The New Yorker

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 3, 2003

[ Briefly Noted ]
Repetition, by Alain Robbe-Grillet, translated from the French by Richard Howard (Grove; $23). The grand old man of the nouveau roman has published his first novel in two decades, and, faithful to its title, it is not at all new but, rather, a variation...
Connecting the Dots
In the fall of 1973, the Syrian Army began to gather a large number of tanks, artillery batteries, and infantry along its border with Israel. Simultaneously, to the south, the Egyptian Army cancelled all leaves, called up thousands of reservists, and...
Culture Shocks
Among its other accomplishments, "Laurel Canyon" is to be congratulated for addressing the ever-topical question of whether, why, and, above all, where you should have sex with your mother-in-law-to-be. The answers, in case you're interested, are as...
Drk
114 Dyckman St. (212-304-1717)--"During the week we get a lot of Americans," the waiter said. It isn't often that you're considered a foreign national seven miles from home, but such is the Dominican dominion over Dyckman Street and the distance from...
Eyes on the Prize
The world of architecture has rarely been as lively as it was recently, during the competition for the commission to design a master plan for the World Trade Center site. It was a story about art and culture that had popular appeal, and both the tabloids...
Lost in the Jihad
Five weeks ago, John Walker Lindh, better known as the American Taliban, was quietly transferred to a medium-security prison northeast of Los Angeles, in the Mojave Desert. He was relieved by the move, which took place after federal officials in Alexandria,...
MUST-SEE SADDAM Series: 2/5
Saddam Hussein looks good in a suit, doesn't he? What was that green notebook on the table for? He holds a pen in his right hand--guess that means he's right-handed. The pen: isn't that a Uni-Ball Vision, the one where you can see how much ink is left...
Mycological Positivism
Nicholas P. Money is wild about mushrooms. "I count myself among the few humans who love fungi, truly, madly, deeply," he writes in MR. BLOOMFIELD'S ORCHARD (Oxford), a companionable foray into the realm of stinkhorns, black mold, yeast, and even Malassezia,...
Parlor Music
Edouard Vuillard, who is the subject of a huge retrospective of paintings, drawings, prints, decorative projects, and photographs at the National Gallery in Washington, D.C., was one of the great fin-de-siecle neurotics who established self-conscious...
PUMP CLOSED Series: 3/5
As demolition begins this spring on the Gaseteria filling station at the corner of Lafayette and Houston streets, the presence of a conspicuous New York brand will be diminished. This scruffy property, along with twenty-four other Gaseterias in the city,...
Reality Theatre
Could be Melikhovo, could be anywhere. The three sisters--Olga, Masha, and Irina--live with their brother, Andrei, in the provincial town where their father, a military man, was stationed, or retired, before he died, far from the family's former glory...
STORE TO STORE Series: 4/5
Kate Karcher Clark, president and founder of the seven-year-old Yottoy Productions, and Peter Doodeheefver, vice-president and creative director of same, set out one recent morning to sell their wares to toy stores, lugging a twenty-pound royal-blue...
Teen Spirit
In the late nineteen-eighties, I was sent to Stuyvesant High School, in Manhattan, a magnet school specializing in math and the sciences that was also a kind of holding pen for multinational nerds. The majority of us were immigrants or the children of...
The Power and the Pop
The British group Supergrass, which just released its fourth album, "Life on Other Planets" (Island), has been something of a puzzle since its second record, "In It for the Money," in 1997. Every bit the equal of the band's superb debut, "I Should Coco,"...
The Unloved American
On the Fourth of July in 1889, Rudyard Kipling found himself near Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone with a party of tourists from New England. He winced as a "clergyman rose up and told them they were the greatest, freest, sublimest, most chivalrous,...
THE WAGES OF WAR Series: 5/5
On April 18, 1942, sixteen American bombers under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Jimmy Doolittle took off from the aircraft carrier Hornet and flew six hundred miles to bomb Tokyo. The bombers did little damage, and all but one of them were forced...
WAGING PEACE Series: 1/5
President Bush has now taken to suggesting that a war to get rid of Saddam Hussein be thought of as analogous to the Second World War. Last week, the President spoke in utopian terms of the aftermath of such a war, for which he is openly impatient. Never...
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