Nutrition Health Review

Health magazine (tabloid).

Articles from No. 107, Fall

Antioxidant-Rich Vegetables, Fruits, and Grains Reduce Stroke Risk in Women
Swedish women who ate an antioxidant-rich diet had fewer strokes whether or not they had a previous history of cardiovascular disease. "Eating antioxidant-rich foods may reduce your risk of stroke by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammation,"...
Antioxidants as Defenders: An Interview with Kedar Prasad, Ph.D
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Q.: What are antioxidants? A.: Antioxidants are substances chemicals that or can destroy radicals. Q.: How do antioxidants affect the body? A.: Since our bodies use oxygen, they generate free radicals, which are associated...
Blood Test for Smokers at High Risk for Heart Disease
A simple blood test could some day determine a smoker's lung toxicity and the danger of heart disease. Nearly 20 percent (one in five) of adults in the United States smoke, and smoking-related medical expenses and loss of productivity exceed $167 billion...
Body and Mind Influence Quitting Smoking after Stroke
Whether patients give up smoking may depend on the region of the brain that was damaged by a stroke and by their intention to quit smoking before having a stroke. "We found that both biological and psychological factors may influence someone's smoking...
Delirium after Stroke Linked to Poor Patient Outcomes
Delirium, which develops in about 30 percent of patients who are hospitalized shortly after a stroke, is linked to poorer outcomes. Delirium is an acute state of confusion marked by disorientation, attention deficit, altered and fluctuating mental...
Does Fever Have a Purpose? an Interview with Christopher Vasey, N.D
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Q.: What is a fever? A.: A fever occurs when the body is fighting against an infection. The fever is the effect of the fight between the human immune system and the foreign assailant. When the body fights an infection,...
Heart Rhythm Drug (Multaq[R]) Increases Risk of Death: Study Halted
Atrial fibrillation (AF), which occurs when the two upper heart chambers beat erratically, affects about 2.7 million Americans. The heart may return to normal rhythm on its own in some people with intermittent (non-permanent) AF. For those with permanent...
How E. Coli Bacteria Hijack a Cell's Sense of Direction
Working in the emerging field of systems biology, scientists at the University of Texas Southwestern Center in Dallas were able to predict how bacteria that cause food poisoning hijack a cell's sense of direction and then confirm those predictions...
Oxygen Plus MRI Helps Determine Cancer Therapy Success
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A simple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test involving breathing oxygen might help oncologists determine the best treatment for some cancer patients, according to researchers from the University of Texas in Dallas. Studies...
Physical Fitness Trumps Body Weight in Reducing Death Risk
If you maintain or improve your fitness level, even if your body weight has not changed, you can reduce your risk of death. In a study of 14,345 adult men, mostly Caucasian and middle or upper class, researchers found that maintaining or improving...
Pistachios Lower Cholesterol, Provide Antioxidants
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] A handful of pistachios may lower cholesterol and provide the antioxidants usually found in leafy green vegetables and brightly colored fruit, according to a study from Penn State University. "Pistachio amounts of 1.5 ounces...
Pregnancy Complications and Heart Problems in Middle Age
UNITED KINGDOM -- Women who develop pregnancy-related hypertension disorders or diabetes may have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease later in life. "We wanted to learn about possible explanations as to why women with pregnancy complications...
Risk Factors in Middle Age Linked to More Heart Disease
Although a person's risk of heart disease might be low during the next five to 10 years, the lifetime risk could still be very high. Finding from a recent study could have implications for both clinical practice and public health policy. Dr. Jarett...
Soy Protein Supplements Help Reduce Blood Pressure
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Soy protein supplements have been found to be associated with lower systolic blood pressure (BP) compared with refined (simple) carbohydrate dietary supplements. The results suggest that partly replacing refined carbohydrates...
Sugar-Sweetened Beverages May Lead to Women's Cardiovascular Problems
Drinking two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day may expand a woman's waistline and increase her risk of heart disease and diabetes. In a study at Northwestern University in Chicago, researchers compared middle-aged and older women who drank...
Tax Credit of $10,000 for Adoptions
Families who adopted a child with special needs from foster care in the United States could claim a federal adoption tax credit even if they had no adoption expenses. The National Society of Accountants (N.S.A.) is promoting this tax credit opportunity,...
The Temperature of the Human Body
Before studying the characteristics of fever, it is important to first have an understanding of how the body regulates its temperature. Homeothermia Humans are homeothermic, which means that their body temperature should always remain the same...
Vitamin C and the Elixir of Life
Scientific evidence attributes a major role to ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in the development of life on the planet Earth. Ascorbic acid is produced in large amounts in both simple and complex plants and is closely related to glucose (blood sugar in...
Vitamin C May Inhibit AIDS Virus
Two scientists at the Linus Pauling of Science and Medicine Institute at Palo Alto, California, conducted research with Dr. Pauling in a search for a substance that could retard the growth of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. They...
Whole-Grain Flour Boosts Nutrition of Crackers and Cookies
If Agricultural Research Service (A.R.S.) researchers in wheat quality have their way, more recipes for crackers, cookies, and other baked goodies will call for a greater proportion of flour made from whole-grain wheat, in relation to the amount of...
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