP) Jan. 16. The report prompted the Pentagon to suspend sales of the F-14...
Israeli Cluster Munitions Use Examined
The Department of State recently informed Congress that Israeli use of U.S.-origin cluster munitions in Lebanon last summer might have broken U.S. export rules. Washington has yet to announce if it will take any action against its close ally, but some...
Missile Defense Remains Budget Priority
Anti-missile programs have been a consistent Bush administration funding favorite, and its recent budget request to Congress continues the trend. All told, the Pentagon is seeking approximately $10.8 billion for its various missile defense projects.The...
Out of the Valley: Advancing the Biological Weapons Convention after the 2006 Review Conference
At 6:15 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 8, 2006, the Sixth Review Conference of the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) was brought to a close with smiles, handshakes, and the resounding applause of 103 delegations in Geneva. Less audible was a collective sigh...
Security Council Considers New Iran Sanctions
Senior officials from the five permanent members of the UN security Council and Germany agreed Feb. 26 in London to draft a new council resolution that could impose additional nonmilitary sanctions on Iran. Discussions were preliminary, bowever, and...
Slow Start in 2007 for U.S.-Indian Nuclear Deal
A top U.S. official predicted late last year that if the U.S. and Indian governments "move real fast" in 2007 they would be able to clear India for global civil nuclear trade in six months. But New Delhi has proceeded at a more leisurely pace, waiting...
The UN Process on Small Arms: All Is Not Lost
Small arms and light weapons1 are the weapons of choice for insurgents, terrorists, warlords, and crime syndicates. They undermine stability and security in places as diverse as Afghanistan, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Iraq. These...
The USSR's Past Anti-Satellite Testing
The Soviet Union pursued anti-satellite (ASAT) programs for decades but apparently never smashed a satellite into bits as China did recently and the United States did in 1985. Still, Washington assessed Moscow's capabilities as a viable threat to U.S....
Treaty Update
Comprehensive Test Ban TreatyOn Jan. 19, Moldova ratified the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), making it the final state in Europe to do so. All told, Moldova brings the total number of states that have ratified the treaty up to 138. Montenegro...
UN Battles over Disarmament Bureaucracy
It is a given that every new UN secretary-general has the right to organize the secretariat to his liking-the secretary-general's most explicit responsibility in the UN Charter is of "chief administrative officer of the Organization." However, Ban Ki-moon,...
U.S., Europe Anti-Missile Plans Upset Russia
A U.S. bid to base anti-missile systems in Poland and the Czech Republic is provoking strong reactions from Russia, including hints that it might abrogate a two-decadeold treaty restricting Russian missile holdings.Moscow has consistently opposed Washington's...
U.S. Funding for CTBTO Lags
Accumulating shortfalls in the U.S. contribution to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) could slow its effort to complete a global monitoring network and conduct data analysis designed to detect and deter treaty violations, according...
U.S. Sanctions Iranian, Syrian Entities
As part of its campaign to bankrupt certain foreign arms programs, the United States recently sanctioned several entities from Syria and Iran, including the fifthlargest Iranian state-owned bank, Bank Sepah.In June 2005, President George W. Bush authorized...