Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 3, April/May

Assessing the Cost vs. Benefit of U.S.-Chinese Scientific Cooperation
The Cox Report nominally addresses concerns about U.S. national security originating from scientific and technical interactions with the People's Republic of China (PRC). It alleges extensive losses of valuable national security information but does...
Belgrade Suspends Implementation of Sub-Regional Arms Accord
ONE WEEK AFTER NATO began its bombing campaign against Yugoslav territory and military forces, Belgrade suspended implementation of the June 1996 Agreement on Sub-Regional Arms Control, but stressed that the move was not a withdrawal from the regime....
CD Remains in Stalemate; U.S. Criticized for NMD Plans
HALFWAY THROUGH its 1999 negotiating session, the UN Conference on Disarmament (CD) is no closer to beginning negotiations than when the session started in January. Differences on nuclear disarmament and preventing an arms race in outer space are holding...
Cox Panel Charges China with Extensive Nuclear Espionage
THE UNITED STATES has been the victim of a sustained Chinese espionage campaign alleged to have acquired classified information on seven types of U.S. thermonuclear weapons, a bipartisan select committee from the House of Representatives reported May...
Cox Report Overview
Important Note: This declassified report summarizes many important findings and judgments contained in the Select Committee's classified Report, issued January 3, 1999. LI.S. intelligence and law enforcement agencies within the Clinton administration...
Divisions and Doubts at the Third NPT PrepCom
The states-parties to the nuclear NonProliferation Treaty (NPT) will undertake a full review of the treaty in April-May 2000, the first since 1995, when the accord was effectively made permanent. The third Preparatory Committee (PrepCom) meeting for...
Don't Let Furor from Cox Report Undermine U.S.-Russian Cooperation
The China nuclear spying furor has led to calls from some in Congress for major changes in U.S. collaboration with foreign scientists on non-proliferation and arms control activities. Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Shelby, for one, has...
Hyping Chinese Espionage
With little evidence and flawed logic, the Cox Report has concluded that China, exploiting purloined U.S. nuclear weapons design information, can now match U.S. nuclear weapons technology and emerge as a major nuclear threat to the United States. The...
India, Pakistan Test New Missiles; U.S. Urges Restraint
BUILDING ON their tit-for-tat nuclear tests of May 1998, India and Pakistan conducted test flights of new nuclear-capable ballistic missiles on April 11 and on April 14 and 15, respectively, bringing both states closer to deploying strategic arsenals...
Introductory Note from the Damage Assessment Review Panel
This damage assessment was reviewed by a panel of independent, national security and weapons experts-Admiral David Jeremiah, General Brent Scowcroft, Dr. John Foster, Mr. Richard Kerr, Dr. Roland Herbst, and Mr. Howard Schue-prior to its publication....
Keep the Facts of the Cox Report in Perspective
The Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China (PRC) was chartered in the wake of allegations about U.S. satellites launched on PRC rockets. Three rocket failures over 38 months were...
Kerrey Amendment on Nuclear Reductions Defeated
On May 26, the Senate defeated an amendment to the fiscal year (FY) 2000 defense authorization bill that would have removed the provision, in effect since 1998, barring U.S. nuclear arms reductions below START I levels until START II enters into force....
Key Findings of the Intelligence Community Damage Assessment
Chinese strategic nuclear efforts have focused on developing and deploying a survivable long-range missile force that can hold a significant portion of the U.S. and Russian populations at risk in a retaliatory strike. By at least the late 1970s the Chinese...
NATO Unveils 'Strategic Concept' at 50th Anniversary Summit
AT ITS 50TH anniversary summit April 23-25 in Washington, NATO adopted a new "strategic concept" formally recasting the alliance's Cold War-era mission from collective defense to one that, in the words of NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana, will guarantee...
NMD Bill Clears Congress as Senate Re-Examines ABM Treaty
IN LATE MAY, the House approved legislation stating that it is U.S. policy to both deploy an "effective" national missile defense (NMD) system "as soon as is technologically possible" and to "seek continued negotiated reductions in Russian nuclear forces."...
Nuclear Weapons-Related Recommendations of the Cox Committee
Transmitted on January 3,1999, to the President and Congress 1. Semi-Annual Report by the President on PRC Espionage The Select Committee recommends that the President report to the Speaker and Minority Leader of the House, and the Majority Leader and...
Ottawa Convention States-Parties Hold First Conference; U.S. Attends
AT THE FIRST meeting of the statesparties to the Ottawa Convention banning the use, stockpiling, production and transfer of anti-personnel landmines (APLs), representatives of 96 signatories met to start putting the convention, which entered into force...
Russian Compliance with CFE 'Flank' Limit in Doubt
WHILE REMAINING within overall weapons limits under the 1992 Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty, Russia is suspected of not being in compliance with its revised "flank-zone" limits on armored combat vehicles (ACVs), which entered into force...
Security Council Remains Divided over Iraqi Arms Regime, Sanctions
AFTER NEARLY SIX months without UN weapons inspections in Iraq, the UN Security Council remains divided on how to implement Resolution 687, which requires Iraq to eliminate its proscribed weapons before economic sanctions can be lifted. Russia, China...
The Cox Report's 'Dirty Little Secret'
To the uninitiated reader, the Cox Report presents an ominous picture of pervasive, sustained Chinese espionage and illicit technology acquisition breathtaking in its scope, scale and effectiveness. The document alleges extreme laxity in U.S. security...
The CWC at the Two-Year Mark: An Interview with Dr. John Gee
In the little more than two years since it entered into force on April 29, 1997, the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) has become one of the most widely adhered to arms control treaties in the world. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons...
U.S. Ratifies Amended CCW Landmines Protocol
ON MAY 20, the Senate approved the amended landmines protocol (Protocol II) to the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW), the 1980 accord that limits the use of fragmentation weapons, landmines and booby-traps, incendiary weapons and blinding laser...
U.S. Says N. Korea Site Nuclear Free; Perry Visits Pyongyang
U.S. Says N. Korea Site Nuclear Free; Perry Visits Pyongyang FOLLOWING THE determination by a U.S. inspection team that a North Korean underground construction site did not contain facilities relating to nuclear weapons, presidential envoy William Perry...
Why China Won't Build U.S. Warheads
Despite the uncertainty as to how much information on U.S. thermonuclear weapons has actually been compromised, the charges in the Cox Report are sufficiently serious that one should examine the extent to which the acquisition of such information by...