Management Today

Articles from October

A Hard Look at Software
As computer prices plunge and desktop PCs proliferate, customers often ask why software costs have not fallen in line with hardware. Graham Taylor, software business development manager at ICL, explains how software pricing it changing Every couple...
All over Europe Belts Are Being Tightened and Benefits Reined In
EC countries prepare to do battle over welfare bills and labour costs. Peter Wilsher Contrary to popular belief, Britian is far from being the only single market country that worries about its soaring welfare bills. All over Europe governments...
A Step-by-Step Return to Reality
David Morton offers an easy-to-follow, face-saving plan for the times when those expert guidelines to erotic personal or exotic personal practices don't live up to their promise Next to sex manuals it is probable that books teaching management techniques...
Best Factories Are Better Still ... and Now for Better Service
Entrants and awards have risen in the quest to find and reward Britain's 1993 Best Factories The annual quest by Management Today in association with Cranfield School of Management to find and reward the UK's best factories has aroused increased...
Be Wary of New Waves
Behind the new facilitate-and-empower facade of many companies, the realities of the old philosophy of command-and-control lie concealed. During the 1980s a new wave of management thinking developed which questioned much of the received wisdom -...
British Water Makes Waves Overseas
It used to be a parochial industry, but now British water thinks globally -- and is taking risks. Its initiative is not just driven by business nous but by a wish to esacpe the regulators. Men (and a few women) from the once wholly-parochial British...
De la Rue Strikes a New Note
The 180-year-old security printer is cashing in on the changed world order and on the ever-increasing automation of money handling. Democracy brings with it a wealth of paperwork. New countries need new currencies, new citizens need new passports,...
Making the Best of War and Peace
Britain's is the UK's oldest, best-known maker of toy soldiers; it also caters for 'adult-imitative' fashions in farming and offices. Charles Darwent reports on the responsiveness that it takes to be big in the little people's market 'You know...
Privatisation Goes off the Rails
Roger Eglin reports on the progress of the unpopular policy of treating BR apart As consumers reap the benefits of privatisation from more efficient public utilities, it is easy to forget the battles that punctuated progress towards the early privatisations...
Public Spending and Tax Are in for Tough Treatment
The Budget should hold few surprises given the state of public finances. Since becoming Chancellor of the Exchequer in May, Kenneth Clarke has played the straightest of orthodox bats on his plans for his first Budget. True, he has abolished the...
Sir Duncan Nichol
Part tycoon, part mandarin -- the departing NHS chief has shown steeliness and an ability to take knocks in the recent shake-up. Ask Sir Duncan Nichol, Bradford-born chief executive of the National Health Service and a lifelong civil servant, if...
Suitable Cases for Development
Employers claim that the education system does not supply the material for an effective workforce. NVQ courses provide the solution, says John Hillier As I grapple with the financial intricacies I need to master to gain my level 5 National Vocational...
The Bulldog Breed
What kind of a man is it who, suffering from headaches, stomach pains, or a bad night-the lot it appears of a majority of British managers-goes to work where he is more than likely overburdened, and returns home (taking work with him), where he has...
The Disaster Business
Computer failure is not the only company nightmare. Bombs have brought a new view of risk - and a windfall for some. Michael Warner won't forget 24 April in a hurry. It was his 46th birthday. It was also the day that he and 24 colleagues at chartered...
The Mixed-Up Manager
If you are overtired, overworked, having problems at home but blissfully happy in your work then you are probably a British manager. Though few managers in 1993 can regard either their current jobs or career strategies as 100% safe, they keep repeating...
The Rover Route to Computing
MANAGING IT The first of a series on the strategies being adopted by organisations in different industries to maximise the benefits of their investment in IT, focuses on Rover's multi-faceted manufacturing business. Guy Hains has always liked building...
The Vogue for Looking Good
Companies are now realising that their interests may not be best served by aiming solely at bottom-line profits and shareholder returns. 'Niceness' can bring long-term benefits. A couple of years ago, things were looking pretty grim for Dixons the...
To Break Up or to Build Up; When Management Is Awful, Fragmentation like Centralisation Is No Solution
When management is awful, fragmentation like centralising is no solution. Few management issues are clear-cut. But one fundamental matter shouldn't be at all ambiguous. Either scale has economies, or it hasn't. Believers in the bigger-is-better...
Where Sick Parrots Come Home to Roost
Graham Kelly, immaculate in a black tuxedo, steps forward to the front of the stage, his glasses glinting in the spotlight, his face fixed in a grin. In his left hand he clutches a small brass trophy, in his right a sheaf of notes. Before and below...
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