The Journal of Southern History

TheJournal of Southern History is a quarterly journal owned and published by The Southern Historical Association. It has been in publication since 1935, and its editorial headquarters are in Houston, Texas. TheJournalof Southern History focuses on southern history, broadly interpreted. Issues contain scholarly articles, historical notes, book reviews and news of historical interest. Contributors to the journal include almost everyone who is doing or has done significant work in the field of southern history. All members of The Southern Historical Association are recipients of the journal as are others interested in the study of the South. The journal's region is the United States.TheJournal of Southern History has included articles on such topics as "Opposition to Polygamy in the Postbellum South" (November 2010), "African American Farmers and Civil Rights" (November 2007), "A Region in Harmony: Southern Music and the Sound Track of Freedom" (November 2006) and "The Second Slavery: Modernity in the Nineteenth-Century Sough and the Atlantic World" (August 2009). Randal L. Hall is the Managing Editor. John B. Boles is the Editor, Bethany L. Johnson is the Associate Editor and Allison N. Madar is a Visiting Assistant Editor.

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 2, May

Announcements and Activities. (Historical News and Notices)
At the annual meeting of the Southern Association for Women Historians (SAWH) on Friday, November 16, 2001, in New Orleans, Louisiana, Joan Marie Johnson, a scholar-in-residence at the Newberry Library, received the A. Elizabeth Taylor Prize for her...
Annual Report of the Secretary-Treasurer
THE PAST YEAR WAS A PARTICULARLY EVENTFUL ONE FOR THE SOUTHERN Historical Association. We enjoyed a very successful annual meeting in New Orleans, with the highest attendance in recent decades. Of perhaps more long-term significance, we have begun...
Flag Culture and the Consolidation of Confederate Nationalism
AS WILLIAM HOWARD RUSSELL'S TRAIN RUMBLED THROUGH NORTH Carolina on April 15, 1861, the celebrated diarist of the London Times spotted his first Confederate flag, waving atop a pine tree stripped of its branches. By the time he witnessed a similar...
Going off Half-Cocked: A Review Essay of Arming America
THE PROFESSION OF AMERICAN HISTORIANS IS NO MORE IMMUNE FROM THE toils of notoriety than the business world with its corporate meltdowns. One popular historian seems to have borrowed lengthy passages from compatriots as coolly as some Houston executives...
Guerrilla Warfare, Democracy, and the Fate of the Confederacy
ONE OF THE MOST ENDURING EXPLANATIONS FOR WHY THE CONFEDERACY lost the Civil War asserts that the Rebels were too democratic. First proposed by David H. Donald as a variation on a theme by Frank L. Owsley, it has survived, with some modification by...
Obituaries. (Historical News and Notices)
Public historian Jerry W. DeVine passed away on December 13, 2001. Jerry grew up in Alabama and attended Jacksonville State College, where he received his B.A. in secondary education and M.A. in history. For ten years he taught in various public schools...
SHA Sexual Harassment Policy. (Historical News and Notices)
The Southern Historical Association opposes sexual harassment in all aspects of academia. Further, the Association encourages informational activities designed to promote the education of its members and the public regarding sexual harassment and to...
Southern History in Periodicals, 2001: A Selected Bibliography
THIS CLASSIFIED BIBLIOGRAPHY INCLUDES MOST SCHOLARLY ARTICLES IN the field of southern history published in periodicals in 2001 except for descriptive or genealogical writings of primary interest to a restricted group of readers. Since some journals...
The Association. (Historical News and Notices)
Nominations for 2002: The 2001 Nominating Committee, consisting of Raymond Gavins, Duke University, chair; Sally G. McMillen, Davidson College; Waldo E. Martin, University of California at Berkeley; Edmund L. Drago, College of Charleston; and Jacqueline...
The Second Battle for Woman Suffrage: Alabama White Women, the Poll Tax, and V. O. Key's Master Narrative of Southern Politics
IN 1937 MINNIE L. STECKEL, A SOCIOLOGIST AT THE ALL-WHITE ALABAMA COLLEGE for women in Montevallo, made the following observations: "A consideration of how [poll tax] laws affect women indicates that in many circumstances they do result in limiting...
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