The New Yorker

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 23, 2005

A
947 Columbus Ave. (212-531-1643)--A is just above 106th Street, in a neighborhood whose trendier residents have taken to calling it SoHa (south of Harlem). Although the restaurant's name is derived from the A train--its logo is painted on a circular...
Briefly Noted
Until I Find You, by John Irving (Random House; $27.95). Irving's vast novel recounts the life of an actor as he tries to find the father who abandoned him and to come to terms with the traumas of his youth: a mother who was an itinerant tattoo artist...
CROSSTOWN BUS; DEPT. OF SMALL TALK Series: 4/5
Among the passengers the other afternoon on the Ninety-sixth Street crosstown bus was a young black man in bluejeans and a white T-shirt. He wore a black brimmed hat, with earflaps that were pulled down over his ears, despite the heat. He was thin to...
DEAR DIARIST; INK Series: 2/5
Ned Rorem, the composer and author of scandalous diaries, summers on Nantucket, but he ventured into town the other day to give a reading, in connection with the publication of his selected letters. Two days later, retreating from a steamy afternoon...
DISK AVERSE; THE FINANCIAL PAGE Series: 5/5
In 1918, the movie business found itself in crisis. Moviegoers, who, increasingly, were more educated and more middle-class, had been growing bored with the crude, melodramatic shorts of the day. "Neither the producers nor the theatres are making money,...
LET'S GO: LIBEL; THE BENCH Series: 3/5
When the first plane crashed into the World Trade Center, Rachel Ehrenfeld was sitting at her desk in her apartment in midtown. "I was on the phone with my editor in Brussels, finishing an op-ed about terror financing for the European edition of the...
Loners; the Current Cinema
Bill Murray has strong cheekbones, a lordly crest of hair, and thin lips that he presses together in an act that suggests self-containment more than disapproval. In Jim Jarmusch's new "Broken Flowers," as in "Rushmore" and the recent "Lost in Translation,"...
Minority Retort; Annals of Politics
About twenty minutes before President Bush announced that John G. Roberts, Jr., was his choice to replace Sandra Day O'Connor on the Supreme Court, he telephoned Harry Reid, of Nevada, the Senate Minority Leader. As Reid recalls the brief conversation,...
Missionary; a Critic at Large
Edmund Wilson disliked being called a critic. He thought of himself as a journalist, and nearly all his work was done for commercial magazines, principally Vanity Fair, in the nineteen-twenties; The New Republic, in the nineteen-twenties and thirties;...
My Bird Problem; Reflections
February in South Texas: I'd checked into a roadside motel in Brownsville and was getting up in the dark every morning, making coffee for my friend Manley, who wouldn't talk to me or leave his bed until he'd had some, and then bolting the motel's free...
Mystery Theatre; Dancing
Right now, New York's "downtown" dance shows no engulfing trends, as it did in the nineteen-sixties and seventies (conceptualism and politics), or in the eighties and nineties (irony and politics). Nevertheless, there is a busy little nest of choreographers...
NAME CALLING; COMMENT Series: 1/5
You had to be a careful reader of the inside pages of the Times last week to notice that America is no longer fighting the global war on terrorism. The Administration has replaced, or revised, or expanded the G.W.O.T. with a new phrase: "a global struggle...
New York Grand Opera; Bargemusic; Amy X Neuberg / Emily Bezar; Summergarden; Mostly Mozart Festival; Cooperstown Chamber Music Festival; Bridgehampton Chamber Music Festival; Tanglewood; Bard Summerscape; Glimmerglass Opera; Caramoor Festival; Marlboro Festival; Music Mountain; Norfolk Chamber Music Festival; Maverick Concerts
Vincent La Selva, a veteran conductor with a natural command of Italianate style, continues his thirty-two-year tradition of free opera in Central Park, leading his feisty company in a staged production of Puccini's "Turandot," with Luciana LaMonico,...
Primal Ear; Books
On August 22, 1957, Pete Rademacher fought Floyd Patterson in Seattle for the world heavyweight championship. In the stands that day were two boxing fans from the English Department of the University of Washington: Theodore Roethke, a forty-nine-year-old...
Telling Stories; the Art World
Winslow Homer's first oil painting, which he made in 1863, when he was a twenty-six-year-old freelancer illustrating Civil War scenes for Harper's Weekly, shows a Union sharpshooter in a tree, balancing a rifle for an imminent shot. The man's perch is...
The Dawn Patrol; Annals of Communications
Katie Couric still finds it surprising when people come up to her and say things like "You're in my bedroom every morning." But Couric, the co-anchor of NBC's "Today" show, understands the impulse. "People have a very personal relationship with us,"...
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