Editor & Publisher

Articles from Vol. 124, No. 6, February 9

AI Makes Another Run at Newspapers: Researchers Hope Persistence and Partnership Will Pay Off
Al makes another run at newspapers Marvin Berlin and Mike Stock once again are looking to the newspaper industry as a possible market for artificial intelligence technology. This time they come with products at hand and the support of a powerful...
Apartment Dwellers Feud over Relocation Expenses
Apartment dwellers feud over relocation expenses Apartment dwellers in the path of the Orange County Register's $39 million expansion plan are battling the newspaper over the amount of their relocation expenses. About 200 of the protestors demonstrated...
Boycott despite Apology
Boycott despite apology Auto dealers pull ads from Utah dealer because they dislike tone of a feature on how to bargain when buying a car Local automobile dealers have hit a Utah newspaper with an advertising boycott after it published an Associated...
Candid Talk: Newspaper Ad Execs Admit It Will Be a Tough Year; Discuss Ways to Cope
Candid talk Newspaper ad execs admit it will be a tough year; discuss ways to cope Attendees of the 146th sales conference of the International Newspaper Advertising and Marketing Executives were uncharacteristically candid about the state of business...
Colombian Journalist Finally Gets Visa
Colombian journalist finally gets visa More than four years since she was denied entry to the United States, Colombian journalist Patricia Lara Salive has been granted a general visitor's visa. Lara's visa was granted by the State Department in...
Ex-News Hawkers Return to the Streets: 'Newsboys' Ranging in Age from 60 to 80 Sell the Portland Oregonian's Persian Gulf Extra Edition on Street Corners
Ex-news hawkers return to the streets When war broke out in the Persian Gulf Portlanders heard the almost forgotten cry of "Extra, Extra!" on downtown streets. The cry was no more nostalgic than the Oregonian "newsboys" who were uttering it. ...
Heightened Sensitivity: SPJ Survey Shows News Media Are Getting More Sensitive to the Privacy Concerns of Their Audiences
Heightened sensitivity SPJ survey shows news media are getting more sensitive to the privacy concerns of their audiences The news media are getting more sensitive to the privacy concerns of their audiences, according to a new survey from the Society...
Museum of Cartoon Art Is Heading South
Museum of Cartoon Art is heading south The Museum of Cartoon Art's board of directors has approved a move from New York to much larger quarters in Florida. The new Boca Raton facility will be 30,000 square feet - about six times bigger than the...
Newspapers as Enforcers of Civil Rights: Federal Court Ruling Says Newspapers Can Be Held Responsible for Running Ads That Violate Fair Housing Laws
Newspapers as enforcers of civil rights A New York federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that newspapers can be held responsible for running ads that violate the U.S. Fair Housing Act, raising questions about whether newspapers will be required...
N.Y. Daily News Posted $114 Million Loss in 1990: Operating Profits Also Declined at Other Tribune Co. Newspapers
N.Y. Daily News posted $114 million loss in 1990 Losses at Tribune Co.'s strike-bound New York Daily News soared last year to $114 million, from $2 million in 1989. The strike, begun Oct. 25 by nine unions capped the worst year in the News' 71-year...
N.Y. Tines Takes Hard Line in Contract Talks
N.Y. Times takes hard line in contract talks The New York Times has threatened to leave idle its new Edison, N.J., plant - one of the biggest and most automated of its kind - unless seven unions first concede "substantial" cost reductions. Times...
Rentschler Chicago Weekly Chain Folds
Rentschler Chicago weekly chain folds William H. Rentschler went out of the newspaper business with the folding Jan. 30 of his News/Voice weeklies in suburban Chicago. In an article published as a wrap-around of the final issue, Rentschler said...
Scripps Puts Millions More into Denver
Scripps puts millions more into Denver In expanding and reordering its modernization in Denver, the E.W. Scripps Co. added $34 million to the $100 million it had already allocated for the Rocky Mountain News' new, No. Washington St. production and...
Shreveport JOA to End: But Closing Journal's Editorial Page Will Continue in Surviving Paper
Shreveport JOA to end With the termination of the Shreveport, La., newspapers' joint operating agreement, the 96-year-old Shreveport Journal will close March 31. In an unusual arrangement, the afternoon paper's editorial page will continue to appear...
Sportswriters' Dilemma
Sportswriters' dilemma Barring Pete Rose from the Hall of Fame ballot angers baseball writers and leaves them unsure about their course of action The Baseball Hall of Fame's decision to effectively bar Pete Rose from the Cooperstown, N.Y., shrine...
The Government and British Newspapers: Tabloid 'Excesses' Raise the Specter of Government Regulation
The government and British newspapers Widespread impatience in Britain with the excesses of the tabloid press has raised the specter of government regulation of newspapers. On Jan. 1, 1991, Britain's newspaper publishers launched the Press Complaints...
Those Copydesk Debates
Those copydesk debates Not long after President Nixon went to China in early '70s to pave the way for an invasion by the forces of Pizza Hut, a copy editor on the newspaper I was working for at the time committed a horrendous error. In a deadline,...
Tracking Iraqi Disinformation: It's the U.S. Information Agency's Job to Counter It
Tracking Iraqi disinformation Iraq is fighting this war not only on the battlefield and in the air but also in the media through a calculated disinformation campaign, according to a U.S. official whose job it is to track Iraqi claims in media around...
Trouble among the Press Ranks: News Organizations Blame Each Other for Some of the Problems with the Press Pools in the Persian Gulf
Trouble among the press ranks Newspaper press pools in the Persian Gulf are finding some of their harshest critics not among the military, but rather among news organizations who say they have been shut out of the pools by their competitors. Agence-France...
TV Alcohol Ad Restrictions Defeated: Northwest Newspapers Team Up with Tv, Brewers to Help Kill Proposal
TV alcohol ad restrictions defeated Although newspaper advertising was not threatened, Northwest newspapers joined broadcasters and the liquor industry in helping to kill a proposal that would have imposed tough restrictions on tv commercials of alcoholic...
Under Siege from Subpoenas
Under siege from subpoenas The U.S. news media are "under siege" from subpoenas, both those that are merely a nuisance and those that threaten reporters' privilege. While the impression is that the number of subpoenas being served has been increasing,...
War Coverage: Newspaper Editors Are Divided on the Amount of War Coverage Readers Should Receive
War coverage U.S. newspaper editors are divided on the amount of war coverage they should give their readers. Some editors say readers are showing an almost insatiable appetite for news of the Gulf war, and some newspapers have devoted as much...
Wire Guild Members to Vote on Proposed UPI Pay Cuts
Wire Guild members to vote on proposed UPI pay cuts The Wire Service Guild has agreed to put before its members at United Press International a vote to extend pay cuts for another three months. The 35% cuts, which were agreed to in November and...
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