Economic Inquiry

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 4, October

2012 Editor's Report
On July 1st of 2012, I became editor of Economic Inquiry. I inherited a very strong program from my predecessor, Preston McAfee who introduced a number of innovations, which I largely have kept intact. Preston has worked closely with me to ensure a...
A Clear and Present Minority: Heterogeneity in the Source of Endowments and the Provision of Public Goods
I. INTRODUCTION There is extensive evidence that heterogeneous populations invest less in social capital. For example, Alesina and Ferrara (2000) find that participation in social activities is lower in racially and ethnically diverse areas. This...
An Examination of Linear and Nonlinear Causal Relationships between Commodity Prices and U.S. Inflation
I. INTRODUCTION There is considerable literature on the use of commodity price information (particularly oil prices) in predicting economic activity and inflation. This, in large part, reflects the view that higher commodity prices, such as oil...
Endogenous Timing in Contests with Delegation
I. INTRODUCTION Contests with delegation, where each player hires a delegate to expend effort or resources on the player's behalf to win a prize, are common. (1) An example is litigation between a plaintiff and a defendant in which each litigant...
Exchange Rate Regimes and Fiscal Discipline: The Role of Capital Controls
I. INTRODUCTION The influence of exchange rate regimes (ERRs) on fiscal discipline has long been debated in both academic environments and policy makers' circles. The theoretical literature discusses the influence of ERRs on fiscal discipline exploiting...
Fiscal Decentralization and Economic Growth: Spending versus Revenue Decentralization
I. INTRODUCTION Fiscal decentralization (hereafter: FD) is a political economy trend in both developing and developed countries. According to the World Bank (1999), some 95% of democracies now have elected subnational governments, and countries...
Inefficiency as a Strategic Device in Group Contests against Dominant Opponents
I. INTRODUCTION Many strategic situations in economics and politics can be understood as contests: R&D races, oligopolistic competition, military conflicts, lobbying, etc. In most cases, it is not individuals who compete against each other but...
International Supply Chains and the Volatility of Trade
I. INTRODUCTION The 2007-2009 recession (the "Great Recession") led to a significant collapse in trade. In terms of goods trade share of gross domestic product (GDP), this decline undid U.S. trade expansion of the 2000s in less than 2 years. Once...
Is Physical Investment the Key to China's Growth Miracle?
I. INTRODUCTION Unprecedented high rates of economic growth in China over the past decades have stimulated a wide interest among researchers and policymakers in establishing whether rapid physical capital accumulation is the main driving force behind...
Leadership by Example in the Weak-Link Game
I. INTRODUCTION The weak-link game was first introduced by Hirshleifer (1983) as a stylized way to capture the private provision of many public goods. As an illustration, Hirshleifer tells the story of Anarchia, a low lying island protected from...
Persistence of Politicians and Firms' Innovation
I. INTRODUCTION In many circumstances, the coexistence of long-lived economic and political elites is blamed for countries' low rate of technological innovation and economic growth. Through long-lasting personal relations, contacts, and acquaintances...
The Habit of Giving
I. INTRODUCTION Habit formation is thought to exert great influence on behavior. It has been proffered as a potential answer to questions as disparate as the size of the equity premium (Abel 1990), optimal purchases of insurance (Ben-Arab, Briys,...
The Role of Monitoring of Corruption in a Simple Endogenous Growth Model
I. INTRODUCTION During the last 30 years, economists from various fields have contributed to the analysis of corruption. The first paper to receive widespread attention was published in 1975 (Rose-Ackerman 1975). Since then a large literature has...
War of Attrition: Evidence from a Laboratory Experiment on Market Exit
I. INTRODUCTION Young industries often undergo a process of shakeout (Gort and Klepper 1982 and Klepper 1996), attracting excess firms and gradually shedding them over time. More mature industries are likewise often forced to contract in the face...
What's So Funny about Making Monetary Policy?
I. INTRODUCTION In the United States, decisions about monetary policy are made during meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). Only the members of the FOMC and a small number of other people are allowed to attend these meetings, but...
Why Do People Use Debit Cards: Evidence from Checking Accounts
I. INTRODUCTION Debit card use has grown faster than any other payment instrument in the United States. A minor segment of the market used debit cards in 1998. However, Figure 1 shows that because of rapid growth in their use, more transactions...
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.