Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 1, Winter

Adam, Eve, and the 'Tacen' in 'Genesis B.' (Old English 'Sign')
A well-known feature of the Old Saxon-Old English Genesis poem is that Adam is tempted first. Pretending to have come from God, the devil's messenger, his boda, tells Adam that God wills now to heighten his powers of mind and body as a reward for good...
Angelica's Loveknots: The Poetics of Requited Desire in 'Orlando Furioso' 19 and 23
Much critical attention has been lavished on the twenty-third canto of Orlando Furioso, and rightly so. It stands at the exact physical center of the poem, it records the onset of Orlando's madness, it chronicles the transformation of the hero from...
Charles II's "Grand Tour": Restoration Panegyric and the Rhetoric of Travel Literature
1 One of the most prominent, acrid, and in the end probably unresolvable debates prevailing among historians of seventeenth-century England concerns whether the civil wars, and the Commonwealth and Protectorate period constituted a "rebellion"...
Tennessee Williams's Theater as Body
1. CAN THEATER ESCAPE REPRESENTATION Since the inception of critical thinking on theater there has been a tendency to downplay or subordinate the role of words. Although many commentators have interpreted Aristotelian dramaturgy as fundamentally...
The Psychic Struggle of the Narrative Ego in the Conclusion of 'Troylus and Criseyde.' (Geoffrey Chaucer)
"The Chaucerian persona puzzle is a joy forever," Thomas Garbaty promised us almost twenty years ago.(1) Indeed, like Rorschach figures, Chaucer's enigmatic narrators continue to provoke critical responses that reveal more about our own epistemological...
True, Right, and Good: Blake's Arguments for Vision in 'Jerusalem.'
William Blake's poems and paintings often give the impression of self-sufficiency--contained by the visionary world, oblivious to reception by the mundane world. As artistic prophet, Blake sometimes cries, "Mark well my words! they are of your eternal...