The Journal of Southern History

TheJournal of Southern History is a quarterly journal owned and published by The Southern Historical Association. It has been in publication since 1935, and its editorial headquarters are in Houston, Texas. TheJournalof Southern History focuses on southern history, broadly interpreted. Issues contain scholarly articles, historical notes, book reviews and news of historical interest. Contributors to the journal include almost everyone who is doing or has done significant work in the field of southern history. All members of The Southern Historical Association are recipients of the journal as are others interested in the study of the South. The journal's region is the United States.TheJournal of Southern History has included articles on such topics as "Opposition to Polygamy in the Postbellum South" (November 2010), "African American Farmers and Civil Rights" (November 2007), "A Region in Harmony: Southern Music and the Sound Track of Freedom" (November 2006) and "The Second Slavery: Modernity in the Nineteenth-Century Sough and the Atlantic World" (August 2009). Randal L. Hall is the Managing Editor. John B. Boles is the Editor, Bethany L. Johnson is the Associate Editor and Allison N. Madar is a Visiting Assistant Editor.

Articles from Vol. 83, No. 3, August

Luke Lea, the Legionnaires, and the Legacy of Two Wars: The Politics of Memory in the Mind of a Nashville Progressive, 1915-1945
Over the Christmas and New Year's holidays of 1918-1919, Luke Lea, colonel of the Tennessee-raised 114th Field Artillery, tried to capture Wilhelm II, the former German kaiser, and take him to Paris as World War I's prize criminal. Although Lea had...
Obituary
Charles Joyner, known to his many friends as "Chaz," eminent scholar of southern history and former president of the Southern Historical Association, died September 13, 2016, in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Joyner's career is not easy to summarize...
Race and Class Friction in North Carolina Neighborhoods: How Campaigns for Residential Segregation Law Divided Middling and Elite Whites in Winston-Salem and North Carolina's Countryside, 1912-1915
In 1913, W. E. B. Du Bois looked back on the deal African Americans had made with white southerners and declared it a mess of pottage. In return for giving up claims to political rights in the South, African Americans were supposed to have been given...
The Association
The Southern Historical Association will hold its eighty-third annual meeting in Dallas, Texas, on November 9-12, 2017, Thursday through Sunday. Printed programs will be mailed to members this month, but meeting highlights and information on tours...
The Mafia, la Raza, and the Spanish-Language Press Coverage of the 1891 Lynchings in New Orleans
On October 15, 1890, New Orleans police superintendent David C. Hennessy was shot six times in the French Quarter as he headed home from work. A dying Hennessy uttered to his captain that his murderers were "Dagos," using an epithet for the growing...
Warriors for Lower Prices: The New Orleans Housewives' League and the Consumer Cooperative Movement, 1913-1921
During the 1914-1915 industrial depression, a harrowing food crisis gripped New Orleans and the nation. The Housewives' League, a local consumer advocacy group composed of white middle-and upper-class women, believed that President Woodrow Wilson's...
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