Artforum International

An international contemporary art magazine covering sculpture, painting, mixed media, and installation works, as well as architecture, music, and popular culture. Includes artist interviews and reviews of individual artists and/or galleries; reviews of fi

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 3, November

A Kiss for Us
Thank you for the painting, Marisa, l've put glass over it. The painted man with the leap given him by the earth! (I've come to prefer drawing men to women, for their bodies somehow have more need to be drawn since an ideal crumbled.) Your painted...
All-Star Casts
History recalls Andrew Carnegie as a generous philanthropist trapped by provincial tastes. The intention behind his Carnegie Museum of Art, founded in Pittsburgh in 1895, was to collect "the old masters of tomorrow"; the Carnegie international began...
Andreas Siekmann
For his project, Wir fahren fur Bakunin (We're traveling for Bakunin), Andreas Siekmann plans to travel to a total of 250 cities. The first stop was Frankfurt, the second Hamburg, and recently he came to Vienna. The cities were selected in order to...
An Uncertain Hour
In the '80s, Martha Clarke, who began her career as a choreographer and founder of the group Pilobolus, stepped from the dance scene into the art world. Though the highly visual quality of her work seemed to justify moving into an art/performance context,...
Asta Groting
Though seemingly static and cold, Asta Groting's sculptures actually represent organic processes. At once massive and transparent, the digestive system of a shark constructed in Murano glass rested on the the floor. Like the glass, which was also at...
Critical Reflections
About a century ago, Auguste Rodin presaged our condition in his conversations with Paul Gsell: the "death of art" is due not to the damage inflicted on the various fields of representation by photographic "objectivity" but to a conflict of duration....
"Downtown: Arkley, Rooney, Ruscha." (Howard Arkley, Robert Rooney and Edward Ruscha, Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, Australia)
As this show demonstrated, Howard Arkley, Robert Rooney, and Edward Ruscha have been working through the paradoxical forms of the (sub)urban abyss for well over twenty years. These artists not only took the demon out of suburbia but, less obviously,...
Elliott Puckette
Wood panels covered in a sparse tracery of calligraphic lines, Elliott Puckette's works are ethereal. Her latest efforts are named for great winds, Sirocco, 1995, and Harmattan, 1995, while in another work, Hala, 1994, the thin white lines that cling...
Finnish Gilt: The Photography of Esko Mannikko
When in Helsinki last winter I came upon Esko Mannikko's antique-framed photographs of back-country Finns,[1] I wanted one. Lust to own art is infrequent but not novel for me. I have often said that, given the pelf, I would be a collector instead of...
Francisco Ruiz De Infante
For this exhibition, entitled "Los Huesos blandos" (the bland bones), Francisco Ruiz occupied the entire gallery as well as the patio that it shares with its neighbor, so that from the street entrance one proceeded directly into the artist's intervention....
Franz Ackermann
Where the hell is Franz Ackermann anyway? This is the question that inevitably arises when viewing the work of this Berlin-based artist who wanders from one geographic location or cultural situation to the next, looking for new experiences, and maybe...
Giuseppe Maraniello
Imagine constructing a vase, or a nest, from the inside out - this is what Giuseppe Maraniello did for his latest show. Using the bronze supports that are sawed off cast statues, he put together a gigantic framework - more than four meters in diameter...
Gunther Forg
Gunther Forg's photos of Moscow are very, very beautiful. This comes as no surprise vis-a-vis Forg, but is really quite astonishing vis-a-vis Moscow. In a sort of frieze comprising 31 large black and white prints, Forg represents some of the great...
Guy's in the Hood
WITH ITS PERFECTLY FUSED connotations of fabulousness and flux, the title of this collection of newspaper columns, written for The Village Voice between 1981 and 1993, magnanimously invokes New York City, worms and all. The reportorial stance here...
Jim Dow
What taxonomical photography has in common with lepidopterology, poison-frog collecting, and train spotting is that it, too, can be a means of nurturing an idiosyncratic obsession. It combines the scientism of typological investigation with the more...
