Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 4, Fall

Hazlitt, Ruskin, and Ideal Form
In an essay first published in Macmillan's Magazine in March 1887, and later republished in 1890 in his Essays in English Literature 1780-1860, George Saintsbury makes what must appear to present-day commentators, a surprisingly large claim for...
Hit Seg[eth] on Halgum Bocum: The Logic of Composite Old English Homilies
The vernacular homilies can be frustrating, the flotsam of the ages coming down through sometimes battered manuscripts, corrected perhaps, but more often riddled with absurdities or error. Many are composite, assembled from multiple sources translated...
Katherine Philips: Friendship, Poetry and Neo-Platonic Thought in Seventeenth Century England
In her book on English women's poetry from the execution of Charles I to the death of Queen Anne, Carol Barash argues convincingly for a politicized reading of Katherine Philips's verse, including the friendship poetry. Referring to the establishment...
No Fixed Point: Gender and Blood Feuds in Njal's Saga
Critics have long acknowledged the destruction wrought by women in the family sagas, and have interrogated the motivations and structure of their deeds, and those of the men around them. (1) For Richard F. Allen, sagas continue and transform the...
The Composition of "Sir Patrick Spence"
The last lines of "Sir Patrick Spence" in the Percy version of this poem (1)--the whole of which I herewith produce--significantly reflect the first lines: The king sits in Dumferling toune, Drinking the blude-reid wine: O quhar will...

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