Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 6, February

A History of the Whitney Independent Study Program
In memory of Joe Bishop, ISP 1976-77 I'd like to think this essay has been written at the suggestion of Thomas Crow, who singled out the Whitney Museum of American Art's Independent Study Program in his examination of the "new art history" in the...
Aleksandra Mir: Swiss Institute
Naming Tokyo, 2003-, the most recent product of Aleksandra Mir's ever-growing conceptual cottage industry, demonstrates both the artist's numerous strengths and her particular limitations. The piece seen here is the second part of a project originally...
Anne Chu: 303 Gallery
Amid the sea of slick objects in West Chelsea, Anne Chu's larger-than-life puppet sculptures come across as shockingly raw and old-fashioned. But craftsmen of the past would never have constructed objects in this way, leaving things slightly unfinished...
Annika Von Hausswolff: IASPIS Gallery
Annika von Hausswolff's exhibition "The Memory of My Mother's Underwear Transformed into a Flameproof Drape & Other Works," part of a series of presentations of work by Swedish artists who have shown abroad with funding from IASPIS, referred to...
Artist Curates: DIY
Although many artists can be said to contemplate mortality in their work--usually in a veiled, Robert Frost kind of way--a clearheaded few have cut through the allusive haze and made their contemplation plain. Whether natural selection, mercy killing,...
Blame It on Brio: Gary Indiana on Leni Riefenstahl
NOW THAT SHE IS authentically dead--at 101, felled by a curse from the ghost of Ernst Junger, who lived two years longer--Leni Riefenstahl has joined the shades she often conjured during a career of ardor, mystification, and, perhaps, subliminal expiation....
Bradley McCallum and Jacqueline Tarry: Conner Contemporary Art
Since the early '90s, artists Bradley McCallum and Jacqueline Tarry have consistently engaged issues such as racism, police brutality, and homelessness, interviewing and interacting with some of its victims through a variety of mediums, including photography,...
"Carne Viva": Museo De Arte del Centro Cultural De San Marcos
There are instances when life manages to imitate art without recycling cliches, and this exhibition was a fine example. Last August, the Peruvian Truth and Reconciliation Commission released its report on the tragic results of two decades of political...
Cerith Wyn Evans: White Cube
A white neon sign on the facade of White Cube read "slow fade to black." The gallery name, one imagines, marks an ironic acknowledgment of Brian O'Doherty's paradigmatic art space. But Cerith Wyn Evans's cinematic instruction tlips the expectations...
Charles Sandison: Galerie Frank
The gallery is plunged in darkness; words in motion float on the walls. The simple characters and the mostly white-on-black projection immediately evoke the computer, but at a rudimentary stage, far from the latest innovations of digital imaging; Charles...
Cody Choi: PKM Gallery
When Cody Choi moved from Seoul to Los Angeles at age twenty-two, he experienced a particularly painful and protracted form of homesickness: Speaking poor English and ill at ease in the radically different social milieu, the artist suffered from frequent...
Conserving Habitats: Kevin Pratt on Green Design
IF HISTORICAL ANALOGIES offer any guidance, green design will emerge as the modernism of the new century. There is more than a passing similarity between recent eclecticism in architecture and the stylistic free-for-all that characterized the early...
Dan Fischer: Derek Eller Gallery
Dan Fischer's art of homage and appropriation reveals its maker as both passionate fan and savvy practitioner. Well-known photographs of artists and artworks are the originals for Fischer's detailed graphite-on-paper copies; his recent show included...
Emily Jacir
On the wall of Emily Jacir's studio in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn is a photograph roughly torn from a newspaper. Dominating the frame is a billboard featuring two men on horses, the text saying, simply, "Marlboro." Below the billboard are...
Eugenia Butler: Ben Maltz Gallery, Otis College of Art & Design
An artist who operated in the same late-'60s circles as Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner and whose work was included in early exhibitions of Conceptual and post-Minimalist art such as "Electric Art" at UCLA (1969),...
Flesh & Blood: Sex and Violence in Recent French Cinema
THE CONVULSIVE VIOLENCE OF BRUNO DUMONT'S NEW FILM Twentynine Palms (2003)--a truck ramming and a savage male rape, a descent into madness followed by a frenzied knifing and suicide, all crammed into the movie's last half hour after a long, somnolent...
From Noise to Beuys: Bennett Simpson on Art and Pop Music
DO YOU WANT NEW WAVE, or do you want the truth? So asked the punk band Minutemen in 1984--and the verdict is still out, especially in art. The prominence of pop music in recent art, from rock and punk to noise, techno, and hip-hop, is one of the most...
