Management Today

Articles from February

Cutting Room: The Unstoppable Power of English; How Obsolete Notes Are a Nice Little Earner for Central Banks; on the Agenda Again -- the Exchange Rate. Evan Davis at Large
Now that the single currency is upon us, what other schemes are afoot to enhance European integration? How about a single language across the European continent? How irritating it is to be confronted with people who don't understand you, even if they...
E-Mail from the Valley
Downward mobility: I finally understood the meaning when I advertised for a personal assistant on an online San Francisco bulletin board and received an application from the CEO of a new-media start-up who said he was experiencing 'cashflow issues'....
In My Opinion: Institute of Management Companion Val Hammond, CEO of Roffey Park Institute, Argues That Leaders Must Learn to Inspire with Verve and Style
A visitor from another planet scanning our newspapers and screens would quickly come to the view that we are in deadliest peril. Maybe we are. Never have we had so much access to news of disasters both natural and man-made. We have live coverage of...
More Than One School of Thought. (Editorial)
Business and education, earning and learning, have traditionally been uneasy pairs of bedfellows in the UK. Whereas the Americans -- and even the French -- founded their first business colleges well over 100 years ago, in Britain the business school...
Playing the Field. (Building to Last)
DILEMMA: I've been trying to find the ideal business partner for ages, with no luck It's damned lonely running the business on my own -- I need someone to bounce ideas off. How can I find the right person? ISSUES: What's the real problem? Are you...
Pushing the Envelope. (Techknow)
WINDFARMS Windmills aren't everyone's idea of hi-tech but, thanks to new government initiatives on renewable power, the breeze is back in their sails again for the first time since the industrial revolution. If energy minister Brian Wilson has his...
Removing Creative Blocks. (Brain Food)
Have a clear objective. Trying to be creative without one won't get you very far. Don't evaluate your ideas immediately. Write them all down, even if you think they're no good, and select the best at the end. Remember there is no risk in coming...
Sir Christopher Frayling. (the Andrew Davidson Interview)
Design Council chairman and rector of the Royal College of Art, inveterate committee-sitter, writer, TV presenter and pundit on popular culture -- he's full of zestful geniality. What's he running from? Sir Christopher Frayling has to be dragged...
Speak for Yourself. (Vital Signs)
Do they mean me? Those introductions from the conference ring-master make one sound so extraordinarily interesting. They also mean that in about 20 seconds you've got to enter stage-left and walk impressively to the lectern or, worse, stumble from...
Starting Up When Things Are Turning Down: Dorling Kindersley, Tie Rack and CityFlyer Express Were All Born in a Recession. Would You Be Able to Spot New Opportunities Glinting through the Gloom? Catherine Monk Investigates. (Coming Up Fast)
From the slump following the 1929 crash, through the three-day week and power cuts of the early '70s to the jolts of the Thatcherite '80s, recessions come and recessions go. Downturn means battening down the hatches and forgetting about any thoughts...
The Prophets of Doom
From Cassandra's doom-laden predictions to sceptical stock market watchers, the forecasters of gloom have long been treated with derision and cast out into the wilderness. Now that those who throughout the 1990s predicted a downturn have been proved...
Too Busy for a Boozy Lunch: Arthur Klebanoff May Be a Successful and Dynamic Literary Agent, but His Story Lacks the Spice of Dealmaking Gossip. (Books)
Literary agency has to be as near to perfection as any business model can be. Your start-up costs are negligible: a telephone and PC are the bare necessities, and a small office in New York or London, the twin suns around which the publishing industry...
Toying with Our Emotions. (Motor Mouth)
Koala bears are vicious, bad-tempered little bastards, but there is something in their morphology -- the big eyes, the pudgy fluffiness, the muted colourways -- that we instinctively find agreeable. The koala design bypasses rationality to punch the...
Wanting It All
If one believes the press, new battle lines at work are being drawn up. Not between employer and employee, men and women, but between parents and the child-free. People without children are losing out on all fronts: not only do they not qualify for...
Weak at the Top. (John Weak's Diary)
MONDAY Sir Marcus has just heard about Thought Leadership and now wants someone to come up with a thought for him to lead with. The only thought we're interested in is survival after our spectacular downsizing. Sir Marcus included P45s in random...
What Did Business School Do for Them?
MTasked a batch of successful business leaders who have fulfilled many of their career ambitions whether the effort of getting their MBA qualifications had paid off. For most of them it had been tough (but fun), had boosted their confidence and put...
Whitehall Handicap
They're off... The search for a successor to civil service supremo Sir Richard Wilson is becoming urgent but, with no clear-cut favourite and the possibility that the job could be split up, it's a race of many uncertainities. David Walker studies the...
Who Needs a Consultant? (Crash Course)
Difficult challenges are looming for your business, and you don't feel you have the know-how in-house to tackle them. Time to call in the management consultants? THINK AGAIN. Are management consultants right for the task? Colin Barrow, head of the...
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