The New Yorker

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 25, 2007

APPALACHIAN AUTUMN; A Critic at Large
On May 8, 1945, the streets of American cities filled with throngs celebrating the Allied victory over fascism in Europe. That week, Aaron Copland, a forty-four-year-old Brooklyn-born composer of Russian-Jewish descent, received a Pulitzer Prize for...
AVENGING ANGEL; Books
In the summer of 1812, as the half million soldiers of the Grande Armee marched across Europe in Napoleon's doomed Russian campaign, a nineteen-year-old in the Devonshire village of Lynmouth set out to change the history of Europe all on his own. Anyone...
BEWARE BAILOUTS; the Financial Page
In August of 1998, disaster loomed for the U.S. economy. Panic among investors after Russia defaulted on its sovereign bonds led to plummeting stock prices and a freeze on global credit markets. The hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management saw its multibillion-dollar...
CAFe ST. BART'S; Tables for Two
Among the skyscrapers that dominate Park Avenue just north of Grand Central Terminal, the Byzantine Romanesque fantasy of St. Bartholomew's Church, with its dome, arches, and rose windows, looms as an unexpected outcrop of curves. A few years ago, it...
DRIVING DRUNKS; Piggybank Dept
At twenty-five minutes after ten on a recent Thursday night, a man came bounding off the SeaStreak ferry in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey. It had been an hour since he boarded the boat, at Pier 11 on Wall Street, and, judging from his erratic stride,...
HE THAT PLAYS THE KING; Profiles
Strolling through Limehouse, in London's East End, you pass streets, like Shoulder of Mutton Alley, that still give off a whiff of Elizabethan hurly-burly, and ancient pubs like the Grapes, which has been serving ale from the same spot since 1583. Soon...
LONE SAILORS; the Current Cinema
A man and a woman go for a walk in Turin. They have just made love in the afternoon, or, at any rate, spent time in a hotel room, talking about how difficult it is to find time to make love, or to talk. Simply to get out feels like a liberation. It must...
PAST PERFECT; the Sky Line
In an essay titled "The Plight of the Prosperous," published in 1950 in this magazine, Lewis Mumford dismissed the living accommodations of upscale New Yorkers as little better than slums. "I sometimes wonder what self-hypnosis has led the well-to-do...
POSH SPICES; Royals
The importance of eating seasonally and locally has become a guiding principle among the increasing number of Britons who take seriously the environmental impact and gustatory quality of their mealtimes; and it is reassuring to know that the principle...
ROVIAN WAYS; Comment
Most politicians find the cult of the political consultant annoying, but George W. Bush always seemed to find it very annoying. When he began running for President, he insisted, as candidates rarely do, that all his top advisers work only for him. So...
SKUNKED; Wo-O-O Dept
There might be an appliance theme to the haunting of the Merchant's House, a nineteenth-century town house in the East Village that was owned by a single family until 1933, when it was turned into a museum. In the nineteen-seventies, someone decided...
SOWING FOR APOCALYPSE; Annals of Agriculture
Correction appended.A cold drizzle was falling over St. Petersburg last March, and the gray morning light filtered through the grimy windows of the ceremonial rooms of the Vavilov Research Institute of Plant Industry, one of the oldest seed banks--and...
THE HUMAN BOMB; Letter from France
To understand Nicolas Sarkozy, who has been President of France for three intense months, it helps to know the story of the human bomb. "It was in 1993, when Sarkozy was the mayor of Neuilly," Philippe Labro, the novelist and talk-show host, recalled...
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