The Journal of Southern History

TheJournal of Southern History is a quarterly journal owned and published by The Southern Historical Association. It has been in publication since 1935, and its editorial headquarters are in Houston, Texas. TheJournalof Southern History focuses on southern history, broadly interpreted. Issues contain scholarly articles, historical notes, book reviews and news of historical interest. Contributors to the journal include almost everyone who is doing or has done significant work in the field of southern history. All members of The Southern Historical Association are recipients of the journal as are others interested in the study of the South. The journal's region is the United States.TheJournal of Southern History has included articles on such topics as "Opposition to Polygamy in the Postbellum South" (November 2010), "African American Farmers and Civil Rights" (November 2007), "A Region in Harmony: Southern Music and the Sound Track of Freedom" (November 2006) and "The Second Slavery: Modernity in the Nineteenth-Century Sough and the Atlantic World" (August 2009). Randal L. Hall is the Managing Editor. John B. Boles is the Editor, Bethany L. Johnson is the Associate Editor and Allison N. Madar is a Visiting Assistant Editor.

Articles from Vol. 73, No. 3, August

Colonial Southeastern Indian History
DESPITE GARY B. NASH'S 1974 INSISTENCE THAT DISCUSSIONS OF EARLY America include "red, white, and black," for the next fifteen years early American history and the history of American Indians during the colonial period remained, for the most part,...
Early Modern Southeastern North America and the Broader Atlantic and American Worlds
HISTORIANS OF NEITHER THE INDIGENOUS INHABITANTS OF THE MAINLAND of southeastern North America nor the colonies Europeans established there after 1560 have ever been comfortable working with the framework of the history of the South. The very idea...
Esse Est Percipi: The Strange Case of Early American Economic History
TO START A REVIEW ESSAY IN EARLY MODERN ECONOMIC HISTORY WITH A phrase associated with Bishop George Berkeley, one of that era's foremost immaterialists, is both ironic and depressing. But this phrase, esse est percipi--to be is to be perceived--captures...
Globalization, Creolization, and the Not-So-Peculiar Institution
IT HAS BECOME A CLICHE TO PROCLAIM THE NEED TO INTERNATIONALIZE the study of the United States. Well-funded conferences, special issues of prestigious journals, and countless panels at professional meetings have been devoted to discussions of how to...
Historical News and Notices
THE ASSOCIATION The seventy-third annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association will be held Wednesday through Saturday, October 31-November 3, 2007, at the Marriott in downtown Richmond, Virginia, with the Crowne Plaza serving as the overflow...
How Do You Get from Jamestown to Santa Fe? A Colonial Sun Belt
LONG AGO, IN 1541, THE WESTERN AND EASTERN PORTIONS OF THE southern regions of the present-day United States were oh-so-briefly connected. That year, expeditions of two different Spanish explorers, one from the southwestern reaches of the continent,...
Law in the Colonial South
WHO GOVERNED? AND BY WHAT WARRANT DID GOVERNORS RULE? THE English who founded Jamestown in 1607, along with every other European who colonized the southern portions of North America, confronted those fundamental questions whenever founder and settler...
Learning to Live with Nature: Colonial Historians and the Southern Environment
WHEN CAPTAIN CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT GUIDED THREE SMALL SHIPS UP the James River in the spring of 1607, he and the hundred or so colonists on board had little reason to worry about the natural world. Virginia, they believed, was much like the Mediterranean...
Race Matters in the Colonial South
WHEN EUROPEANS BEGAN COLONIZING THE SOUTHERN STRETCH OF NORTH America in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, they had been thinking and writing about Indians and Africans for at least a hundred years. As Europeans hungered for Indian lands...
Redefining and Reassesssing the Colonial South
THE TITLE OF THIS FORUM INSTANTLY SUGGESTS A DEFINITIONAL PROBLEM, one that Carl Bridenbaugh encountered more than fifty years ago when he began to think about the Fleming Lectures he was asked to present at Louisiana State University in 1951. Bridenbaugh...
Religion and the Early South in an Age of Atlantic Empire
EARLY 1704: QUEEN ANNE'S WAR RAGES ON THE FRONTIERS OF EASTERN North America. Indian and European allies advance southward through the forest on unsuspecting enemy villages. A surprise raid--defenders are quickly overpowered. Homes and churches are...
Some Reflections on the South in the American Revolution
THE SUBJECT OF THE SOUTH IN THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION WAS ONCE freighted with emotion and controversy. Professional historians were hardly guilty of such partisanship, though relatively few of them have examined the Revolution in comprehensive regional...
Women, Gender, Families, and Households in the Southern Colonies
FAMILY, GENDER, AND HOUSEHOLD RELATIONSHIPS ASSUME CENTER STAGE in fictional portrayals of southern life from Absalom, Absalom to Steel Magnolias. By contrast, historians showed little interest in these topics until recently, and good work was especially...
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