Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 86, No. 1-2, Spring

Alfred in the Neatherd's Cottage: History Painting and Epic Poetry in the Early Nineteenth Century
In 1766 the German dramatist and critic Gotthold Ephraim Lessing warned in his essay Laokoon against over-emphasizing apparent similarities between the arts of poetry and painting, and his views have been restated more uncompromisingly by modern critics....
Apollonius of Tyre in Its Manuscript Context: An Issue of Marriage
The romance of Apollonius of Tyre was "throughout the Middle Ages, one of the most frequently copied and translated romances of all those which are thought to have originated in the Hellenistic world of the second- and third-centuries A.D. " (1) The...
Dryden's "Ceyx and Alcyone": Metamorphosing Ovid
"Ceyx and Alcyone" is perhaps the least commented upon of all Dryden's Fables. This is not surprising in some ways because compared to other parts of the collection, such as the extensive altered passages in "Palamon and Arcite" or the greatly enlarged...
Dunbar's Broken Rainbow: Symbol, Allegory, and Apocalypse in "The Goldyn Targe"
William Dunbar's "The Goldyn Targe" adheres in most ways to late medieval dream-vision conventions, but idiosyncratically features a ship "Wyth merse of gold brycht as the stern of day, / Quhilk tendit to the land full lustily, / As falcoun swift desyrouse...
From Many Gods to One: Divine Action in Renaissance Epic
From Many Gods to One: Divine Action in Renaissance Epic by Tobias Gregory. U. of Chicago Press, 2006. Pp. 247. $30.00. The epic narrator of Paradise Lost sets out on an ambitious course of pursuing "Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhime" (1.15-16),...
Masculine Agency and Moral Stance in Shakespeare's King John
While traditionally noted for its unpopularity with critics and audiences, the supposed uniqueness of King John among Shakespeare's history plays has been reassessed over the last two decades. In 1989 Deborah Curren-Aquino proclaimed that time "may...
Outward Appearances: The Female Exterior in Restoration London
Outward Appearances: The Female Exterior in Restoration London by Will Pritchard. Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell U. Press, 2008. Pp. xii + 266. $55.00. Authenticity was perhaps one of the more contentious issues in Restoration London. If by "inauthentic"...
Rich Peasants in the Old French Fabliau
Three Old French fabliaux, "Le Vilain Mire," "Constant du Hamel," and "Boivin de Provins," reveal an uneasy fascination with a new figure in the social landscape of the thirteenth century, the rich peasant. (1) Economically bound to a rigid class structure...
"That Sublimest Juyce in Our Body": Bloodletting and Ideas of the Individual in Early Modern England
Blood always speaks beyond itself. A meeting point between the material and the vital, it is a substance suffused with meaning more than physiological. For the ancient writers of Leviticus, life itself was in the blood, and the elaborate blood rituals...
The Religious and Political Vision of Pynchon's against the Day
Since V. appeared in 1963, Thomas Pynchon has exemplified American postmodernism, and Against the Day carries on the process of undercutting our ontological assumptions and denying us the stability that would support claims of truth or authenticity....
Writers, Readers, and Reputations: Literary Life in Britain 1870-1918
Writers, Readers, and Reputations: Literary Life in Britain 1870-1918 by Philip Waller. Oxford U. Press, 2006. Pp. xii + 1181. $192.50 cloth; $60 paper. This is a massive book, 9.8 x 6.7 x 2.5 inches in dimension and weighing 5.65 pounds. Its author,...

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