Jimmy De Sana
Jimmy De Sana delineated his love of objects and the exemplary lie of photography in an interview with Diego Cortez in 1986: "A photograph is how much you want to lie, how far you want to stretch the truth about the object. And, as photography is always...
Jorge Pardo
Though the use of everyday objects has become something of a fetish in contemporary art, Jorge Pardo's most recent installation goes beyond mere fashion. As early on as the stairway leading up to the gallery, the visitor was greeted by Pardo's "benches,"...
Josef Albers
Josef Albers' photographs and his early work with glass suggest that his career might have taken another, perhaps more frutiful, turn had he not abandoned both media in favor of a somewhat didactic investigation of abstract painting. It was not only...
Katherine Sherwood
In Katherine Sherwood's newest body of work, the predominant theme is luck, examined in several of its most peculiar and intrinsically random forms. Set against a ground of paper glued onto canvas, signs and symbols of magic, gambling, and apocalypse...
Kerry James Marshall
By synthesizing Leon Golub's monumentality - the mythic quality he finds even in the basest and most brutal reality - with Robert Colescort's raucous, satirical/parodic image-crunching, Kerry James Marshall is still developing a style that, while perhaps...
Licensing to Kill
BY THE TIME A JURY of his peers declared O.J. Simpson not guilty last month, his long-running "first"(?) trial had cost California taxpayers upwards of $8.3 million while generating programming so astonishingly popular it supported several cable channels...
Lucia Nogueira
We all like to think of artmaking as in volving some kind of transformation Lucia Nogueira is an expert at making something seem like everything and nothing. She put seven separate works in the small upstairs gailery here, and three more downstairs,...
Luciano Perna
A member of the Toy Train Operating Society, Luciano Perna hung his framed certificate over a setup guaranteed to make fellow model-train enthusiasts either swoon or vomit. While most hobbyists yearns for an ordered miniature world, Perna, with the...
Me and Ms. Stone
FOLLOWING IN THE WAKE of the commercial and artistic failure of Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Gus Van Sant's new movie, To Die For, is perhaps his most conventional film, in spite of its fractured diegesis and multiple points of view; conventional,...
Monica Carocci
Monica Carocci's recent show consisted of a series of black and white photographs and the video from which this series was composed. Carocci has been lauded for the subjective expressivity of her photographic work, but her use of video as a medium...
Nancy Rubins
Nancy Rubins' ebuilient sculpture seems to drag everything along with it. In its explosive, turbulent gestures, Rubins, work can be aligned to the esthetic of the Baroque: theatrical in effect, her sprawling sculptures create a sense of vertigo. All...
Net Works
ALTHOUGH THE NET'S BEEN around since the '70s, it's still in an embryonic stage as a space for serious art. Adaweb, a new World Wide Web site geographically based in New York, represents an attempt to address the art world's byte deficit by commissioning...
Next to Nothing: The Art of Tom Friedman
Jane Bowles once wrote to her husband, her dearest Bupple, "I keep forgetting what writing is supposed to be anyway." She had already published a novel, Two Serious Ladies, which she decided "was after all not a novel." She forgot what a novel was...
Openings: Laura Owens
From Frank Stella's fat and fucked-up objets de hood to the highly caffeinated uberabstractions of artists like David Reed, Fiona Rae, and Fabian Marcaccio, ultraneurotic painting continues to make the global rounds. In a quest for true emptiness,...
Oyvind Fahlstrom
This large retrospective of Oyvind Fahlstrom's work, curated by Thomas Nordanstad and Deborah Thompson, traces the development of the idea of the artwork as a game from the early abstract canvases, to the multivalent paintings from the '60s (in which...
Patrick Zachmann
There are over 100 photographs in this exhibit and nearly 150 in the accompanying book, which bears the initially baffling title W. ou L'oeil d'un long-nez (W. or the eye of a long-nose). The scale of this show somehow befits the ostensible subject:...
Paul Myoda
In Paul Myoda's recent show, gawky, faux-rock sculptures snaked along the walls or dangled from the ceiling; one, with gaping maw, remained rooted to the floor. Cast in Styrofoam and gypsum resin with artificial stone aggregate, these varied creatures...
