Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 3, Summer

Erasmus and Bernard Mandeville: A Reconsideration
In Alexander Pope's Essay on Criticism (1711), the controversial Dutch Humanist Desiderius Erasmus (1466-1536) is made to symbolize the rebirth of learning following the gothic darkness of the medieval era: At length, Erasmus, that great injur'd...
Goethe, the Apostles, and Tennyson's Supposed Confessions
Ian H. C. Kennedy was the first to point out that the original title of Tennyson's Supposed Confessions of a Second-rate Sensitive Mind, which added the information that the mind was "not in union with itself," included a quotation from Carlyle's translation...
The Decorum of 'Beowulf.'
John Gardner suggested interpreting Beowulf in terms of "that commonplace of medieval thought" which identified the three qualities of the tripartite soul with the three ages of life, as in the fourteenth-century Parliament of the Three Ages, in which...
'The House of Mirth' and Edith Wharton's "Beyond!"
1 In Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, the heroine Lily Bart is prohibited from the self-invention she seeks by socially-constructed conceptions of who she must be. Lily is imprisoned in a projection of male desire, fantasized simplistically...
The Poet of Labor: Authorship and Property in the Work of Ben Jonson
I want to start by revisiting a traditional distinction between Shakespeare, the poet of nature who never blotted a line, and Jonson, who blotted so many that he became famous for slow and laborious composition. I would rediscover this distinction...

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