The New Yorker

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 3, 2009

A Passage to India
Jazz musicians have two fundamental goals: creating music that keeps listeners wondering what's next, and finding a novel context within which to explore old truths. (There are no new truths.) Whenever a musician achieves this synthesis, usually after...
A Passage to India
Jazz musicians have two fundamental goals: creating music that keeps listeners wondering what's next, and finding a novel context within which to explore old truths. (There are no new truths.) Whenever a musician achieves this synthesis, usually after...
Gitmo Get-Together
Forgive a few Chelsea residents for staring in confusion at a sign that was recently taped to their building's front door: a "Gitmo Party"--the neighbors in 6-E were throwing one--does, on first glance, seem akin to "Abu Ghraib Cocktails" or "Prom Night...
Lesbian Nation
There was a time, briefly, when women ruled the world. Well, their world, anyway. In the late nineteen-seventies, several thousand women in North America decided not to concern themselves with equal pay for equal work, or getting their husbands to do...
Life during Wartime
Chief among the many astonishments that the new Presidency brings to American culture is the fact that, with a strong black woman co-presiding over the White House, black femininity may break free, once and for all, from the notion of powerlessness;...
Matthew Williamson
What recession? At the opening-night party for the British designer Matthew Williamson's three-thousand-square-foot boutique full of optimistically hued frocks, throngs dressed in New York black waited their turns to squeeze inside--except, that is,...
Nice Work If You Can Get It
This is the Age of the Incredible Shrinking Everything. Home prices, the stock market, G.D.P., corporate profits, employment: they're all a fraction of what they once were. Yet amid this carnage there is one thing that, surprisingly, has continued to...
Notes from Beyond
"We have no reliable guarantee that the afterlife will be any less exasperating than this one, have we?" Noel Coward wrote in his 1941 comedy "Blithe Spirit." The play will soon be revived at the Shubert, with Angela Lansbury starring as a medium who...
Paper Chase
For the past few weeks, forty-six cardboard boxes sat moldering on the waterfront in Long Island City, not far from where workers were reassembling the seventy-two-year-old neon Pepsi sign. The boxes were on Fifth Street, which dead-ends in Anable Basin,...
Parallel Worlds
I have been to Poland just once, briefly, in 1978, to talk about movies, but I kept meeting people there who wanted to talk about something else--the Soviet betrayal of their country. In particular, they were obsessed with a single event: the murder...
Talk It Up
Popular fiction is supposed to be essentially story-driven; the proof that it works is the sound of the pages turning. But a few of the great pop writers were stylists, above all, and their success is measured by a different sound, that of the snort...
The Actress
Natalie Dessay, the soprano, descended a staircase into the rehearsal room at the Metropolitan Opera with the poise of a countess entering a ballroom, dressed in skinny black pants, high heels, and a belted black jacket, her eyes shielded by enormous...
The Back Channel
Two years ago, Pervez Musharraf, who was then Pakistan's President and Army chief, summoned his most senior generals and two Foreign Ministry officials to a series of meetings at his military office in Rawalpindi. There, they reviewed the progress of...
The Gatekeeper
Rahm Emanuel's office, which is no more than a three-second walk from the Oval Office, is as neat as a Marine barracks. On his desk, the files and documents, including leatherbound folders from the National Security Council, are precisely arranged, each...
Voter, Beware
The Voting Rights Act, which passed in 1965, stands as one of the great monuments to civil rights in American history. The Fifteenth Amendment, ratified in 1870, purported to give Americans the right to vote regardless of "race, color, or previous condition...
Whedon's World
Joss Whedon, the creator of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," its spinoff "Angel" (which was co-created with David Greenwalt), "Firefly," and a new Friday-night show on Fox called "Dollhouse," has a fan following that is probably more clamorously devoted than...
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