Philological Quarterly

This journal covers aspects of medieval European and modern literature and culture. The articles published incorporate physical bibliography, the sociology of knowledge, the history of reading, reception studies and other fields of inquiry.

Articles from Vol. 95, No. 3-4, Summer-Fall

Four Contemporary Translations of Dorothy Arundell's Lost English Narratives
On 6 September 1594, an anonymous letter describing the execution two months earlier of John Cornelius, SJ, a long time associate of the Arundell family of Lanherne, Cornwall, was sent out of England and eventually archived by Jesuits as, variously,...
Introduction: Beyond Babel, or, the Agency of Translators in Early Modern Literature and History
Every translation is an interpretation, both a rereading and a rewriting: translators deracinate and also resituate the works they re-language, and their actions are neither straightforward in practice nor simple to study. Even assuming a translator's...
Peri Hypsous in Translation: The Sublime in Sixteenth-Century Epic Theory
The sublime has been called the "preeminent modern aesthetic category"--a well-deserved title, as the sublime stars in multiple essay collections and single-authored volumes in the twenty-first century alone. (1) Yet scholars are only beginning to...
Platonic Words: Paolo Sarpi and Roberto Bellarmino as Translators in the Venetian Interdict Crisis
Paolo Sarpi, a Venetian priest of the Servite order, rose to international prominence during the quarrel between the Republic of Venice and Pope Paul V (r. 1605-21) at the beginning of the seventeenth century. The Republic and the pope initially disagreed...
The Greeks and the Romans: Translatio, Translation, and Parody in the Libro De Buen Amor
And therefore willingly I take his word, though wittingly I do mistake it, translata proficit. --John Florio Entiende bien mis dichos e piensa la sentencia; non me contesca con tigo commo al doctor de Grecia con el rribaldo rromano e con su poca...
"The Knots Within": Translations, Tapestries, and the Art of Reading Backwards
Leonard Digges is perhaps best known for the commendatory poem he composed for the 1623 First Folio that proclaims that Shakespeare's works will outlive the time-bound "Stratford Moniment" and make Shakespeare "looke / Fresh to all Ages." (1) In a...
The Reach of Translation in the Works of Anne Finch
The translations of Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea (1661-1720), far exceed the commonplace function of importing the foreign into the domestic; instead, Finch draws on the power of translation as a vehicle of social and political critique, in order...
Translating History and Expunging Treason: Textual and Political Intervention in the Conspiracy of the Duke of Biron
By the end of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth, translation and historiography, both anchored in a common past and a venerable practice, were inseparable from the idea of nascent statehood in early modern Europe. (1) As humanist...
Who Is Pressing You Now?: A Reconsideration of Milton's "Pyrrha Ode"
Milton's translation of Horace's Odes 1.5, the so-called "Pyrrha Ode" or ode "Ad Pyrrham," continues to inspire strong reactions: on the one hand, held up as an example of precisely how not to translate a poem; on the other, regarded as an incontestable...
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