The New Yorker

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 6, 2003

A BAGHDAD BLOGGER Series: 3/5
During the past five months, a Manhattan office worker named Diane has exchanged nearly a hundred e-mails with Salam, a young architect in Baghdad. She is an unmarried Jew who lives on the Upper West Side; he is a closeted gay Iraqi from a wealthy family....
AFTER THE BATTLE Series: 1/4
On June 12, 1945, a month after V-E Day, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces in Europe, Dwight D. Eisenhower, received an ancient honor, the "freedom" of the City of London. In his address that day, at Guildhall, General Eisenhower said: Humility...
Big Loser, Small Winner
In "Dreamcatcher," the new big-budget horror film from Warner Bros., based on a novel by Stephen King and directed by Lawrence Kasdan, an abominable worm shows up, the kind of horror-film beast with more teeth than William F. Buckley and an infinite...
[ Briefly Noted ]
The Gate, by Francois Bizot, translated from the French by Euan Cameron (Knopf; $24.95). In 1971, Bizot, a French anthropologist in Cambodia, was taken captive by the Khmer Rouge and accused of spying. This unsparing memoir recounts his internment in...
Criminal Justice
"Without a Trace," CBS's Thursday-night drama about the New York City Missing Persons Squad of the F.B.I., is one of the handful of shows to have emerged during Jerry Bruckheimer's short but impressively productive television career; better known until...
How It Came to War
Washington had a vertiginous feeling last week as the endlessly debated war against Iraq finally began. For the previous six months, the capital had surely been the most pro-Iraq-war city in the world: George W. Bush had given a textbook demonstration...
Loudmouth
Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev was the unquestioned leader of the Soviet Union from 1957 to 1964. In this fairly short span, he managed to provoke two major international crises; survive a coup (a second toppled him); order two disastrous economic overhauls;...
Men of Substance
"This is the doctrine of the true church on the subject of opium," Thomas De Quincey wrote, "of which church I acknowledge myself to be the only member." Many lonely worshippers congregate in UNDER THE INFLUENCE: THE LITERATURE OF ADDICTION, an anthology...
One-Way Street
In a land of chunky, garish, anxiousto-please books, Don DeLillo's thirteenth novel, "Cosmopolis" (Scribner; $25), is physically cool, as sleek and silver-touched and palely pure as a white stretch limo, which is in fact the action's main venue. On the...
Quercy
242 Court St., Brooklyn (718-243-2151)--Every neighborhood has a cursed address, a storefront that's home to a series of snakebit businesses. In Cobble Hill, it's 242 Court Street, a mid-block shoebox with tin ceilings and exposed brick--exactly the...
The Bombing of Baghdad
The morning the first cruise missiles hit Baghdad, on March 20th, I was in a suite at the Al Rashid hotel, in a room facing south, which provided good reception for satellite phones and a panoramic view of some primary targets: the telecommunications...
The Devil's Accountant
On Thursday evenings at M.I.T., Noam Chomsky, one of the greatest minds of the twentieth century and one of the most reviled, teaches a class about politics. There are nearly two hundred students and not enough chairs, so latecomers sit or lie down on...
THE PRIME MINISTER Series: 3/4
In London, the cultural draw of the season has been the Titian exhibition at the National Gallery. The curators have gathered paintings that have not hung together for more than four hundred years, and the galleries are staying open four evenings a week...
THE PROTESTERS Series: 4/4
Marchers converged on Times Square from every direction on Thursday afternoon. From the Farley Post Office, on Eighth Avenue, came New Yorkers Say No to War, Peace Initiative Turkey, and Code Pink: Women for Peace. The War Resisters League marched in...
The Tee Room
In the first week of 2003, I had lunch at the Russian Tea Room, which had gone bankrupt and closed its doors forever in the middle of 2002. Among the still hovering samovars, I ate takein pizza with tomatoes and fresh garlic. Rand Jerris, in the role...
To Hell and Back
"Berlioz believed neither in God nor in Bach, neither in absolute beauty in art nor in pure virtue in life," his friend Ferdinand Hiller recalled. The composer of the "Symphonie Fantastique" retains a fashionably satanic aura, and the reputation is well...
TV GOES TO WAR Series: 2/4
"Shock and awe": it was no euphemism. Not since September 11, 2001, has the world seen images of such tremendous devastation occurring in such an unbelievably short amount of time. Beginning at around 9 p.m. in Baghdad on Friday, as many as two dozen...
Who Lied to Whom?
Last September 24th, as Congress prepared to vote on the resolution authorizing President George W. Bush to wage war in Iraq, a group of senior intelligence officials, including George Tenet, the Director of Central Intelligence, briefed the Senate Foreign...
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