Gabriele Di Matteo: Antonio Colombo Arte Contemporanea
Gabriele Di Matteo's work is based on quotation--and not only from the world of art. His recent exhibition was a true apotheosis of citation (and self-citation). The artist, principally a painter, also experiments with other media, and on this occasion...
Graham Gillmore: Kenny Schachter Contemporary
Graham Gillmore's current work seems to come in two visually distinct types. First, there are those paintings made up of casually modeled words and phrases linked by an intestine-like labyrinth of thought bubbles; these red and blue lines elaborate...
Gregor Schneider: Barbara Gladstone Gallery
"517 W. 24th," Gregor Schneider's first solo show in New York, was noteworthy not least because self-contained installations are unusual in his oeuvre. The German artist's lifework is the Haus u r (ur-house), 1985-, an outwardly unassuming building...
Hans Schabus: Bonner Kunstverein
As a child, I was fascinated by the idea of experiencing the interior of my own body, my imagination fired by children's books about tiny people who wander through the human anatomy and view the individual organs from within. When I saw Hans Schabus's...
Heir Unapparent: Gregory Williams on Roger M. Buergel
AMID ALL THE FRENZIED speculation surrounding the selection of the next Documenta curator, Roger M. Buergel probably didn't top many lists of potential candidates. Although known and respected throughout much of the German-speaking art world, he only...
Howard Hodgkin: Gagosian Gallery
Do Howard Hodgkin's new paintings reprise what physiologist Max Verworn in 1908 called "ideoplastic style"--pure painterly expression or representation of interiority--or do they extend and develop the aesthetic perception at the core of this style?...
Ingrid Calame: James Cohan Gallery
Everyone who follows contemporary painting knows the peculiar method by which Ingrid Calame makes her work--for others, let it be said that it has to do with transcribing stains found on city streets and sidewalks, then overlapping the resulting forms--but...
Jack Pierson: Cheim & Read
Jack Pierson's latest exhibition comprised three installation spaces, each captioned with a new signage work. Mismatched gold letters (with a white neon T to start) spell out TO YOUTH (all works 2003), both homage and indicator of loss. This hung adjacent...
James Turrell: PaceWildenstein, New York
Since 1966, when he transformed his Santa Monica studio into an artwork by meticulously arranging natural and artificial light sources, James Turrell has made works composed almost exclusively of light cast on, around, and into architectural spaces:...
Joao Onofre: Centro Galego De Arte Contemporanea
One hears a noise of unknown origin and, after a few disturbing moments, sees a vulture burst into a room. The surprise is terrible--and it is no trick. What was going through Portuguese artist Joao Onofre's head when he decided to bring about such...
Jorge Pardo: Gagosian Gallery
In his first exhibition at this gallery, Jorge Pardo could be said to "deliver" without ever ceasing to hold back. First, there is the requisite upping of the ante, perfectly in keeping with the heightened expectations that come with this new territory,...
Kori Newkirk
The work of Los Angeles--based artist Kori Newkirk can be seen in solo shows at the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia (through mid-February) and the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (opening February 27). [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 1 SKID...
Marc Camille Chaimowicz: Talks about Jean Cocteau, 2003
After moving from his native Paris as a boy, Marc Camille Chaimowicz spent the remainder of his youth in the somewhat less exciting surroundings of English new-town suburbia, before going on to art school. His family's move, coming as it did in the...
Marko Lehanka: Carlier / Gebauer
Although Marko Lehanka considers himself a sculptor, many of his early works were computer based, and in the early '90s he participated in exhibitions with a new-media focus. Yet you'd never suspect such beginnings from his exhibition "Schone Gru[beta]...
Michael Joo: Mit List Visual Arts Center
Since 1991, Michael Joo has used materials such as urine, natural and synthetic sweat and salt, sprouting seeds, live and dead deer, and transparent plastic deities to explore themes of transformation, evolution, and shamanism in his drawings, sculptures,...
Nancy Spero: Galerie Lelong
The timely resurrection of Nancy Spero's passtonate antiwar imagery--produced nearly four decades ago against the backdrop of the conflict in Vietnam--seemed a thinly veiled reminder that history repeats itself. To view Spero's "War Series 1966-70"...
Raoul De Keyser: David Zwirner
Unearthing fragments of a ten-year-old linocut in his studio, septuagenarian Belgian artist Raoul De Keyser decided to use them as a jumping-off point for a series of modest paintings in which he calmly but with insistence reassesses the lingering...
Rosalind Nashashibi: Temple Bar Gallery
For Rosalind Nashashibi a short film lasts a little over three minutes, a long one less than twelve. Shot with a windup 16 mm Bolex camera and subsequently transferred to DVD, her films share a measured rhythm that is due less to the shifting pace...
