French Forum

Journal covering literary criticism and French literature.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 3, Fall

Beckett's Molloy: Inscribing Molloy in a Metalanguage Story
Themes pertaining to Beckett and language have often been mulled over in the past forty years, yet the quest for the self is seen by many critics as the essential theme in Beckett's Molloy (1951), his first novel written in French. Jean-Jacques Mayoux...
Between Stephane Mallarme and Rene Ghil: The Impossible Desire for Poetry
Among those who frequented Stephane Mallarme's Tuesday-evening gatherings in the Rue de Rome, perhaps none caused as much controversy as poet Rene Ghil. Ghil began as an ardent admirer of Mallarme's poetry, but soon their views of poetry diverged....
Books Received
Ursula Bahler. Gaston Paris et la philologie romane. Geneve: Droz, 2004. 873 pp. Yves Bonnefoy. Shakespeare and the French Poet. Ed. and with an introduction by John Naughton. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004. xix + 283 pp. Stephen...
Material Girl: Becoming and Unbecoming in Marie Redonnet's Forever Valley
Marie Redonnet's Forever Valley (1986) poses numerous riddles, many of which are never fully resolvable. The first puzzle is surely the title itself. The fact that the novel is named after the village where the first-person narrator lives fails to...
Sade, Vanille et Manille: Urology and the Body of the Text
The malady that D.A.F. Sade complained about to his wife in the famous "La Vanille et la Manille" letter from the Bastille at the end of 1784 has never been satisfactorily identified. Sade thought his suffering was due to a congenital defect of some...
Staging Dialogues and Performing Encounters in French AIDS Narratives
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) testimonies often stage two different spaces of dialogue, a recurrent and traumatic dialogue with the mirror and a posthumous dialogue with the former lover who has died of AIDS. This article explores how...
The Etat Civil: Post/colonial Identities and Genre
Naming peoples and places was a central feature of colonial and imperial enterprises: to name was to have dominion, or at least the illusion of control that colonial administrators sought to make real. The attempt to regulate, in some way, the name...
The Querelle in the Marketplace: Bonaventure Des Periers and the Fishwife's Rhetoric
Bonaventure Des Periers, a French author of the first half of the sixteenth-century, owes most of his critical acclaim to the Lucianic dialogues entitled Cymbalum Mundi, generally attributed to him. Critics from the sixteenth century onward have found...
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