Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 2, March

Affiliations and Nuclear Activities of 172 NPT Parties
In May, a majority of the parties to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) are expected to approve the terms of extension for the 25-year-old treaty, a vote that will be binding on all NPT parties. A large number, but not a majority, of states have...
Clinton Signs Arms Sales Directive, Dashing Hopes for Reduced Transfers
PRESIDENT BILL Clinton has signed a new conventional arms transfer policy formalizing his administration's support for continued high levels of U.S. arms sales and its commitment to help the U.S. defense industry maintain its predominance in international...
Extending the NPT: What Are the Options?
The future of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) will be decided at the 1995 review and extension conference in New York April 17 to May 12. While the duration of most arms control treaties is included in the treaty itself,...
Final 'PrepCom' Fails to Decide NPT Voting Procedure
WITH ONLY weeks remaining until the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) review and extension conference, delegates to the fourth and final Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meeting failed again to agree on the most crucial outstanding issue facing NPT...
Key NPT Conference Issues
When representatives from nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) member states meet in New York April 17 to May 12 for the long-anticipated review and extension conference, the only action required of them is their vote on the future duration of the...
NPT Endgame '95: Finish Strong
Prospects appear very that the requisite majority will vote for indefinite extension of the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) at the April 17 to May 12 conference marking the 25th anniversary of history's most important and most widely endorsed...
START II Moves Forward in Senate; Russian Ratification Less Certain
THE START II agreement is now expected to sail smoothly through Senate hearings and obtain approval before the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) review and extension conference opens in New York in April. Prospects for early ratification by the...
Summary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty
The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT), which was opened for signature July 1, 1968, and entered into force March 5, 1970, has become the most widely adhered-to arms control agreement in history, with over 170 member states. It...
The End of the Beginning or the Beginning of the End? -- 1995: A New Beginning for the NPT? by Joseph F. Pilat and Robert E. Pendley
Joseph F. Pilat and Robert E. Pendley, editors, 1995: A New Beginning for the NPT? New York: Plenum Publishing Corporation, 1995, 332 pp., cloth, $59.50.Non-proliferation partisans are anxiously anticipating the silver anniversary this year of the nuclear...
The NPT: A Global Success Story
This special issue is devoted to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) review and extension conference that will meet in New York from April 17 to May 12 to decide the future duration of this important treaty, which provides the framework for the...
The Nuclear-Weapon States and Article VI of the NPT
At the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) review and extension conference in New York April 17 to May 12, the 172 states currently party to the NPT will decide the future of the most successful arms control agreement in history. A critical issue...
Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons
Signed July 1, 1968, in Washington, London and Moscow.Ratification advised by the U.S. Senate March 13, 1969.Ratified by the U.S. president November 24,1969.U.S. instrument of ratification deposited at Washington, London and Moscow March 5, 1970.Proclaimed...
U.S., Allies Create Consortium for Korean Nuclear Deal
IN A STEP toward implementing the U.S.-North Korean agreed nuclear framework statement, on March 9 that United States, South Korea and Japan formally established the international consortium to oversee the financing and construction of two nuclear reactors...
U.S. Drops CTB 'Early Out' Plan; Test Moratorium May Be Permanent
IN A REVERSAL of earlier policy, National Security Adviser Anthony Lake announced January 30 that Washington had decided to withdraw its highly controversial proposal to allow an "easy exit" after 10 years from the comprehensive test ban (CTB) treaty...