Arms Control Today

Arms Control Today is a magazine published 10 times a year by the Arms Control Association in Washington, DC. Founded in 1972, its subjects are international arms control issues, peace and international affairs. Its audience includes policy makers, educators and the general public.

Articles from Vol. 37, No. 6, July/August

Anti-Nuclear Terrorism Strategies Discussed
On June 11, some 38 partner states of the nearly one-year-old Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism convened for the third meeting in Astana, Kazakhstan, to discuss future prospects. In a simultaneous meeting, representatives from close to 30...
An Unrealized Nexus? WMD-Related Trafficking, Terrorism, and Organized Crime in the Former Soviet Union
The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, powerfully advanced the notion that terrorist groups might acquire and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD) or, more plausibly, radiological dispersal devices (RDD). Terrorist interest in weapons of mass...
BOOK REVIEW: The Wisdom of Sharing the Peaceful Atom
BOOK REVIEW: The Wisdom of Sharing the Peaceful Atom Atoms for Peace: A Future after Fifty Years? Edited by Joseph F. Pilat Johns Hopkins University Press, March 2007, 392 ppWhen President Dwight Eisenhower made his historic Atoms for Peace address to...
Cluster Munitions Control Efforts Make Gains
The clock appears to be ticking on the unconstrained use of cluster munitions. The ranks of a Norwegian-led initiative to prohibit these types of weapons have swelled to approximately 70 countries. Meanwhile, the United States recently switched its position...
Conventional Arms Treaty Dispute Persists
Russia and NATO are still at odds over a European conventional arms pact despite an emergency meeting June 11-15 to discuss their differences. Russia is complaining that its long-standing concerns are still being ignored but has not suspended implementation...
Editor's NOTE
It is perhaps the scenario most dreaded by the American public and U.S. national security experts: Organized crime gangs take advantage of poorly secured former Soviet nuclear materials and smuggle a bomb's worth of nuclear material across unguarded...
ElBaradei: IAEA Budget Problems Dangerous
Budget constraints are jeopardizing the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ability to perform vital parts of its mission, particularly those most closely related to preventing the spread of nuclear weapons, Director- General Mohamed ElBaradei...
Following the Clues: The Role of Forensics in Preventing Nuclear Terrorism
Although the more than 50 incidents of trafficking in nuclear and radiological materials each year are worrisome, these cases also provide valuable insight to the movement of these materials worldwide. Conducting thorough investigations that utilize...
IAEA, Congress Tackle Nuclear Fuel Supply
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director-General Mohamed ElBaradei June 13 presented the agency's Board of Governors with a report outlining ways countries might work together to discourage the spread of uranium enrichment and spent fuel reprocessing...
In Memoriam: Charles William Maynes Jr
Reviewing a biography in The New York Times on British arms control advocate and scientist Solly Zuckerman, Charles William "Bill" Maynes Jr. wrote, "One of life's mysteries is why some individuals accomplish so much." Maynes exemplified this mystery:...
Iran-Iraq Chemical Warfare Aftershocks Persist
Almost two decades after the end of the Iran-Iraq War, the conflict's chemical weapons legacy lingers in the streets of Ramadi and in courtrooms throughout the world. Iranian, Kurdish, and U.S. victims of Iraq's chemical weapons are seeking judicial...
Iran Offers to Resolve Issues with IAEA
Iran has invited International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials to visit Tehran in order to "develop an action plan for resolving outstanding issues" related to the country's past nuclear activities, agency spokesperson Melissa Fleming announced...
Lawmakers Sideline New U.S. Nuclear Warhead
Congress has yet to complete the raft of bills governing U.S. nuclear funding and policy for the next fiscal year, but the early returns are not promising for the Bush administration's program to develop a new nuclear warhead. Lawmakers say they want...
Libya Backs out of CW Destruction Agreement
Vowing to take sole responsibility for destroying its chemical weapons, Libya has annulled its contract with the United States. The Libyan government cancelled the agreement, effective June 14, because of dissatisfaction with its provisions on liability,...
Missile Defense Collision Course
When President George W. Bush withdrew from the 1972 U.S.-Soviet Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty five years ago, he asserted that "my decision to withdraw from the treaty will not, in any way, undermine our new relationship or Russian security." Now, Bush's...
More Than Words: The Value of U.S. Non-Nuclear-Use Promises
Last year, for the first time, the United States voted in the UN General Assembly against a traditional resolution calling for negotiation of legally binding negative security assurances (NSAs) by nuclear-weapon states. These are promises not to use...
North Korea Reactor Shutdown Looms
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) officials visited North Korea in late June, almost two weeks after Pyongyang agreed to finish implementing a February pledge to halt its nuclear reactor. Another meeting of six-party talks designed to resolve...
Not Going Nuclear: Japan's Response to North Korea's Nuclear Test
Since North Korea's nuclear test on October 9, 2006, there has been considerable foreign speculation that the explosion might prompt Japan to develop its own nuclear weapons arsenal. These views do not reflect the relatively restrained reaction in Japan...
Nuclear Talks Waiting on the United States
U.S. and Russian negotiators have put on hold talks on measures to succeed a landmark nuclear weapons reduction treaty while the Bush administration figures out its positions. But U.S. lawmakers are already starting to volunteer their advice.The 1991...
Sanctions on Iran Grow
During the past several months, the U.S. Departments of State and the Treasury have placed sanctions on several Iranian entities that they claim have engaged in activities related to Tehran's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Meanwhile, the international...
Taiwan Buys U.S. Arms; U.S. Eyes China
Taiwan's legislature recently approved buying a dozen anti-submarine planes, a modest portion of an original $18 billion U.S. arms package offered six years ago. The purchase comes amid persistent U.S. questions about China's military modernization and...
The U.S. Government Has Been Promoting Nuclear Proliferation/Harold A. Feiveson, Lawrence Scheinman, and Sharon Squassoni Respond
All too often, those interested in arms control are sidetracked by misunderstandings rampant in the academic community about technical factors associated with nonproliferation. Civilian nuclear power - more a peaceful digression and buffer from international...
Treaty Update
Chemical Weapons ConventionAfter missing its original April 2004 deadline, the United States completed demilitarizing 45 percent of its chemical weapons stockpiles in June, six months ahead of the extended deadline. Since the Chemical Weapons Convention's...
U.S.-Indian Talks Fail to Move Nuclear Deal
Top U.S. and Indian officials failed recently to jump-start their stalled negotiations on a bilateral civil nuclear cooperation agreement that both governments hail as a centerpiece of their new relationship.The two sides sought to favorably portray...
U.S. Reaffirms Europe Anti-Missile Plan
Russian President Vladimir Putin's June 7 proposal to share radar data on missiles with the United States might be an earnest offer, a cynical ploy to undercut U.S. plans to base anti-missile systems in Europe, or both. Regardless, U.S. leaders say they...