Ryan Gander: STORE
Ryan Gander seems to be something of a tease. His installation But it was all green, 2003, camouflaged STORE's exterior windows by covering them with the type of reflective, translucent black plastic sheeting that usually connotes "sex shop." The near-empty...
Steven Gontarski: Karyn Lovegrove Gallery
Hey kids, remember Gaetan Dugas? [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Canadian airline steward. Introduced AIDS into North America. Aka "Patient Zero." The deadly nightshade of such fiction, produced to rationalize and naturalize the world's terror, darkens...
Surface Tensions: Judith Butler on Diane Arbus
The Diane Arbus exhibition "Revelations," currently showing at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, is not difficult to attend. The crowds that circled the block to see the major Marc Chagall exhibition earlier this fall are now quite small, leading...
Talk of the Gown: Bob Nickas on Leigh Bowery
"IT WAS A BIT LIKE GOING to the zoo and watching Guy the Gorilla in drag." That's how Cerith Wyn Evans recalls Leigh Bowery's weeklong London performance at Anthony d'Offay Gallery in 1988. Bowery, each day in a different costume of his own design,...
The Eyes Have It: Gillian Wearing on Diane Arbus
Gillian Wearing has always emphasized her work's affiliation with the field of documentary--for instance, with Michael Apted's sequence of films beginning with Seven Up (1964)--over its roots in fine art. But her penchant for subjecting its documentary...
"The Invisible Thread": Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, Snug Harbor Cultural Center
What makes a work of art "Buddhist"? This question is like a koan, a riddle that can only be experienced, not expressed in words. In this show about the Buddhist spirit in contemporary American art, Bill Viola's video The Reflecting Pool, 1977-79 perfectly...
"The Last Picture Show": Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
The pictures in "The Last Picture Show," a survey covering the "conceptual uses" of photography from 1960 to 1982, demonstrate an approach to the medium that contrasts sharply with the one Alfred Stieglitz and his progeny developed to attain for photography...
Thomas Kiesewetter: Jack Tilton Gallery
Blech: In English, an expression of disgust; in German, a term for high-gauge sheet metal. On view recently in his first solo show in the United States, Thomas Kiesewetter's untitled blech sculptures are all the more appealing for the baseness of their...
Transporting Visions: On the Art of Simon Starling
Simon Starling presents deceptively common objects: airplanes, lamps, chairs, plants, and cars. Altered or taken out of context, they lose their muteness, and elaborate yarns spin from them: stories linking the heroic or eccentric endeavors of individuals...
Twin Bills: Theresa Duncan on Women and the Man in Two Recent Films
AT FIRST GLANCE, Sofia Coppola's melancholy love story Lost in Translation and Quentin Tarantino's brazen splatterfest Kill Bill: Vol. 1 don't seem to have much in common beyond their similarly lavish Oscar campaigns. But then a peculiar set of coincidences...
Two on One: Richard Meyer on Robert Rauschenberg
Robert Rauschenberg: Breaking Boundaries, by Robert S. Mattison. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. 277 pages. $50. [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Random Order: Robert Rauschenberg and the Neo-Avant-Garde, by Branden W. Joseph. Cambridge, MA: MIT...
Untimely Ends: Homi K. Bhabha on Edward Said
When you think about it, when you think about Jew and Palestinian not separately, but as part of a symphony, there is something magnificently imposing about it. A very rich, also very tragic, also in many ways desperate history of extremes ... that is...
Vanessa Beecroft: Castello Di Rivoli
Three different groups of women--young, naked models; relatives of the artist and veterans of her past performances dressed in brightly colored tunics; upper-crust Turinese women dressed in tunics of a color between beige and tawny yellow--sat on glass...
VIII Bienal De Habana: Various Venues
Organized by a team of six local curators affiliated with the Centro de Arte Contemporaneo Wifredo Lam, including its director, Hilda Maria Rodriguez Enriquez, the eighth Bienal de Habana faced difficulties on several fronts--political, financial,...
Wilhelm Sasnal: Kunsthalle Zurich
Broad, densely tangled brushstrokes pile up on the surface of the canvas. They compose an impenetrable green wall that hangs threateningly over a small, scattered group of people. In Wilhelm Sasnal's Forest, 2002, painting alla prima reveals itself...
"Work Ethic": Baltimore Museum of Art
Curator Helen Molesworth's "Work Ethic" ambitiously argues for a new approach to evaluating post-World War II artistic practice. Rather than organizing contemporary art around a focus on style or content, avant-garde seccession, or medium-based investigation,...

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