Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 6, July/August

111 Countries Approve Cluster Munitions Treaty
On May 30 in Dublin, 111 countries agreed to the text of a new treaty that calls for the clearance and destruction of virtually all existing cluster munitions but will permit the use of more advanced cluster-like arms. However, backers of the new Convention...
Air Force Leaders Fired over Nuke Handling
Secretary of Defense Robert Gates fired Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. T. Michael Moseley and Secretary of the Air Force Michael Wynne on June 5 after a report by Navy Adm. Kirkland Donald highlighted significant oversights in the Air Force's nuclear...
Before the Day After: Using Pre-Detonation Nuclear Forensics to Improve Fissile Material Security
The next U.S. administration will face many daunting challenges, but none of these are likely to be as pressing as combating the threat posed by nuclear terrorism. Twelve years ago, experts identified "nuclear leakage" -the sale, theft, and diversion...
Bush's Nuclear Reprocessing Plan under Fire
The Bush administration's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program, already under siege, has been further imperiled after recent action by several congressional panels and an April report from the congressional watchdog agency.Administration...
Candidates Differ on Iran, Agree on Sanctions
Over the past month, the issue of how the United States will address Iran's nuclear program has become one of the centerpieces of the foreign policy debate between the two presumptive major-party presidential candidates. The candidates differ in particular...
Editor's NOTE
When a new U.S. president takes office in January 2009, he will be confronted with a host of arms control and nonproliferation challenges.At the top of his list should be finding a way to preserve the strategic reassurance provided by START I, which...
EU Levies Sanctions on Iran
The European Union agreed June 23 to impose a new set of sanctions against Iranian individuals and organizations involved in Iran's nuclear and missile programs. The new sanctions go beyond the measures contained in UN Security Council Resolution 1803,...
High-Level Panel Calls for Stronger IAEA
In a May report to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors, a panel of prominent international leaders recommends that the agency assume additional responsibilities and perhaps double its budget by 2020 in order to ensure a substantial...
IAEA South Korean Concerns Resolved
The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said June 3 that its concerns about the peaceful nature of South Korea's nuclear program had been resolved after concluding an investigation that began four years ago. The announcement came as South Korea...
Interdiction Initiative Successes Assessed
Commandos rappelling down ropes from a helicopter to a ship deck or navy forces boarding a vessel at sea are images often associated with a Bush administration initiative to intercept unconventional weapons or related cargo in transit. Actual interdictions...
Iran Presented with Revamped Incentives
On June 14, the five permanent members of the UN Security Council and Germany formally presented Iran with a revised proposal for comprehensive negotiations aimed at resolving concerns over Tehran's nuclear ambitions. The incentives package builds on...
Israel's Airstrike on Syria's Reactor: Implications for the Nonproliferation Regime
On September 6, 2007, in a surprise dawn attack, seven Israeli warplanes destroyed an industrial facility near al-Kibar, Syria, later identified by the CIA as a nearly completed nuclear reactor secretly under construction since 2001.1 According to the...
LOOKING BACK: The Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty Then and Now
Less than a year after dropping nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, the United States adopted a statute prohibiting the transfer of its nuclear weapons to any other country. It was not until 23 years later, however, that countries began...
Missile Defense Role Questioned
Is the deployed U.S. anti-missile system capable enough to have a president rely on it to protect American lives if a hostile regime threatened to use long-range ballistic missiles to attack the United States? Some current administration officials say...
New Presidents, New Agreements? Advancing U.S.-Russian Strategic Arms Control
With the Sochi Declaration in April 2008, the poker players in Washington and Moscow effectively laid down their strategic arms control cards for the last time in the Bush and Putin administrations. They reiterated their intention to carry out further...
North Korea Delivers Nuclear Declaration
Pyongyang June 26 delivered its long-awaited declaration on its nuclear programs to China, the chair of the six-party talks aimed at denuclearizing North Korea. The six countries, which also include Japan, Russia, South Korea, and the United States,...
Pentagon Calls for More DTRA Support
A recently declassified report from a Department of Defense review panel calls on the government to provide more political and financial support to a Pentagon agency that is tasked with defending the United States from weapons of mass destruction (WMD)....
Rethink European Missile Defense
Within weeks of entering office, the next U.S. president will be confronted with dozens of pivotal choices. One of the most important will be whether to install untested missile defenses in eastern Europe to deal with an Iranian missile threat that does...
Russian Plutonium-Producing Reactors Closed
On June 5, Rosatom closed the sole remaining reactor at the Siberian Chemical Combine, located in Seversk, ending the city's 43 years of weapons-grade plutonium production and bringing Russia one step closer to ending production of weapons-grade plutonium.Production...
Senate Committee Completes Iraq Intel Probe
The Senate Select Committee on Intelligence June 5 completed its long-delayed investigation into U.S. intelligence on Iraq prior to the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of that country. The final portions of the investigation entailed a comparison of prewar intelligence...
Shorter-Range Missile Defenses Show Progress
Despite continuing concerns about the capability and testing of Pentagon efforts to develop and deploy anti-missile systems to protect against long-range ballistic missiles, less controversial programs to counter shorter-range missiles are enjoying some...
States Divest from Businesses Tied to Iran
Eleven U.S. states have adopted legislation to divest public pension funds from companies with financial ties to Iran's petroleum, defense, and nuclear sectors in an attempt to persuade Iran to give up its uranium-enrichment program and alleged sponsorship...
Swiss Destroy Key A.Q. Khan Evidence
Swiss President Pascal Couchepin announced May 23 that his government destroyed files associated with a case against Swiss nationals suspected of involvement in the illicit nuclear trafficking network run by Pakistani nuclear official Abdul Qadeer Khan....
U.S. Issues Broad Threat to WMD Accomplices
Serious consequences await those that aid terrorists in acquiring or using unconventional weapons under a new policy that national security adviser Stephen Hadley has broadcast. The Bush administration, however, is not clarifying whether the punishment...
U.S. Presses Poland on Anti-Missile Site
Frustrated by Polish negotiating demands on a plan to install U.S. anti-missile interceptors in Poland, the United States recently said it had other basing options. Despite vigorous Russian opposition to the potential interceptor deployment in a former...