Paul Pagk
Paul Pagk knows the truth; you can follow the lines on his canvases straight (more or less@ to the heart of it. You know the truth, too, even if you try to forget every now and again. The truth is that the Institution permeates our existence so completely...
Paul Thek
Marcel Duchamp once said that "a picture dies after a few years like the man who painted it. Afterward its called the history of art." The process, however, is not inevitable: as Chris Dercon writes in his catalogue foreword for Paul Thek - The wonderful...
Philippe Parreno
For his recent project, Philippe Parreno asked his dealers to invite friends and acquaintances to spend all of May Day working in the gallery. The room contained various tools: projectors, a screen, an ironing board and an iron, pieces of fabric and...
"Pierced Hearts and True Love." (Tattooing, Various Artists, Drawing Center, New York)
"Pierced Hearts and True Love: A Century of Drawings for Tattoos" is a sprawling show with over a century's worth of work from more than 80 artists, including flash (readymade tattoo images), advertising, some portraits, some actual vintage - and modern...
Reality Bytes
A painter who enrolled in the Whitney Program before migrating to Columbia Film School, Kathryn Bigelow is something of an anomaly in Planet Hollywood. Combining an affinity for the frenetic rhythms of the thriller with a taste for subversive genre-bending...
Sam Samore
Fashion magazines are notorious breeding grounds for fantasy, often of the erotic sort. While it's unclear whether Sam Samore hopes to evoke this kind of eroticism in his recent series of photographs, this much seems certain: he digs female models....
Sidney Goodman
There is, of course, no such thing as realism. As Donald Kuspit recently pointed out, the hyperprecision of a painter like Philip Pearlstein is actually rooted in a fascination with abstract, reified surfaces. By contrast, Sidney Goodman's notion of...
"Site Santa Fe." (Various Artists, Site Santa Fe, Santa Fe, New Mexico)
New Mexico has always been about tourists - one way or another. It was settled by them, and kept alive economically for centuries (Spaniards, Old Mexicans, Texans, and Californians, in order of appearance). So it,s fitting, in a way, that "Site Santa...
Terry Winters
If drawing is understood as an unconsciously directed pattern of lines that eventually resolves into an evocative, peculiarly organic image, then Terry Winters is one of the masters of the medium. His drawings convey a sense of emotional conviction,...
"The Moderns." (Various Artists, Feature, New York)
A perplexing, disconcerting, very pretty thing is the body, and I have been trying to think about bodily beauty as a form of intelligence. The truism about beautiful men and women not being very smart is only interesting as comedy@ if thinking through...
The Right Buff
THIS WINTER WE'LL FIND out whether the shiny fabrics of the spring and summer are going to make it on the streets as cold-weather wear or revert to a life as traffic-safety vests. Now that the original raver futurecult has filtered its way through...
"Threshold." (Various Artists, Fundacao De Serralves, Porto, Portugal)
Without a doubt, the artistic genre that has undergone the most radical transformations in recent decades is sculpture. In the '60s and '70s, these metamorphoses were formal in nature and they contributed to what became known as the "expansion of the...
Tobi Kahn
Comprised of 16 small paintings, sculptures, and works on paper, Tobi Kahn's recent show "Dreamscapes" explored the interdependence of memories and dreams. Kahn's thickly painted, biomorphic abstractions were the most dramatic of the works shown here....
Willem De Kooning: Clam Diggers, 1964
I It might be the light over Antwerp, the Antwerp of Peter Paul Rubens. Antwerp. Ostende. The light over water and sand from any of umpteen dank-dismal skies, any of umpteen dreary-drab northern European skies. But this is the light over Long Island...
William Edmondson
"Miracles," which brought together 36 works by the sculptor William Edmondson (ca. 1882-1951), was the first solo show of this self-taught artist's work to be mounted in 20 years. A Tennessee native, Edmondson was active from approximately 1931-49;...
Win Knowlton
Since his second solo show featuring witty, Giacometti-esque floor pieces and fetishes (part of Moma's "Projects" series), Win Knowlton has played off the work of disparate artists - including Isamu Noguchi, David Smith, Eva Hesse, and Richard Serra...

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